Skip navigation
1 ... 17 18 19 20 21 ... 30 Previous Next

Resources

438 Posts tagged with the books tag
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Riverton Woman Says Editing 'Potter' Books Was Top-secret Job - SJ-R.Com

Sure she got to see the Harry Potter books before everyone else, but she couldn't tell anyone.

 

Is the Short Story Really the Novel's Poor Relation? - Guardian Book Blog

Do short stories have a place in today's world? Frankly, they may be more relevant today than at any other time.

 

Film

 

What if Star Wars Had Never Existed? - Guardian Film Blog

Would we even know what outer space looks like without George Lucas? Sure there was that whole Apollo project thing at NASA, but those spaceships weren't nearly as cool.

 

Independent Filmmaking - A Creative Labor of Love - Ai InSite

Studio films may have major financing, but independent filmmakers have much more freedom to make the films they want to make.

 

Music

 

Two Ways to Rehearse for Best Vocal Performance - Judy Rodman

Train your voice and your mind to get the optimum performance.

 

Open a Piano, Literally, as a First Step in Learning to Read Music - Music After 50

"Every Goat Breaks Down Fences." Trust me; it makes sense if you read the post.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 29, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 22, 2011 Edition

1,439 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, editing, editing, story, story, films, films, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, singing, singing, short_story, short_story
0

The Final Chapter

 

We've all been there. You fall in love with a book as you're reading it. It may even seem less like a book and more like an event. This book is your new favorite. You can't wait to tell your friends and family about the book, and then...you get to the last chapter and it falls completely apart. It seems to happen more frequently with books that cover social issues. The set-up is insightful, but the solution chapter doesn't hit the mark.

 

The weakness of last chapters is in large part a function of the sheer difficulty of devising answers to complex social problems that are sound, practicable and not blindingly obvious. Besides, those who give the most subtle diagnoses may not have the problem-solving disposition needed to come up with concrete, practical recommendations.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Why Last Chapters Disappoint

 

The Informed Audience

 

There was a day when filmmakers created a film and showed it to an audience that had no clue how movies were made. They didn't know the work that was involved. They didn't know the commitment it requires to take a movie from script to screen. They didn't appreciate the process behind making a film. Those days are gone.

 

While some see audience as the faceless mass waiting to be entertained or reduced to eyeballs needing to be captured, (Jay) Rosen points out that audiences now have the means and ability to make their own work...more people will have a newfound respect for those with talent (it isn't easy to create content worthy of an audience) and a network of creators can be harnessed to spread work much further than an expensive ad campaign can do.

 

You can read the entire article on ACTORSandCREW's website: Who Wants To Understand the Power of Little Networks?

 

All They Need is Love?

 

The Beatles were a legendary band because they got along so well, right? They created brilliant songs out of their utter love for each other, right? The music came from their heart, and their hearts were always working in concert to craft historical pop songs...right? Not really. According to a new book by authors Richard Courtney and George Cassidy, at least some of their collaboration was born out of strife.

 

THE Beatles were stymied. During a 1968 recording session, they couldn't find a suitable introduction to "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da," a song written by Paul McCartney. John Lennon didn't much like the song, and, after several hours, he stormed out of the studio. When he returned, he strode to the piano and banged out several chords, then added petulantly, "Here's your intro!" "All eyes shifted to Paul, expecting rejection, perhaps an outburst," according to a new book, "Come Together: The Business Wisdom of The Beatles." (Turner Publishing, $24.95). Instead, McCartney defused the tension with this: "That's quite good, actually." Lennon's chords, pounded out in a fit of pique, make up the song's now-famous opening.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Whisper Words of Business Wisdom

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 25, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 18, 2011

1,318 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, chapter, chapter, filmmakers, filmmakers, songwriting, songwriting, audience, audience
0

Could an E-book Look Like a Book?

 

There are those who are squarely in the print book camp. They are die-hard fans of the printed page and in most cases they loathe the e-book craze. And then there are the gadget guys and gals who love their e-readers. The very idea that they can download books from the internet from virtually anywhere at any time of the day sets their head spinning with sheer delight. The two methods of reading are separated by a great chasm of technology, but will that always be the case? What if a blank book with hundreds of pages of blank electronic paper could digitally morph into the book of your choice? Could e-books of the future look like the print books of today?

