Skip navigation
1 2 3 4 5 ... 24 Previous Next

Resources

360 Posts tagged with the author tag
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Author + Social Media =??? - Seekerville

Do genre and category matter when it comes to using social media?        

                           

Thirty-three Revenue Streams for Authors "Even If You Write Nonfiction"The Future of Ink

Are you taking advantage of all your branding opportunities?          

 

Film

                                                        

Thirteen Ways to Cast A-list Actors in Micro-budget Films - Filmmaker Magazine

Aim high with the right material, and you just might be surprised what kind of star power you can attract.      

                                          

Feature Film Journal #3: Creating a Visual Pitch Package and Treatment - Noam Kroll

Pre-production stills can help investors understand your vision.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Productivity Hacks for Musicians - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Are you taking consistent action?  

  

How to Hit High Notes in the Context of a Song - How to Sing Better

Sometimes you can hit the high note but not in any particular song.    

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- February 20, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- February 13, 2015

1,565 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, music, film, author, self-publishing, promotion, movies, publishing, promotions, music_marketing, song, musicians, filmmakers, social_media, revenue, music_exercises
0

For some authors, there is a very understandable hesitation at associating their writing efforts with marketing efforts. In short, authors don't like to be thought of as a brand. They don't like everything they do to be associated with building said brand. They have a strong distaste for brand talk, and I get it. After all, isn't branding just a contrived exercise, made up of insincere tactics, to create an image for an author that appeals to as many people as possible?

 

No, but that is how many authors perceive branding. Branding, in the realm of the author, is nothing more than a public representation of your true self. It's you being you on a blog, within your social media circles, or on your YouTube channel. It's not you being what you think your readers want or what will help you sell the most books. That's called spin, and it has a short shelf life that eventually will spin out of control and cost you sales.

 

Like it or not, you are a brand, and your brand identity stems from your core values. Your basic beliefs dictate your brand decisions. So, do you know what your core values are? I know it sounds like an insane question. Most people know what they believe, right? Not necessarily. They know what they like and what they dislike, but, more times than not, they can't identify why.

 

Here's my challenge to you: identify the top three things that make you happy and three things that make you angry. Provide a short defense for each item in your list. Explore why each item made the list. When you're done, you'll have a better understanding of your core values, and moving forward, your brand will have a more authentic and confident voice.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

 

Is Podcasting Right for You?

Social Media Swap

2,167 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, branding
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Commonly Confused Words: How to Avoid These Grammar Gaffes - Huffington Post

Direct objects, nouns, verbs, time sequences and comparisons: These are things to guide you down the grammar path.        

                           

How to Get Influencers to Notice You - The Future of Ink

Looking for an endorsement for your next book?          

 

Film

                                                        

Nine Things Artists Do to Hold Back Themselves and Their Work - Film Courage

Avoid the chaos and move forward.      

                                          

Using a Motivated Key Light - Filmmaker IQ

What do you get when you mix practicals with additional lights?   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Simple Rhythm Hacks for Musicians - Artiden

When you're a pianist, drills alone won't help you find your rhythm.  

  

Five Steps: How to Record Better Vocals - Made 2 Create

Quit relying on technology to fix vocal mistakes.    

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- February 13, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- February 6, 2015

1,578 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, author, indie, writers, writing, films, musicians, filmmakers, grammar
1

The Horoscope Prompt

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 18, 2015

I will admit to reading horoscopes. I don't necessarily take them seriously, and most of the time the predictions are so general they could apply to the first five random people I meet on the street, but they are fun to read. They are basically great little story prompts for writers.

 

Think about it. Horoscopes contain general descriptions of angst that a character may be experiencing. They hint at possible solutions to that angst. They may allude to the possibility of romance or the meeting of an important person in one's life. Or maybe there's the promise of an unexpected financial windfall. Horoscopes are fertile ground for the basic elements of a compelling story.

 

So, here is my challenge to you: take a week and track your daily horoscope and the horoscope for one other astrological sign. In essence, you're following the lives of two fictional characters. At the end of the week, take these 14 horoscopes and build a single synopsis for a story. Before you start, decide the genre of the story and bend the elements of the horoscopes to fit your style.

 

When you're done, you should have a page or two that gives a fairly detailed description of a story. You will likely have caught a creative wave in the writing and expanded upon what the horoscopes offered, but that's okay. That's how developing a story works. It grows in the telling.

 

Finding a story isn&'t that difficult. They are all around you if you take the time to look. In this case, they are figuratively in the stars.

 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

WordPlay: The Rum Runners' Retreat

WordPlay Writing Prompt: Diamond in the Rust

1,932 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, writing, craft, writing_advice, writing_excersises
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Research Your Crime Novel - Writer's Digest

Crime scene descriptions, forensics, police interrogation tactics: just how far do you have to go to research your crime novel?       

