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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

 

Choosing An Editor For Your Work - Mike Cane's

Not just any old editor will do. Like any relationship, you need to find someone with whom you have some chemistry.

 

 

The Teacher's Edition Interview - Ramona DeFelice Long

Writing teacher and freelance editor Ramona Long dishes out some excellent advice in this extensive interview.

 

 

Film

 

 

Become a Successful Filmmaker in One Difficult Step - The KR7productions Blog

The best way to become a filmmaker is to...wait for it?make a great film. It's as simple and as complicated as that.

 

 

Burns on Filmmaking: A Conversation at Dartmouth - Dartmouth Now

A little known documentary filmmaker named Ken Burns shares his thoughts on film in this video. 

 

 

Music

 

 

Small Business Jobs Act For Musicians - eleetmusic

Could new small business legislation help musicians get micro-loans?

 

 

The 6 Phases of Music Marketing by Dexter Bryant, Jr. - Artists House Music

Does your music have sustained attention? How about credibility? Dexter Bryant can help.     

 

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - October 12, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - October 5, 2010 Edition

1,286 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, filmmaking, filmmaking, editing, editing, writers, writers, interior, interior, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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From Page to Screen

 

Don't look now, but publishing companies are starting to look a lot like film studios. That might be because a few publishing companies have created Film/TV units. These departments are actually involved in the production of the film version of a book, usually partnering with a studio. Macmillan is the latest to jump into the Hollywood lights, but they aren't first and probably won't be the last. Brendan Deneen of Macmillan explains the move.

 

"We are mostly looking to develop book ideas that work both as novels and movies and TV shows," Deneen told Deadline. "We will develop the ideas in-house, and hire writers who'll share in the success of the projects. We will retain all rights and hopefully set them up." Macmillan Films properties will be shopped in Hollywood by Sylvie Rabineau of RWSG?"It's a new way to control intellectual property because in this changing world, he who controls IP wins," Deneen said. "Books will always be the core business here, but if you can be attached to the movie, the videogame and the Happy Meal, why not?"

 

You can read the entire article on Deadline New York's website: Macmillan Publishers Starts Film/TV Unit

 

 

Making Money with Your Documentary

 

Documentaries are an increasingly popular form of expression in the filmmaking community due to a never-ending supply of cultural topics to cover. If you're a master of the documentary genre, how can you make money with your film? Marke Andrews of The Vancouver Sun tackles that question.  

 

Makers of documentaries got some sound advice Wednesday at a Vancouver International Film Festival trade forum session on the film acquisition business, even if those advising them disagreed on many points. Get your documentary into film festivals to create a buzz, but don't enter too many festivals because the buzz may become over-exposure?Think about niche markets, but make sure your film's content doesn't scare off those in the niche.

 

You can read the entire article on The Vancouver Sun's website: Dos and don'ts to sell your doc

 

 

 

My T-Shirt Proves I've Been a Fan Longer Than You.

 

When it comes to concert t-shirts, it seems the older the better. In fact, if you're seen at a concert wearing a t-shirt from that very concert, you risk judgment from the masses. It's even preferable to wear another band's t-shirt to show your diverse musical tastes. Yes, even in the world of rock and roll, etiquette abounds. It appears that it's okay to be rebellious and different as long as you do it like everyone else who's different and rebellious.

 

 

However, fans will often wear the T-shirt of band playing if it is from a previous tour. The older the tour, the higher the prestige and the greater likelihood the shirt will initiate conversations about the fan's experience. On the Wedding Present's current tour, which revisits their Bizarro album, some fans are wearing shirts from the original 1989 tour, much to the delight of fellow fans.

 

You can read the entire article on The Guardian's website: Ask the indie professor: What does your gig T-shirt say about you?

 

 

-Richard

 

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - October 8, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - October 1, 2010

1,606 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, film, film, movies, movies, publishing, publishing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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I took a creative writing class in college, and on the first day I couldn't wait to jump into the process and begin writing. My enthusiasm was soon tempered by exercises and assignments that had very little to do with actual writing. We had to do a lot of reading. We had to identify what it was we liked about certain books and short stories. We had to pick out compelling conflicts in our real life and outline them as if they were the plot of a story: What's the issue? What's driving the conflict? Describe the characters, etc. In a lot of ways, it felt like visiting a therapist three times a week.