 

The object in your hands looks and feels like a book. The pages feel like paper. You flip through them, and all the words are there waiting for you; there's no waiting for a screen to refresh. The object might even be made, with a judicious dash of library-scented accord from my favorite perfume shop, to smell like the books you grew up with. You can make notes on the pages if you wish, provided you use the special digital pen attached by means of a thin ribbon to the spine.

 

You can read the entire article on The Millions' website: The Chameleon Machine

 

The Making of a Writing Partnership

 

The duo who brought you Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz are back with a new comedy called Paul. Simon Pegg and Nick Frost have been friends since 1993, and they've acted together plenty of times, but they've never written together before. They decided to put their science fiction geek credentials to good use and write the space alien send off. What they found is that being writing partners is different from being friends.

 

"It's very hard writing collaboratively," says Pegg. "When you have three ideas in a row which your partner has gone, 'Eh, I dunno,' you start to feel that it's personal." Frost jumps in: "Why do you hate me?" "Why aren't I allowed to have an idea?" continues Pegg. "The next thing you wanna do is just have an idea cause you haven't had an idea in 20 minutes. Even if it's not very good, and then you get annoyed at yourself for being petty and then there's 10 minutes of [cursing]." "Then someone will say, 'Cuppa tea?'" says Frost.

 

You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: 'Paul': Simon Pegg and Nick Frost on droid noises, chest hair and pink-mist romance

 

Classical Music Hits the Pop Charts

 

At one time, the music of Bach, Beethoven and Brahms was the popular music of the time. In essence, they were pop stars. Today, our pop stars look quite a bit different. They wear crazy clothes. Sport crazy hairdos...okay, so maybe they're not that different. But music has changed, and the pop music of yesteryear is now the classical music of our time. They are of two different worlds and never the twain shall meet...not so fast. Alessandro Striggio's 1566 mass has hit the charts in the U.K.

 

Several years ago, the work, Missa sopra Ecco sì beato giorno, was rediscovered in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, where it had been miscatalogued. In 2007, it was given its first modern performance at London's BBC Proms. Now, a new recording of the work has made its debut on the pop charts at number 68, beating the likes of Bon Jovi, George Harrison and Eminem.

 

You can read the entire article on The Independent's website: Lost choral masterpiece finally finds a home... in the pop charts

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 18, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 11, 2011

1,399 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, technology, technology, writing, writing, e-book, e-book, classical, classical
0

There have been times when I sit down to write and jump off the tracks with a subplot or two. They take on a life of their own, and after hours - sometimes days - of working them into the main storyline, I realize I've just been wasting my time. Or have I?

 

Could that subplot have a second life? After all, it was compelling enough to toy with and develop. I felt that it had value at some point. So why am I now going to turn my back on it? That subplot could be the seed for a new book!

 

When you are facing writer's block or beating your head against the wall on what the plotline of your next book should be, why not visit the ghosts of subplots past and test their durability. Start by writing a one-page synopsis built around the subplot to see if you can build an entire story from it. No one is going to see this synopsis, so don't worry about typos or spelling or perfect grammar. Just let your thoughts flow.

 

Once you have a page, tear it down paragraph by paragraph until you have a single sentence that fully describes your subplot. If you have gotten this far, you have turned your subplot into a fully functioning plot, and you have your next book idea! You can even do this with subplots that you used for books you've already published. In this case, they will be building blocks for sequels.

 

The lesson here is don't throw any idea away. You never know when old, unused subplots, or even ramblings written on a cocktail napkin, will come in handy. Remember, even Mother Nature needs time to turn coal into diamonds.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 4: Reinforce the Muse, Develop Sub-plots, Map the Remaining Chapters

You Have More Than One Book Inside of You

825 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, writers, writing, plot, craft
0

We've all been there, staring at the computer screen, our ring fingers resting on the 'L' key and ready to type, only to stop and ponder, "Should I use 'lie' or 'lay' here?" And there it is: another writer foiled by the often confusing and twisted rules of the English language. It's likely that if you ask three people when to use lie or lay, you will get three different answers. With the exception of using lie to describe an untruth, the two words are often misused. So let us strip away the mystery of the lie/lay conundrum.