                           

The Story Grid. How to Tell a Story and Edit Your Fiction with Shawn Coyne - The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn interviews Shawn Coyne about keeping a reader engaged enough to purchase your next book.          

 

Film

                                                        

How to Network in Hollywood (or Anywhere, Really) - Filmmaking Stuff

When raising money for a film, remember not to make the conversations exclusively about you.       

                                          

Ten Lessons on Filmmaking from David Lynch - Filmmaker Magazine

David Lynch is one of the most innovative filmmakers working today.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Vocal Performance and Acting Technique: Making Choices - Judy Rodman

Lights. Camera. Sing.   

 

Should You Run Paid Ads to Promote Your Music? -  Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

What to consider before you pay to advertise your band.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- February 6, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 30, 2015

1,612 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, music, author, movies, musicians, filmmakers
2

You Are an Artist

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 11, 2015

You are not just a writer. You are an artist. If you create, you dabble in the arts. There is just no escaping it. So, what are you doing to build your brand as an artist in your local community?

 

Chances are you are not doing anything, and that's okay. A lot of authors neglect to sell themselves as artists. We adopt the mind-set that ours is strictly a commercial endeavor, when that's only half the story. We are artists, same as painters with galleries, same as playwrights and actors working in theater, same as photographers with upcoming exhibits. These are our peers.

 

I'm stressing your classification as an artist because I want you to start presenting yourself as an artist and building connections within your local arts scene. The best way to do that is to become a participant on a board or committee for various organizations that support the arts. For example, if there's a community theater in your area, chances are they are in need of volunteers to either serve on the board or assist during productions in some capacity. A museum or art gallery in town may need volunteers to help organize shows. Or there may be a local film society that needs your creative input.

 

By getting involved in the art community and volunteering your time, you're building contacts and your reputation as a serious contributor to the art scene. You'll have support for your next book launch or reading.

 

Remember, you are not just a writer. You are an artist. Reach out to your fellow artists, and start the process of building your local artist brand.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Science Can Help You Be a Better Artist!

Four Tips for Real-Life Networking

3,513 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, artist
1

As we make our way into 2015, I suggest making a concerted effort this year to have at least one copy of your book with you wherever you go. You never know when you're going to come across a potential reader, so it's best to be prepared. I've sold many books over the years simply because I had a copy with me. The reality is that most people will go their entire lives without meeting an author, so when it happens, they are often excited to buy a signed copy. Why? Because even if they don't plan to read it, having a personalized autographed copy of a book is cool! And who knows? Maybe they will read it, love it, write a glowing review about it on Amazon and Goodreads, then tell their friends to read it, or even buy copies for their friends as gifts.

 

Here are some places I have sold and/or given away my books:

 

  • Airplane
  • Train
  • College alumni networking event
  • Dentist's office
  • Holiday cocktail party
  • Starbucks
  • Optometrist's office
  • Yoga studio
  • Friend's barbecue

 

As I mentioned above, I've also given many copies away, which is a good strategy when the recipients are the kind of people who are likely to share their opinions on social media, etc., or are in a clear position to help you if they enjoy the book.

 

I realize that carrying a book around isn't always practical, especially if you don't use a purse. But if you have a car, it is definitely doable. Just toss a few copies in the trunk, and you're good to go. The key is to do your best to be consistent because you just never know whom you're going to meet while waiting in line for that latte.

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in:

 

Guerrilla Book Marketing Tactic

Why You Should Give Away (Some) Books for Free

1,949 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions
10

I'm experiencing something weird as a writer. I know the ending of a story before I've finished writing the book. It's happened to me a few times before, but normally the process is a tad bit murkier for me when it comes to plotting the ending. I usually don't know the ending until I finish the first rewrite and even then, it may change by the time I'm done with the second rewrite.

 

This time, however, the ending is clearer in my mind's eye than it ever has been before, and I'm not even halfway through the first draft. Now, I didn't know the ending when I started the book, but by the time I got done with the first major scene, the ending smacked me in the face in the most glorious way possible.

 

When do you know the ending of your stories? Do you know it before you ever start writing? Do you know it before you reach the conclusion? Or do you complete a draft without a clear ending and then hammer it out during rewrites? I've experienced the ending epiphany, and I have to say, knowing the ending before the first draft is done is thrilling. I wake up every day with a little extra writing oomph because I'm so anxious to write the ending scene with all the fictional tentacles attached to it. That's not to say I don't enjoy writing when I don't know the ending. I do. The journey is just different.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

A Satisfactory Ending

What Matters More: The Beginning or the Ending?