 

 

On the rare occasion we actually did get to write, it was like opening the flood gates. We would have a week to write a short story and turn it in. The instructor would read a select few out loud without naming the author. I can remember her choosing one of my stories one week and reading it to the class. I couldn't have been more proud or terrified as I recognized the title. I sank down in my chair and hoped for the moment to pass very quickly. When she was finished, she asked the class for their opinions. I was relieved when the cute girl I was hoping to have the nerve to talk to one day actually liked the story. I sat up taller. And then the guy who eventually ended up dating her raised his hand and let the class know that he didn't like it. It was too wordy and had way too much exposition. I was crushed, and when I had a chance to look up the definition of "exposition" later that day, I was angry. He couldn't have been right, could he?

 

 

It has been a couple of decades since that class, and I can easily recall what that guy didn't like about my story, but I can't for the life of me remember what that girl had liked about my story. As a result, as much as it hurt to hear, I have to say that the guy who didn't like my story did me a bigger favor than the girl. At the time, I saw it as a profound lapse of judgment on his part, but now whenever I write, I hear those words, "too much exposition," in my head, and I strip it down. I go with the bare minimum. So, he may have gotten the girl, but I got the point, and I'm a better writer for it.

 

 

When you get criticism on your writing, take some time to think about it before you react. The hardest thing you will ever do is separate yourself from your work and look at it objectively. We all feel that negative criticism is a personal attack at times, and occasionally it is, but your job is to grow as a writer. Growth comes with pain. View negative feedback as an opportunity to get better. If the criticism is specific, revisit the areas mentioned in the critique and read it as an editor. Do they have a point? Rewrite using the critics' suggestions and ask the editor in you if they indeed make the story better. The more you make the effort to incorporate the suggestions into your work, the more likely it is you'll be able to look at both versions objectively. You may determine that your first version was indeed better, but that's okay. At least you listened. Just remember, you may find that what you don't want to hear is exactly what you need to hear.

 

 

Have you ever received negative criticism on your work? How did you turn it into a lesson to make you a better writer? Share your experiences in the comments.

 

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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AAUGH! Rewrites!

Why Responding to Negative Reviews Can Hurt Your Marketing

2,386 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, reviews, reviews, writers, writers, review, review, writing, writing, craft, craft, criticism, criticism
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Way back when, I once worked in a marketing department for a small two-year college. When I say "way back," I mean a time when we'd all get absolutely giddy if we actually got an e-mail, or we'd curse a website that had images because it would take forever to display on our 45-pound monitors. In other words, in an ancient, distant time before e-commerce was a viable form of business and social media wasn't even a twinkle in Mark Zuckerberg's preteen eye.

 

In this time, advertising was done mostly though mainstream outlets: radio, television, and print. I was working with a graphic designer on a billboard when I learned an invaluable lesson in marketing and advertising that is still applicable for today's online media. We sat in a small conference room and brainstormed idea after idea. A lot of paper ended up in the trash can and gallons of coffee were consumed before we came up with an ad that made us both happy. It had lots of registration information, our school logo, and images of students having a fantastic time.

 

We handed the concept to our marketing director and she quickly shot it down. It was too busy, she said. We were devastated and on the verge of collapsing from an overdose of caffeine. "Tell us what you want," the graphic artist demanded. The marketing director very coolly said, "I want seven words or less, our logo, and no more than two students. Your priority is to sell our image in as few words as you can." Before we could protest, she smiled and asked "Got milk?"

 

She was reminding us of a simple rule we had forgotten in our effort to be creative and clever. People don't stop to read billboards. You have to assume that they are only going to have a few precious seconds to see your billboard as they race by in their car. The best way to get your message across is to not overload them with information and visual stimulation, which actually meant we had to be even more creative and clever to capture their attention. The graphic artist and I instituted a self-imposed rule from then on out: we would never again hand in anything for a billboard - or any other print ad concept - that had more than 10 items (pictures and words).