 

Lie is an intransitive verb, meaning there is no direct object involved. For instance, you don't lie the object down. It is a complete verb. Lay is a transitive verb. In the case of a transitive verb, a direct object is required. You must lay the object down. Lay needs the object to be correct.

 

The real confusion starts when we look at the various tenses of the words. Let's break the two words down.

 

Lie

  • Present tense - Lie
  • Past tense - Lay
  • Past participle - Lain

 

Lay

  • Present tense - Lay
  • Past tense - Laid
  • Past participle - Laid

 

You can see why we writers get confused when the past tense of one of the words is also the present tense of the other word. What's a writer to do? Here are some examples to help:

 

Lie

  • I lie down every afternoon after lunch.
  • I lay down yesterday after lunch.
  • I have lain down after lunch before.

 

Lay

  • I lay the book on the desk.
  • I laid the book on the desk.
  • I've laid the book on the desk many times before. 

 

It's easy to see the difference in the two words in these examples. The forms of lie aren't followed by an object, while the forms of lay are followed by an object (in this case, a book).

 

To be sure, the lie/lay riddle isn't the only thing that trips writers up. The complexity of the English language, with all its exceptions, is the number one reason you should always work with an editor before publishing a book for public consumption. Mistakes are made by brilliant writers, but they can be avoided. If you'd like more information on the lie/lay puzzle or other confusing words, check out Grammar-Quizzes.com.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Does Grammar Matter?

A Good Writer Can Ruin a Good Story

4,011 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, writers, writers, writers, writers, writers, writers, writing, writing, writing, writing, writing, writing, craft, craft, craft, craft, craft, craft, grammar, grammar, grammar, grammar, grammar, grammar
0

A Different Kind of Posting

 

An unknown writer in New York has decided to serialize his book by posting it one page at a time. I call that a fairly extreme tactic. What makes it more extreme is he isn't posting the pages on the internet; he's posting it on lampposts. Yes, you read correctly. Lampposts in New York's East Village are playing host to a single page from the unknown writer's book. Not everyone is a fan of the idea.

 

Although no author has yet publicly taken credit for the work, the East Village had no shortage of opinions about it. "Honestly, I don't like the idea. I hate it when people just post things everywhere," said Joe Curanhj, 42, owner of Stromboli Pizza, located right in front of the lamppost bearing Page 8. "They have the Internet, why don't they use that?"

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Post's website: 'Light' reading

 

Why Studios are Giving First-Time Directors $100,000,000+ Budgets

 

There was a time when Hollywood studio execs wanted their first-time directors to cut their teeth on small-to-modest budget films. It made sense. They didn't know what a new director was actually capable of, so they were cautious. But times have changed. Today, first-time directors are getting big budget films as their first gigs. Some budgets are even approaching $200 million. Why the change in philosophy?

 

During the past five years, though, technology has enabled rookie directors to hone their skills via FinalCut Pro, digital-video cameras and other state-of-the-art effects tools from a young age, prompting budget-cautious studios to salivate over what they can put on screen for a price. Gareth Edwards, for instance, made his indie sci-fi film Monsters for a few hundred thousand dollars, even though it looked much more expensive. He's now up to direct Godzilla for Warner Bros.

 

You can read the entire article on The Hollywood Reporter's website: Why the Studios Are Trusting Untested Directors for Major Jobs

 

All of a Sudden, Investors are Flocking to Digital Music Companies

 

Most articles you read about companies offering digital music downloads focus on their inability to make much of a profit. Finding investors for these companies has never been easy. Until now. For reasons unknown or not quite understood by many experts, investors are pouring some big money into some of these companies. Needless to say, it's a welcome development for most.

 

But more bullish investors point to technological developments and shifts in consumer behavior as signs that the business is about to turn a corner. These changes include the migration of digital media libraries from personal computers to the remote storage of the "cloud," as well as the explosive success of smartphone applications.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Investors Are Drawn Anew to Digital Music

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 4, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 25, 2011

1,328 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, digital, digital, directing, directing, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

Ahhh, week five is here. You've invested a month of writing and you've developed your story and characters. As they say in the writing world, you're over the hump. On this week's agenda: reading what you've written, listing the pros and cons in your work, and conferring with your reader.

