Skip navigation
1 2 3 4 ... 30 Previous Next

Resources

443 Posts tagged with the books tag
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Why Every Writer Should Keep a Travel Journal - Writer's Digest

Your experiences on the road may be worth some money.        

                           

Write More: Seven Tips for Dealing with Writing Distractions - Beyond Paper Editing

Maybe it's time to go old school and ditch your fancy laptop for a more low-tech approach.          

 

Film

                                                        

Ed Burns on The Brothers McMullen, Finding Your Voice, and the Meat Grinder of Independent Filmmaking - The Week

The filmmaker who helped usher in today's modern independent filmmaking movement.      

                                          

Becoming a Full-time Filmmaker: When to Quit Your Day Job - Filmmaking.net

When should you let go of your security net?  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Three Email Marketing Mistakes Musicians Make that Cost Them Fans and Money [Podcast]- Musicgoat.com

How to make your email marketing more engaging.  

  

Vocal Strain: What is it and What Can You Do about It? - Judy Rodman

Don't ignore vocal strain, or you might do permanent damage.    

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- February 27, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- February 20, 2015

1,455 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, film, author, self-publishing, movies, writers, publishing, writing, journal, promotions, filmmakers, branding, social_media, independent_film, email_marketing, vocals, writing_exercises, writing_tip
0

Don't Force an Ending

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 25, 2015

I just want to warn you that there's this little-known song from a movie that barely made any money at the box office that I'm going to reference in this blog post. It comes from an obscure animated flick called Frozen and the song title is "Let It Go." Oh, you've heard of it? Good, then I can spare you the video of me singing this catchy tune.

 

 

That is the wisdom I wish to impart on you today: let it go. Can't find an ending for that book you've worked so hard on for months? Let it go. What? You say it's been years? Let it go. Endings can't be forced. Well, they can, but they usually come off sounding that way. Your best strategy is to move on to the next project. Shed the frustrating missteps from your mind when it comes to finding the perfect ending, and redirect your creativity.

 

 

Albert Einstein didn't come up with the Theory of Relativity sitting in front of a chalkboard hammering out formulas and chasing mathematical equations down a rabbit hole. He came up with the idea as a clerk at the patent office staring out the window. In other words, he wasn't focused on revolutionizing physics. He was daydreaming. Had he been focused on making a great discovery at that particular moment, who knows, would he have developed the most famous scientific discovery of the modern age?

 

 

The ending will come to you when you let go of the need to find the ending. In a weird metaphysical way, stories don't like to remain unfinished. Your brain will find its way there on its own. If you force it, your brain will fight you and give your story an unsatisfying ending. Stop fixating, and start daydreaming. Let it go.

 

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

 

When Do You Know The Ending?

Know Thy Story

1,986 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, book, writers, publishing, writing, craft, ending, writing_advice, writing_tip
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Research Your Crime Novel - Writer's Digest

Crime scene descriptions, forensics, police interrogation tactics: just how far do you have to go to research your crime novel?       

                           

The Story Grid. How to Tell a Story and Edit Your Fiction with Shawn Coyne - The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn interviews Shawn Coyne about keeping a reader engaged enough to purchase your next book.          

 

Film

                                                        

How to Network in Hollywood (or Anywhere, Really) - Filmmaking Stuff

When raising money for a film, remember not to make the conversations exclusively about you.       

                                          

Ten Lessons on Filmmaking from David Lynch - Filmmaker Magazine

David Lynch is one of the most innovative filmmakers working today.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Vocal Performance and Acting Technique: Making Choices - Judy Rodman

Lights. Camera. Sing.   

 

Should You Run Paid Ads to Promote Your Music? -  Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

What to consider before you pay to advertise your band.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- February 6, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 30, 2015

1,775 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, music, author, movies, musicians, filmmakers
0

The following exchange happened in a workshop after a public reading of some new material by an unnamed writer:

 

 

Facilitator: Do you know who the characters are in this scene? What about the woman? Where is she coming from? Why is she so hostile towards the man? Is she the good guy or the bad guy? What is her motivation?

 

Writer: She's his niece, and she hates him, but she is committed to taking care of him because she made a promise to her father, before he died, that she would watch after his alcoholic brother.

 

Facilitator: This is revealed later on in the story?

 

Writer: No. It's just stuff I've uncovered along the way that didn't make it into the story.

 

Facilitator: Excellent! That's exactly what I wanted to hear. You know what's not on the page. You know these characters.