1,891 Views 10 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, fiction, ending
0

The following exchange happened in a workshop after a public reading of some new material by an unnamed writer:

 

 

Facilitator: Do you know who the characters are in this scene? What about the woman? Where is she coming from? Why is she so hostile towards the man? Is she the good guy or the bad guy? What is her motivation?

 

Writer: She's his niece, and she hates him, but she is committed to taking care of him because she made a promise to her father, before he died, that she would watch after his alcoholic brother.

 

Facilitator: This is revealed later on in the story?

 

Writer: No. It's just stuff I've uncovered along the way that didn't make it into the story.

 

Facilitator: Excellent! That's exactly what I wanted to hear. You know what's not on the page. You know these characters.

 

Why is it important that you know what's not on the page? After all, if it's not read, why does it matter? It matters because it gives you, the writer, two essential storytelling tools: confidence and boundaries. The confidence will help you write from a position of strength. You'll know how to maneuver through a story because you know the bigger picture. You'll not only know what motivates your characters, you'll also know what kills their spirits and causes them to give up.

 

 

The boundaries will inform you on the choices your characters make. You'll know without hesitation why they behave in the way that they do. You will know the lines that can't be crossed without consequences.

 

 

When you know what's not on the page, you know what belongs on the page.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Can Visualization Help You Finish That Manuscript?

Reality Check: Remember Why You Wrote Your Book in the First Place

1,854 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, author, writers, writing, workshop, book_clubs, writing_workshop
0

In my first job out of college, one of my assignments was to co-write an opinion piece for my boss. (In this case, "co-write" meant "write.") He told me the points he wanted to make, and my role was to turn those ideas into a clear, readable argument that a prominent magazine in our industry would accept. Both of us would get the byline, so I was excited!

 

I'll never forget my boss'ss reaction when I proudly showed him my masterpiece. He smiled at me, then sighed and said something along the lines of, "Ah, how difficult to part with young words."

 

At first I didn't understand what he meant, but then he (tactfully) explained to me that the essay would be much better if I cut out about a third of it. He also said he understood that it would be hard for me to delete words I'd taken such precious time coming up with in the first place. My twenty-two-year-old ego was bruised by his reaction to my hard work, but when I read what I'd written again, I realized something: He was right.

 

I'd gotten so wrapped up in the thrill of seeing my own words in a magazine that I overdid it and lost sight of the point of the assignment - to make a clear, readable argument. And yes, while it was hard to part with those words, the revised essay was much better as a result.

 

The experience provided me with a valuable lesson. Even though I now write novels for a living, I still have a tendency to, shall I say, overstate the point - especially in the early chapters when I'm still figuring things out. In the revision process of my latest book, my editor marked several sections as "already stated" or "already made clear" and (strongly) suggested that I delete them, which I quickly did. And guess what? My feelings weren't hurt. Growth all the way around!

 

Note: In this post I'm talking about repetition of information or concepts. Click here to read my post about what to do with entire scenes that end up on the cutting room floor.

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

 

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in:

Writing Takes Discipline

Four Forms of Creativity Fuel

3,504 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, editing, author, writing
1

Social Media Swap

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 2, 2015

You have a resource that more than likely you have been ignoring as a marketing and branding tool. It may have never occurred to you that you are not alone. You have fellow authors who are also working all the angles to market their books and build their brands. They too are overlooking the same marketing opportunity you are overlooking.

 

 

You do, I hope, have an active presence on social media. You are, I hope, friends with other authors on social media. They have their own sets of friends and followers. You have your own set of friends and followers. Why not combine the two? How, you might ask? With a little something I call a social media swap.

 

Here's how it works:

 

Contact an author in your midst, and propose that you do a two-way interview on Facebook. You will both gain exposure with the other's friends and fans. You could even set up a Skype interview to utilize video. Or, if the other happens to live in your local area, you could set up an in-person on-camera interview.

 

 

You don't want to pick just any author for a social media swap. You want to pick an author who writes in your genre, and you want to pick an author whose work you've read. If you pick an author outside of your genre, you're fishing in the wrong pond. If you pick an author who you don't respect as a writer, you run the risk of tying your brand to an author your audience also might not respect.

 

 

When you are trying to build an author brand and market a book, it's important to keep in mind you're not the only one trying to build an author brand and market a book. Reach out to your fellow authors and make a proposal that could help you both.

 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Three Things to Avoid When Looking for a Review

My Beta Readers Experience

8,856 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, social_media
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Eleven Secrets to Writing Effective Character Description - Writer's Digest

Avoid bullet point descriptions.       

                           

When Are You Done? - The Seekers

How do you know when it's the end of your story?         

 

Film

                                                        

Minimum Cost a Filmmaker Will Spend on a Film Festival Publicist by Diane Bell and Chris Byrne of RebelHeartFilm.com - Film Courage

Getting into a film festival is great, but it does come with a cost.       