 

Invest in printer ink - I know we're moving toward a more paperless society, yet with this particular phase of the writing process, I like to print out the pages I've written. I then find a spot where I'm alone and out of earshot of other human beings, and I read what I've written out loud. It usually takes a long time, and I may split the task up over a few days, but I stick with it until I read the last word. I also do it with a red pen in hand, and I cover these pages with so much red ink, they look like they're bleeding.

 

Strengths/weaknesses - After you've read and slashed your manuscript to pieces, it's time to look at it the way that a publisher would. Is the story, as written, worth investing your time? If you weren't the author and had money to invest in your story, would you? To answer these questions, make the reliable two-column list, where you write out the manuscript's strengths versus its weaknesses. Remember you're not looking at it as the author. You're looking at it as the publisher. Try to separate the emotional investment you've made as the writer of the manuscript from the contents of the manuscript itself.

 

Confer with your reader - During week two, we chose a reader to evaluate our work. It's likely the reader isn't up to speed on all the pages you've written thus far, but he or she has probably read enough to where you're able to compare notes with each other. Take your reader out to dinner and discuss the story. Make it a long dinner, because you may need to coax some things out of them. Giving criticism isn't an easy thing to do for most people, so make a promise to your reader and to yourself that you won't take negative feedback personally. If it helps, go to dinner and maintain the mindset of the publisher, not the writer.

 

We'll leave this series on the life of a manuscript here for now. You may be close to finishing, or you may be weeks away. Everyone works at an individual pace, and I'd like to stress that there is no right or wrong way to write a book. As far as I'm concerned, as long as you're writing, you're headed in the right direction. Good luck and happy writing!

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 4: Reinforce the Muse, Develop Sub-plots, Map the Remaining Chapters

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 3: Edit and Post the First Paragraph, Evaluate Progress, Tweet as Your Main Character

622 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, book, book, writers, writers, writing, writing, manuscript, manuscript, craft, craft
0

Wow! We're already on week four. For me, this is the first commitment benchmark. If I make it four weeks into a manuscript, I'm more than likely going to see it through to the end. It means I'm intrigued by how the story is developing, and like a reader discovering a good story for the first time, I'm compelled to keep going. Here's what's on tap for this week:

 

Reinforcing the muse - Something sparked you to begin writing this book...a moment, a person, a song. Whatever the muse was that got you going, take some time to reinforce it this week. Find a picture that represents the object that gave you the impetus to start writing this story. It may sound like an insignificant exercise, but there have been times when I've struggled to write another word (or the first word of the day in some cases). I've found that focusing on that picture that represents my muse sparks an image or idea on how to move forward. It's a great motivational tool.

 

Sub-plots anyone? - By now you may have noticed that a few unplanned sub-plots have popped up in your story. You may not even be sure where they came from - they just felt like organic elements to the overall story at the time you wrote them. This is a perfectly natural part of the writing process, but that doesn't mean they're a necessary one. And, if they're not necessary, you don't want them in your story. Take a careful look at these developing subplots and honestly assess their value before you go any further. Do they add to the main plot? Can they help you tie up loose ends, or give you that twist you were looking for? Be bold and brutal in your assessment of these subplots because they can make a good story better - or worse.

 

The road map yet traveled - You've got a good chunk of the book written. You've gotten some feedback from friends, followers, and family. You've picked apart your sub-plots. You're now ready to fill in the gaps on the remaining chapters. You can take the time now to create a fairly detailed road map on the remaining chapters. Once you do, you should notice the actual writing will proceed at a much faster clip. It's much easier to get where you're going if you have a map.

 

That's it for this week. Come back next week, when I'll talk about reading out loud, listing strengths and weakness, and conferring with your readers.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 3: Edit and Post the First Paragraph, Evaluate Progress, Tweet as Your Main Character

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 2: Genre, Word Count, Finding a Reader, Announcing Intentions

1,617 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, book, writers, writing, manuscript, craft
0

As an author, the chance to speak to a group (large or small) is an incredible opportunity. It is in every sense of the word an "event," meaning it is out of the ordinary. People are taking time out of their day to come hear what you have to say about your book. This is your chance to connect with readers on a very personal level - a level beyond social media interaction and e-mail exchanges. It's an honest-to-goodness face-to-face meeting between reader and writer, so it's imperative you make the most of it.