 

Why is it important that you know what's not on the page? After all, if it's not read, why does it matter? It matters because it gives you, the writer, two essential storytelling tools: confidence and boundaries. The confidence will help you write from a position of strength. You'll know how to maneuver through a story because you know the bigger picture. You'll not only know what motivates your characters, you'll also know what kills their spirits and causes them to give up.

 

 

The boundaries will inform you on the choices your characters make. You'll know without hesitation why they behave in the way that they do. You will know the lines that can't be crossed without consequences.

 

 

When you know what's not on the page, you know what belongs on the page.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Can Visualization Help You Finish That Manuscript?

Reality Check: Remember Why You Wrote Your Book in the First Place

1,959 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, author, writers, writing, workshop, book_clubs, writing_workshop
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Write Better: 3 Ways to Introduce Your Main Character - Writer's Digest 

How to create characters that the reader will not only like, but feel like they know, as well.           

 

How to Create an Effective, Engaging Video - Marketing Tips for Authors

Your author video must have a purpose to engage the viewer.     

                           

 

Film

                                                        

Three Reasons Why Great Directing Hinges on Prep Work and Pre-production - Norm Kroll

Going into production without being prepared can ruin a great film.     

                                          

How to Build Your Audience through Email - Filmmaking Stuff

Email is a good tool to use to build your audience.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Six Resolutions All Musicians Should Make for 2015 - Hypebot.com

It all starts with knowing what you're getting into. 

 

What's Wrong with Your Vocal Warm-up? - Judy Rodman

Before you commit to doing vocal warm-ups before performances, make sure you're doing them right.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- January 9, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 2, 2015

1,765 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, author, promotion, indie, movies, video, writers, writing, characters, films, promotions, directing, musicians, craft, social_media, character_development, author_marketing, film_audience, vocal_excersises
1

A couple of Saturdays ago, my good friends Martha and Tanya had a "stoop sale," which is what we apartment-dwelling New Yorkers call a good old-fashioned garage sale. As the three of us were discussing how much to charge for a beaded purse and why no one had yet bought the wooden elephant, a kind older gentleman strolled by. He struck up a conversation about the stack of books Martha and Tanya were selling. He said his name was Leland William Howard and explained that he'd written a memoir about the 20 years he'd spent with his beloved dog Betsy.

 

With tears of joy in his eyes, Mr. Howard told us how writing the book was purely a labor of love. He'd published it on his own and hadn't sold many copies, but that didn't matter to him. He had a story to tell, he told it, and he was extremely proud of having done so.

 

Bravo, Mr. Howard!

 

With all the focus on what to do once our books are "out there," too often we authors forget why we wanted to create a book in the first place. I've written seven novels now, but I remember the moment I finished the first one as if it were yesterday. I was overwhelmed with an incredible feeling of accomplishment, of pride, of fulfillment. And that was just the first draft! I had no idea what would come next, no clue that I would one day become a full-time author. And you know what? Since then I've have a lot of success with my writing, but none of it surpasses that initial feeling of pride, of I did it! I'm dead serious.

 

So many people want to write a book, but so few actually do. Try to remember that the next time you're feeling discouraged, OK?

 

-Maria

 

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in:

Those Wonderful Bumps in the Road

How to Write without a Plan

5,360 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

50 Things to Tweet When You're Stuck for Ideas - Mediabistro

For those times when you're feeling Tweet-less.   

                           

Your Book Landing Page: Can't-miss Headline Writing Secrets (and Mistakes to Avoid) - The Book Designer

How to hide a secret message in a headline on your website.      

 

Film

                                                        

How to Avoid Your Biggest Filmmaking Mistake - Filmmaking Stuff

Don't ever give up on your filmmaking dreams.    

                                          

6 Filmmaking Tips from Jean-Luc Godard - Film School Rejects

From the mind of the man who believes "cinema is truth 24 times per second."  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Maximizing Musical Collaboration through Video Conferencing - Hypebot.com

How video conferencing is being used today to make better music.

 

Becoming a Successful Music Producer - MusicConsultant.com

Rey Reel discusses his journey to become a music producer.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

Weekly News Roundup- December 26, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- December 19, 2014

1,639 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, writing, musicians
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Using Fiction Techniques for Writing Nonfiction - Helen Sedwick

How to get the logical side of your brain to have a little fun. 

                           

Eavesdropping for Story Ideas and Other Tips from a Veteran Novelist - The Book Deal

Bestselling author Warren Adler shares advice on writing and publishing.      

 

Film

                                                        

Do You Know What the Difference Between a T-Stop and an F-Stop Is? - Noam Kroll

Do you know your aperture settings?    