 

Today's billboards are banner ads. Traveling down the highway at 70 miles-per-hour is very similar to surfing the web. People aren't going to stop to read your banner ad. They have a high-speed internet connection because they want to travel from page to page quickly. The best way to get your message across is to treat a banner ad like a billboard. Try to stay within the rule of 10, including no more than 10 elements in your ad, including words, logos, and images. Remember, you're not creating an ad to sell your book. In a weird way, you're selling them on the banner ad itself. You have to give them a compelling reason to stop surfing and click on your ad. The act of doing so means they are open to your material and sales pitch at that point. Be creative, keep it short, and make it pop. My experience is that simplicity rules the day with any kind of advertising. The most successful ads have people saying, "That's so simple, why didn't I think of that?" To give you a jump start on developing a banner ad, here's an article that should help: 58 Online Copywriting Power Words & Phrases. After you draw them in, you will have more of an opportunity to get across all the information about your title.

 

Have you ever tried banner ads when marketing your work? What are your dos and don'ts for this form of advertising?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Synergy - Web 2.0 Style

Rice Milk Marketing Lessons

1,769 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, book, book, book, promotion, promotion, promotion, advertising, advertising, advertising, musicians, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     In Defense of Telling - Laura Pauling

Author Laura Pauling argues that "Show it, don't tell it" is a bit misleading. Sometimes you need to tell.


     How to Get Started Doing Your Own PR - BNET

The advice is meant for small business owners but authors and artist of every discipline should pay close attention to this post.



Film


     Going Bionic: Distributing Independent Films Internationally - Film Threat

There are more regional film festivals than you can shake a stick at. So which ones should you put on your short list? Film Threat shares its advice on the matter.


     5 Tips To Remember While Making A Film - sedentarismointelectual.com

How to tell a story on film and keep a lot of people employed in the process.



Music


     Twitter Overtakes MySpace as #3 Social-Networking Site - Paste Magazine

Believe it or not there was a time when MySpace was THE social network, especially for musicians. Now it's fallen to fourth place and could fall even further.


     Copyright Protection Only Costs $35 - Artists House Music

Ever wonder what it takes to copyright a song? Vanessa Kaster uncovers the mystery.



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 28, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 21, 2010 Edition

1,411 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, music, film, self-publishing, movies, writers, blogging, writing, musicians, filmmakers
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Past, Present, It's All Good...Or Is It?

Believe it or not, there is a controversy brewing in the literary world involving the use of present tense in novels. It seems that three of the nominees for this year's Man Booker Prize are (or were) written in the present tense. Some believe it's a bit too fashionable, which I think is the Brits' way of saying gimmicky. They think the trend of writing in the present tense is due to a lack of courage by the new crop of writers in the publishing world today.


Philip Pullman -- author of the bestselling series of young-adult novels "His Dark Materials" -- also jumped into the fray in the pages of the Guardian, blaming an aversion to the past tense on the "timorous uncertainty" of "sensitive and artistic storytellers" afraid of the "politically dodgy" implications of seeming to know too much about their own story: "Who are we to say this happened and then that happened? Maybe it didn't, perhaps we're wrong, there are other points of view, truth is always provisional, knowledge is always partial, the narrator is always unreliable, and so on."


You can read the entire article on Salon's website: The fierce fight over the present tense

 


Love Him or Hate Him, You Can't Deny He Is Prolific

Woody Allen may be a lightning rod for controversy, but he's also a prolific filmmaker. He cranks out a new film every year. They haven't all been winners, but a few are considered cinematic classics. With 46 film projects under his belt, he's got to have a sense for what works and what doesn't, right? Not necessarily. When asked if he thought his films would be better if he took more time to develop them, he answered:


"They wouldn't be better," Allen said matter-of-factly. "I have thought about that, yes, but they wouldn't be. When I've had time to do something, it doesn't come out better. There's no correlation between the time spent and how it comes out. It's really about the luck of a good idea. If you get a good idea you can execute it quickly. Kaufman and Hart, for example, wrote 'You Can't Take It With You' in two weeks."