 

I make the most of my appearances by bringing a haul of books with me to my speaking engagements. And you may be surprised that I don't offer these books for resale. I bring books as gifts for members of the audience. Here's why: it's important for me to make an impact with those who sit in a room for an hour or so to listen to me talk about my books and the publishing process. So, I reward them for their time. On the surface, it appears that I am losing sales, but that's not how I look at it. I'm making an impression (and an investment) that is adding more mouths to my word-of-mouth campaign.

 

As an example, I was recently invited to a speaker's night at a school. I brought a box of books with me, and I had a line of kids (my target audience) after the presentation all wanting a free signed copy of one of my books. I ended up running out of books, so I worked out a date with one of the teachers to return with more books. The teacher contacted me the next day and thanked me profusely. He said the kids couldn't stop talking about my books and the presentation. A few of the kids even sent me friend requests on Facebook a couple of days later. I made the connection I was after, and I left with new "recruits" to help spread the word about my books.

 

I count such giveaways as a marketing expense. It's all part of my strategy to gain as many readers as I can. I encourage you to give this strategy some thought for your next speaking engagement. You don't need to bring hundreds of books. Bring as many as you feel comfortable giving away. I've worked both extremes. I've given away 40-50 at events that cater to my demographic and a half dozen or so at events that don't draw big members of my readership. Ask the organizers what kind of crowd they are expecting and how many they think will be in attendance.

 

Your job as an author is to recruit readers. In turn, these readers will help you make sales. Good luck and happy recruiting!

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Preparing for a Personal Appearance

Four Tips for Real-Life Networking

1,881 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, book, networking, promotions, public_speaking, speaking, event
0

The Growing Power of Self-publishing

 

Evidence continues to grow showing self-publishing may not just be a viable alternative to traditional publishing, but it may actually be the preferable option. The hurdle to distribution now no longer an issue, many self-published authors are finding great success selling books, particularly ebooks. The latest superstar among the self-published is Amanda Hocking.

 

By May she was selling hundreds; by June, thousands. She sold 164,000 books in 2010. Most were low-priced (99 cents to $2.99) digital downloads. More astounding: This January she sold more than 450,000 copies of her nine titles. More than 99% were e-books. "I can't really say that I would have been more successful if I'd gone with a traditional publisher," says Hocking, 26, who lives in Austin, Minn. "But I know this is working really well for me."

 

You can read the entire article on USA Today's website: Authors catch fire with self-published e-books

 

Selling Wine to Make Movies

 

Believe it or not, Francis Ford Coppola believes the Godfather films sidetracked him from the type of career he really wanted in film. The success of the first film in the trilogy made Coppola a hot commodity in Hollywood. The problem was he found himself being asked to make films he didn't want to make. His solution? Retreat to his winery, make some dough with his Coppola-brand wine and self-finance the films he wants to make.

 

You try to go to a producer today and say you want to make a film that hasn't been made before; they will throw you out because they want the same film that works, that makes money. That tells me that although the cinema in the next 100 years is going to change a lot, it will slow down because they don't want you to risk anymore. They don't want you to take chances. So I feel like [I'm] part of the cinema as it was 100 years ago, when you didn't know how to make it. You have to discover how to make it.

 

You can read the entire article on The 99%: Francis Ford Coppola: On Risk, Money, Craft & Collaboration

 

Opera Goes 3D

 

You know what would make theatre more real? Three dimensional images. I know the people on stage are already in three dimensions, but that's so 2010. What the black tie crowd really wants at the opera is Hollywood 3-D type effects. Or so Robert Lepage, director of "Siegfried," believes. In fact, he's banking on it.

 

Its use at the Met, so far, will be limited to forest scenes in "Siegfried." It will not be employed in the final work of Wagner's cycle, "Götterdämmerung." Inevitably, it will give more ammunition to Wagnerites and critics who view Mr. Lepage's sophisticated electronics as a distraction from the drama and the music. Peter Gelb, the Met's general manager, said the 3-D effect only "adds to the visual elements" of Mr. Lepage's "Ring." Mr. Gelb said he was sensitive to the perception that technology was driving the "artistic product." In this case, Mr. Gelb asserted, "technology is in the service of art."