                                          

Attention, Filmmakers: Here's 10 Tips for Finishing Your Documentary - IndieWire

Defining the narrative structure of your documentary.  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

How Valuable Is Your Voice? A Lesson from Van Gogh's Shoes - Judy Rodman

The marketplace does not determine the value of your voice.

 

How Changing It Up Can Help Build an Audience - musicgoat.com

If you want to draw more people to your shows, don't be so predictable.   

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

Weekly News Roundup - December 19, 2014

Weekly News Roundup - December 12, 2014

1,492 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, documentary, author, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, writing, promotions, musicians, branding, audience, writing_tips, target_audience
0

Book Launch Sponsors

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Nov 24, 2014

Having attended my first major book launch party as a guest, I left the event with the prevailing thought, “That cost a lot of money.” For me, I would even call it prohibitively expensive. I just don’t have that kind of expendable cash. So, what is a guy like me to do?

 

Why not find sponsors for your book launch? I’m of the opinion you don’t even have to have a strong author brand to attract sponsors. You simply have to have a solid plan for the event. If you explain the nature of your launch, which is to spark a viral marketing campaign, and you outline how you’re going to achieve such a goal, getting sponsors may be a relatively painless process.

 

First, you want to stress that pictures and video will be uploaded by you and guests attending your book launch. Beyond the people in the photos and videos, the background will be included in these shots. Signage can be included in the background. The author bio and book description you hand out at the event can include information about the corporate sponsors that helped finance the event. Email notices, social media updates, and even direct mailings prior to the event can include information about the sponsors. In addition, you want to stress to any prospective sponsor that you will be putting out a big push to have the media in attendance at your book launch.

 

Does this commercialize your book launch? Yes, without question, but let’s face it, that’s exactly what you want your book launch to be - a commercial. You can choose your sponsors carefully and give your event an air of class, but make sure the sponsor is appropriate for your book’s theme and genre.

 

Finding sponsors for you book launch event could be the perfect solution to funding a marketing strategy that has the potential of gaining you invaluable exposure.

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

Book Marketing Tip: Be Resourceful

Go Big

2,503 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, selling, book, self-publishing, book_promotion, book_launch, book_party
0

How long should my novel be? That's a question I hear quite a bit from new writers. They have experience as readers, but the only thing they can accurately gauge is the page count as it applies to the length of a book. We know as writers that word count is the unit of measure with which we should concern ourselves. That being said, what is the proper word count for a book that is made available for sale to the public?

 

Well, of course there is no law that dictates book length. What is and isn?t palatable by the reading public is subjective. But the expectations set by the book industry years ago are a good rule of thumb to follow today. I compared the numbers on three sites that addressed this matter and came up with general word counts for the following genres.

 

  • Middle Grade: 25,000 to 40,000

  • Young Adult Fiction (YA): 50,000 to 80,000

  • New Adult Fiction: 60,000 to 85,000

  • Romance: 60,000 to 100,000

  • Literary Fiction: 80,000 to 110,000

  • Mysteries/Thrillers/Suspense: 70,000 to 90,000

  • Fantasy/Science Fiction: 90,000 to 125,000

  • Horror: 80,000 to 100,000

  • Nonfiction: 70,000 to 110,000

 

It?s important to note that these numbers represent what the industry normally looks for from debut authors ? in other words, authors who don?t have established brands. Authors with a large following can and do break the word count expectations in whatever genre they specialize in. These numbers are simply to be used as a general guideline for new authors.

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

You may also be interested in...

Picking a Final Word Count Before You Write

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 2: Genre, Word Count, Finding a Reader, Announcing Intentions

3,230 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, book, author, writing, genre, word_count, writing_tips, industry_standards, wirting_advice
1

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is just around the corner! Join hundreds of thousands of authors who are taking the challenge to write an entire novel in the month of November.


50,000 words. 30 days. And 8 tips to get you started. Write on, Wrimos!

 

http://s3.amazonaws.com/createspacecommunity/10.22_NanowrimoPrepInfographic_BLOG.png

946 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, author, writers, writing, nanowrimo, novels, nano
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Five Moral Dilemmas That Make Characters (& Stories) Better - Writer's Digest

Without moral dilemmas, your character won't experience growth. 

                           

Six Tips for Writing Minor Characters - The Passive Voice

Minor characters do have a major impact on your story.       

 

Film

                                                        

How Movies Trick Your Brain into Empathizing with Characters - WIRED

Feeling a little schizophrenic? You might be watching a movie.    