                                          

Do We Really Want Our Digital Footage to Look Like Film? Or Are We Actually Chasing the "Alexa" Look? - Noam Kroll

Some filmmakers may actually want a high-end digital image instead of the film-look.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Numb Singing or Speaking Voice? Question: What Are You Looking At? - Judy Rodman

What is your eye language?  

 

Why Music Matters - Hooks and Harmony

Music is good for the soul.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- January 23, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 16, 2015

1,617 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, film, author, self-publishing, promotion, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers, branding, social_media
1

Creativity is the name of the game. Without it, writing fiction would be very difficult...okay, impossible. So how does one keep the creative juices flowing? Here is my four-step program to help you stay creative:

 

  1. Stay busy - For most people this is not a difficult step to follow. Everyone in this day and age is busy, but I'm not talking about your writing life in this instance. I'm talking about your life outside of writing. Find things that take your mind as far away from writing as you can.
  2. Reflect - When you're not busy either writing or living, take the time to sit quietly and reflect on your day. Go over the smallest details. As you reflect, pay attention to your breathing and get to the point where you're actively taking in and letting out breaths slowly. If this sounds like meditation, you're right. Some people don't think they have time to meditate, so I like reframe it as breathing. If you don't have time to breathe, then you're in trouble.
  3. Establish a routine - Drive to work the same way every day. Have the same thing for lunch every day. Tie your shoelaces the same way every day. Dress the same way. Write at the same time every day. Be boring. Be predictable.
  4. Break your routine - After you establish a routine for a few weeks, obliterate it. Change things up. Take a different route to work. Change your writing schedule. Forget what you worked so hard to establish in step three.

 

This program is not scientifically proven to work, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out the principle behind what I'm suggesting. Keep the mind from getting complacent. Allow it to rest occasionally and lull it into a false sense of security. Let it think it's safe to relax and expect the "same old same old" every day. Once complacency sets in, change things up. Creativity often comes from the strain of change.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Creative Writing Exercises

Is the Early Bird More Creative?

6,903 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, writing
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Writing Deadline Dos and Don'ts - Huffington Post

If you've set a deadline for your next release, here's how to reach it.     

                           

Twenty-one Fast Hacks to Fuel Your Story with Suspense - Writer's Digest

Author Elizabeth Sims tells you how to dial up the suspense.       

 

Film

                                                        

Five Filmmaking Lessons for Directors, DPs, & Those Working with Multi-Cam Setups - No Film School

Lessons on finding your camera's dynamic range.     

                                          

Why a Director Shouldn't Edit Their Own Film - Filmmaking.net

Collaboration is a valuable asset in filmmaking.  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Musicians: Discover a Simple Way to Connect with Fans - Musicgoat.com

The smallest things can have the biggest impact. 

 

Marketing Lessons from Taylor Swift - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Bob Baker explains how indie musicians can learn a lot from Taylor Swift.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- January 16, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 9, 2014

1,564 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, filmmaking, author, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, writing, films, suspense, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media, writing_advice
2

If you've never heard of "active voice" or "passive voice," don't worry, you're not alone. However, while you might not know the official terminology, I'm willing to bet you can easily spot the difference between the two.

 

In the active voice, the subject of the sentence is doing the acting. For example:

 

  • I am writing this blog post.
  • You are reading this blog post.
  • They are enjoying that book.

 

In the passive voice, the subject of the sentence is being acted on by the verb:

 

  • This blog post is being written by me.
  • This blog post is being read by you.
  • That book is being enjoyed by them.

 

While active voice is strong and clear, passive voice is somewhat watered down...and a bit weak.

 

It's fine to use passive voice now and again, but the problem with using it too often is that it can bore - and potentially frustrate - your audience. Passive voice can also leave readers with unanswered questions if certain information isn't provided. For example:

 

  • The man was seen on the street early in the morning, and it was reported that he was up to no good. (Who saw the man? Who reported that he was up to no good?)

 

Still confused? Here's the first paragraph of this post again.

 

If you've never heard of "active voice" or "passive voice," don't worry, you're not alone. However, while you might not know the official terminology, I'm willing to bet you can easily spot the difference between the two.

 

Now here it is rewritten in the passive voice:

 

If "active voice" or "passive voice" has never been heard of by you, don't worry, you're not alone. However, while the official terminology might not be known by you, I'm willing to bet that the difference between the two can easily be spotted by you.

 

See the difference? Think active = strong and passive = weak. Who doesn't want to be strong?

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in:

 

Why the Passive Voice Is Hated By Me

Why Good Grammar Matters

1,867 Views 2 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, grammar, active_voice, passive_voice
1 2 3 4 5 ... 24 Previous Next

Actions