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: 3-D Comes to Met Opera, but Without Those Undignified Glasses

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 18, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 11, 2011

1,414 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, books, books, authors, authors, filmmaking, filmmaking, self-publishing, self-publishing, e-book, e-book, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

We're on to week three. I don't expect that we're all on the same page (pardon the pun), but I hope you are getting a sense of how another writer manages the process of writing a book. For me, it's always beneficial to read or hear how other writers are doing it so I can evaluate my own style and procedures. No one way is the right way. In the end, you should do whatever keeps you moving forward. Here's what I take on in Week 3:

 

Edit for public consumption - One of the greatest motivating factors for me when I'm writing a book is getting feedback on the initial pages or chapters. Call it narcissistic, or even masochistic, depending if the feedback is good or bad, but for some reason hearing what other people have to say about my work early on gets my creative juices flowing. But, before I let them see anything, I do a basic edit and clean it up as best I can. I'll then post the first paragraph (or two) on my blog and notify my family, friends, and followers that I'd appreciate their honest feedback.

 

Evaluate progress - By this time, I've devoted a good number of hours to the project, so it's time to evaluate my progress thus far and see if and where I need to adjust. What I'm looking at is the number of pages I've cranked out so far, the quality of the work I've done, and story structure. I've started projects before and let myself run wild and free with the prose without sufficiently checking myself. The result was a story that fell apart and eventually frustrated me to the point of ditching the project. If you stop and look at your progress on a regular basis, you can avoid these frustrations.

 

Tweet as your main character - This is not a tool I use frequently, but I've seen other writers do it with much more commitment and success than me. The few times I have used it, I did find that it gave me a better understanding of my character's backstory. It's not something I recommend for everybody, but if you're a Twitter addict, why not work it into your tweeting schedule? It could also help you generate pre-publication buzz for your title.

 

That's it for this week. Come back next week, when I'll talk about ways to stay motivated, outlining the remaining chapters, and developing sub-plots.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 2: Genre, Word Count, Finding a Reader, Announcing Intentions

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 1: Idea, Character, Plot, First Pages

1,449 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, book, editing, writers, writing, craft, social_media
0

Over the years I have come across various contests held by authors in order to boost sales. I'd always been skeptical of the practice because spreading the word about a contest is as difficult as spreading the word about a book. The way I see it, there are thousands of contests to compete with, so just how do you stand out? It just didn't make sense to me, but I was still curious about the concept.

 

One day my curiosity got the best of me. I decided I was going to hold a contest for my books, but I told myself I wasn't going to do it to boost sales - I was doing it to boost the word-of-mouth buzz for my brand. I was fully prepared to count exposure over money as a success. In the end, I received hundreds of entries and I actually ended up selling enough books in the process to more than cover the expense of the contest. It turned out to be a win-win for me. Here's what I did from beginning to end, which may give you ideas for hosting your own contest.

 

  1. Picked a prize - Many authors give away signed copies of their books, which is great if you're a well-known author. For me, I didn't feel like it was enough of a hook to get people interested. So, I chose to give away a Kindle e-reader. They're great gadgets, and people were intrigued enough by them to try and win one.
  2.  


  3. Created the rules - I wrote a simple list of rules with two things in mind: first, I wanted this contest to be about spreading the word for my brand. That was my primary focus. Second, no one would be required to pay a dime to enter my contest. This was difficult since my contest required entrants to know something only somebody who read my book would know. The solution was to offer the PDF of the book available for download on my website for free. I also provided a link to a page where they could buy the paperback if they preferred print, but I stressed the free version.
  4.  


  5. Made the announcement - I posted the contest announcement on my blog, Twitter, Facebook, and a message board that was exclusively for Kindle users. In addition, I found bloggers who dedicated their blogs to e-books and sent them a notice. I set up an email account specifically for the contest, and within hours of making the announcement I started getting inquiries.
  6.  


  7. Managed the contest - There's a lot of work to be done from the time you make the announcement to the time you stop taking entries. Mostly I was fielding questions about contest rules and pointing people to the PDF link if they couldn't find it. But a lot of it was just thanking people who had entered the contest.
  8.  


  9. Announced the winner - I videotaped myself drawing a name out of a jumbled pile of entries and posted it on YouTube. I then contacted the winner via email and let her know she had won. She was ecstatic, and I was really happy for her. She even sent me a picture of her holding the new Kindle when she got it and gave me permission to post it on my blog.