                                          

The Minimalist Guide to Making a Movie - Filmmaking Stuff

You don't need to wait for the perfect moment to make a film. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Four Reasons You Should Sell Your Music by the Single - musicgoat.com

The release of singles may be back in a big way.

 

Niche Music Markets: How to Dominate Genres and Themes - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Sometimes the narrower the market, the better.  

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- October 3, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- September 26, 2014

1,597 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, film, author, self-publishing, indie, movies, writing, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers, social_media
0

I've stated before that I am not a "message" writer. Meaning, I don't write a novel with the purpose of addressing or revealing deep, philosophical themes and beliefs. I don;t begrudge anyone who does. We all have our own styles and paths as writers. I am just not talented enough to nudge these types of messages into a story line without making it look obvious, and in my mind, looking obvious is a serious storytelling offense.

 

As writers, we should avoid "on the nose" passages that more or less force a reader to draw a certain conclusion about the secret meaning behind the purpose of a book. These passages are usually found within symbolic events that a writer strategically places throughout the story to subtly reveal what they're really trying to say. The problem is these symbolic events aren't quite as subtle as they were thought to be.

 

For example, a protagonist struggling to get ahead in a cutthroat work environment may witness a small child strolling through the park, stopping only to smell a rose bush in full bloom. Suddenly, our protagonist gets it. The point of life is to enjoy life. That is "on the nose" symbolism, and it can draw groans and eye rolls from readers.

 

Include those secret messages in your story if you must, but navigate the terrain carefully. Avoid lazy writing with "on the nose" symbolism, and dig deeper. Reveal your hidden message without letting your readers know it's there. It's not easy to do, but it's worth the effort. Your readers will thank you by recommending your book to their friends and family.

 

  -Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

 

Don't Insult Your Readers

3 Rules for Writing a Scene

2,161 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, author, self-publishing, writers, readers, writing, craft, character_development, writing_tips, writing_ideas
1

Unfinished and Happy

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 29, 2014

I just finished the first draft of a project without actually finishing it. That is to say, I got to the conclusion of my main conflict, breathed in a feeling of accomplishment because I felt it hit the mark in every way, and then I wrote an ending I now hate. It's just wrong. The tone doesn't fit. The dialogue isn't in keeping with the rest of the book. It's just an ugly mess, and I don't care. In fact, I'm thrilled.

 

I'm not required by law to publish the work as is. I am free to change not just one word or two but all the words in the entire manuscript that don't belong. It took me a long time to come to the realization that I'm not judged for anything I write that isn't read by the public. Given that, I just write it badly in order to let it breathe a little.

 

What do I mean by "letting it breathe"? I mean a story can grow stagnate if you refuse to move forward unless you write it perfectly the first time. Forcing yourself to sit at the computer and painfully hammer out word after word at a snail's pace leads you down a path of resentment and bitterness for the story you once felt so passionately about. If you give yourself permission to write badly when you get stuck during the first draft stage, the story takes on a shape and form that you can tinker with, turn upside down, and rearrange until it's not an ugly mess.

 

If you find yourself unable to come up with the perfect ending for your book, don't. Come up with an imperfect ending. Finish it without actually finishing it. It's just the first draft.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

You may also be interested in...

How to Get Through the First Draft

After the First Draft

2,153 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, author, writing, prefect_ending
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Use Visual Marketing to Sell Books  - The Future of Ink

Have you been paying attention to your color palette?  

                           

How to Write a Novel with the Snowflake Method - The Creative Penn

Writing styles and methods are as unique as snowflakes.       

 

Film

                                                        

3 Ways to Rent Great Cameras & Cinema Gear with No Insurance - Noam Kroll

Noam Kroll has a workaround on how to rent high-end equipment without insurance.

                                          

Who Else Wants a Film Production Checklist? - Filmmaking Stuff

The plan that will help you get your film underway without all that chaos. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

3 Singing Exercises to Improve Your Vocal Pitching - Easy Ear Training

You've got to exercise those vocal chords to find the perfect pitch.

 

10 Music Bloggers Who Write about New Artists - Entertainment Divaz

Got a new release coming out? Here are some bloggers who may want to know.  

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Roundup- September 5, 2014

Weekly News Roundup- August 29, 2014

1,613 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, promotion, movies, publishing, writing, book_marketing, films, musicians, social_media, vocal, film_production, visual_marketing, film_camera, new_artist, sell_books
1 2 3 4 ... 30 Previous Next

Actions