 

All in all, the contest was a success. I got the exposure I was looking for, and I even made a tiny profit. Contests can be time-consuming, but I felt it was worth it. That's my story. How about you? Do you have any experience organizing contests or giveaways?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Does Silly Sell?

To Serialize or Not to Serialize, That Is the Question

1,361 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, promotion, blogging, contest, promotions, branding
0

An Immortal Life Reveals a Big Heart

 

For 50 years, the medical research and pharmaceutical industries have made millions of dollars off the incredibly durable cancer cells of one woman, Henrietta Lacks. Neither she nor her family has ever received a dime for her contribution to science. She was never even asked if her cells could be used for research. Enter author Rebecca Skloot and her book about Henrietta's unique story, "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks." Skloot is making sure Henrietta's family is finally receiving some compensation.

 

Soon after the book came out, she created the Henrietta Lacks Foundation to help Mrs. Lacks's descendants, some of whom suffered from the whirlwind of publicity, misinformation and scam artists surrounding HeLa cells, not to mention a lack of insurance to pay for any of the medical advances Mrs. Lacks's cells made possible. "I first envisioned it as a foundation for education, but I realized that the people who were affected the most were her kids, and they needed some medical care and dental care," Ms. Skloot said from her home in Chicago.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Returning the Blessings of an Immortal Life

 

Here's Looking at Humphrey Bogart, Kid.

 

He'd swagger in front of the camera and deliver a line with that haunting affect of his, and you knew immediately he was a man's man, a tough guy through and through. He even managed to play a screenwriter in a movie and make him the toughest guy in the room. What was it about Humphrey Bogart that made him so imposing?

 

By the time his film breakthrough came, he was 42 and already wearing the vestiges of betrayal, loss and resignation that would bring the shadow of a back story to every role he played. Photographs of Bogart in the 1920s, when he was in his 20s, show a bright-eyed, smooth-cheeked actor whose features haven't set yet. The transformation took place before we made his acquaintance. The Bogart we came to know on the screen was mature when he arrived, with compressed emotions, an economy of gesture and a compact grace in movements that were wary and self-contained, as if all the world were not a stage but a minefield.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Here's Looking at Him

 

How to Be a Hit Maker

 

Ever wonder what it takes to make it in pop music? How to collect more Grammys than you have shelf space? Produce one hit after another that turns into prestige and cash and more cash? I've wondered that, and I'm not even a musician. Music producers RedOne, Alex Da Kid and Ari Levine discuss their secrets to creating hits.

 

On Saturday evening in front of a sold-out crowd, Powers led a freewheeling conversation that sought to put into words the magic that turns a bunch of notes on paper (or, these days, a hard drive) into a hit song. "I think the most important thing is having a vision. Being able to see things before other people can see it," Alexander Grant - better known as Alex Da Kid - told the audience inside the Grammy Museum's Clive Davis Theater. "Most of the songs you're working on, they won't even come out for three or four months at least, maybe longer, so you have to be able to think what's going to be a hit record in six months."

 

You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: From an idea to a single: RedOne, Alex Da Kid and Ari Levine discuss making hits

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 11, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 4, 2011

1,427 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, music, music, films, films, producers, producers, actors, actors, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

Well, we've reached week two of the life of a manuscript. You've done the hard part in the first week: you know your primary characters. You've captured the feel of the story by clearly defining the plot and writing the first few pages. You can adjust plot and characters as you go along, but by now, you should be well on your way to writing a steady stream of pages. The story should be in your blood by now. We're on to the next few steps in Week 2:

 

Commit to a genre - This may sound like a no-brainer, but I've talked to too many authors who don't know what genre their book falls under. Some authors believe it's beneficial to write a book that isn't pigeonholed by the expectations that come with being associated with a specific genre. In point of fact, the opposite is true. When you know your genre, you create a deeper level of connection with your story. It's important to know what type of book you're writing early on, because the expectations you may have tried to avoid will actually be a great guide for you as you write. Yes, you're bound to overlap into other genres, and that's fine. But you'll still have a primary genre as your basic map.

 

Pick a word count - I've discussed picking your word count early in the writing process before on this blog. I suggested that it's advantageous to do it before you start writing. I'll amend that a little here: it's advantageous when you are ready to start writing in earnest. The reason is similar to the reasoning of picking the genre early on: it creates rules for you to follow. I'm a big believer that rules free you up to be more creative. When you're faced with something you can't do because it would violate a self-imposed rule, you will turn to your creative nature to stay within those rules. Setting the word count will also let you know what your pacing should be in order to reach a conclusion in a satisfying manner. If I pick my target word count at the earliest possible point, I, at the very least, know what rhythm I need to establish as I write.

 

Find a reader - Writing tends to be a solitary endeavor, but it doesn't have to be. Find a friend or family member who is willing to read your pages as you write. You want someone whose opinion you trust because you're going to ask them to be brutally honest with you. You're asking them to do something that's time-consuming and perhaps even a little uncomfortable. Be respectful of their input. Listen to what they have to say, and then keep on writing.

 

Announce your intentions - It's time to let the world know what you're doing. This is what social media is for: to let your friends and followers know what your latest adventure is. In this case, it's writing a book. This is where your word-of-mouth campaign gets underway, and it's also a way to keep you honest. If you announce that you're writing a book to your entire network, you'll feel that much more obligated to finish it.

 

That's it for this week. Next week, we'll move on to editing and posting your first paragraph, evaluating your progress, and building buzz on your project.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

The First 5 Weeks of a Manuscript - Week 1: Idea, Character, Plot, First Pages

Picking a Final Word Count Before You Write

1,912 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, book, writers, writing, genre, craft, social_media, word_count
0

Are You What You Read?

 

Part of the story of any tragic event at the hands of a madman usually turns to what books the madman chose to read. Like it or not, the books we read can be at the center of any judgment reached on our character. But is it fair to judge us by what we read? Do we know anything about Hitler's character because he liked books about the Old West? Or does knowing that Charles Manson liked "Stranger in a Strange Land" by Robert Heinlein really give us a view into Manson's demented mind? Geoff Nicholson explores the topic in The New York Times.

 

The psychiatrist Fredric Wertham got things about as wrong as can be when he argued, in "Seduction of the Innocent" (1954), that the fact that prisoners and juvenile delinquents read "crime comics" meant that comics were causing, or at least stoking, their criminal tendencies. Current evidence suggests that if criminals read at all - and let's not forget how many prisoners are functionally illiterate - then they read much the same books as the rest of us, business and self-help books included.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: The Perils of Literary Profiling

 

Independent Filmmaking is No Longer All about Meeting Scarlett Johansson

 

Before the financial slide in 2008, it used to be fairly easy to find a guy making a mint on Wall Street to invest in your independent film, especially if there was a chance they would be able to meet one of their favorite Hollywood stars. But when the market tanked, their expendable cash dried up, and the independent film industry hit a rough patch. Fortunately, government incentives and expanding distribution channels have helped put the industry back on its feet.

 

And it's getting easier to finance movies than it was two years ago. "The amount of equity required to finance a film has diminished," say Steven Beer, a lawyer at Greenberg Traurig who is helping to sell three films at the festival this year including a documentary about A Tribe Called Quest. "The Jobs Creation Act gives filmmakers a federal tax credit for qualified production. Couple that with state incentive programs which can offer up to a 40% return on a per project basis."

 

You can read the entire article on Forbes' website: The Improving Economics of Independent Film

 

There's Always Something New to Make You Buy That Old Album

 

The music industry has enjoyed the fruits of changing formats for decades. That old "What a Long Strange Trip It's Been" album was also available as a tape you could listen to in your car, and then it became a CD you had to have because of the superior sound quality, and then it was released in MP3 format that you could listen to on your ultra-portable, whiz-bang audio device. What's the next format you'll have to invest in? Kyle Bylin of Hypebot.com looks into the future of music formats.

 

It appears as though the days of a singular format are numbered. By my count, there are six music formats right now that seek to challenge the rein of the MP3. A few of them aren't as much of a format as much as they are a delivery tool, but I'm counting them. For example, a flash drive is just a storage device that holds music, but in recent years, many groups have sold them. 

 

You can read the entire article on Hypebot.com: Is The Format Replacement Cycle Over?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 4, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - January 28, 2011

1,675 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, indie, indie, films, films
1 ... 17 18 19 20 21 ... 30 Previous Next

Actions