You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: Woody Allen is already thinking beyond 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger'

 


Has the Internet Devalued Music?

U2's manager Paul McGuinness has been making a name for himself as of late not as the megaband's manager, but as an advocate for the little guys, those indie artists who are having a hard time making in it the music industry these days. McGuinness believes that music piracy is the single greatest reason for shrinking profits, and it's not bands like U2 that are affected. It's small independent bands that are paying the biggest price.


Artists cannot get record deals. Revenues are plummeting. Efforts to provide legal and viable ways of making money from music are being stymied by piracy. The latest figures from the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) shown that 95 percent of all music downloaded is illegally obtained and unpaid for. Indigenous music industries from Spain to Brazil are collapsing. An independent study endorsed by trade unions says Europe's creative industries could lose more than a million jobs in the next five years. Maybe the message is finally getting through that this isn't just about fewer limos for rich rock stars.


You can read the entire article on GQ's website: How to save the music industry


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 24, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 17, 2010

1,662 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, music, films
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Enjoy What You Write

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Sep 29, 2010

Why are the Twilight books so popular? I can speculate, and I will since this is my blog post. I have never read the books. I've tried. I bought the first one and couldn't get past page 100. I am making no judgment on Stephenie Meyer. I've lived long enough to know that tastes vary, and I'm not always going to agree with the majority. It is what it is. Just because I don't care for her style or the books doesn't mean they are bad.


I have several adult friends who are in love with the Twilight series and they know I am not a fan. They've tried to convince me that I should read them because I write young adult fiction. But reading a popular book to try and emulate it is a pointless endeavor. I'll explain why in a bit, but let's get back to my adult friends who read the Twilight books. When I ask them what they like about the novels, the most common response I get is "I don't know."


"The writing?" I ask.

"No, not necessarily," they answer.

"The story?"

"Not really. It's been done before. Awkward girl falls in love with the bad boy. Bad boy has a heart of gold. Awkward girl gets in trouble. Bad boy comes to the rescue. Awkward girl demonstrates a surprisingly strong side. Bad boy demonstrates a surprisingly tender side. It's kind of like Grease, but with vampires."

"The characters?"

"Hmmm, not particularly."

"There has to be something about the books you like. What is it?"

"They're just fun to read."


And that brings me to why one author can't effectively copy another author's success just by writing the same type of book. You have to enjoy what you write in order for someone to enjoy what they read. I can't explain it or prove it, but there is a magical element that occurs when writing from a place of utter absorption...from a place where you're no longer self-aware. You are simply enjoying the experience of telling the story. That can't be faked. It has to be genuine.


Those of us who write in the English language all use the same basic set of words and rules. Sometimes we even place the words in the same order on the page. So, writing well has to be more than using the language in a clever manner. Writing well isn't about writing at all. As corny as it sounds, it's about living the words on the page as you write them. It is a wholly metaphysical event.


So, maybe that does explain why the Twilight books are so popular. Maybe it's because Stephenie Meyer didn't write them at all. She lived the words.


Do you find that you enjoy storytelling so much that you actually forget you are writing?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Write What You Want to Know

A Self-Published Author's Tough Choices, and Having the Freedom to Make Them

1,810 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: books, authors, book, writers, writing, twilight, craft
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     The Hunger Games: A Fantastic Series And Lessons For Writers - The Creative Penn

It's quite possibly the most underrated series in young adult fiction today. Joanna Penn looks between the covers to see what makes The Hunger Games books so great.


     Should I do my own marketing? - MacGregor Literary

A first-time author asks agent Chip MacGregor if he should market his own book. My answer? You better believe it.



Film


     The Lost Art of the Comedy Short - Forces of Geek

The Three Stooges wowed and continue to wow the adolescent minded among us with their version of the comedy short. The question is why doesn't the comedy short work into today's world of the short attention span?


     The Independent Movie Budget That Works - Screenwriting Basics

When it comes to making a low-budget film, the best strategy is to base your budget on resources you have, not resources you want.



Music


     The Future of Rock and Roll - Inside Music Media

It's only commercialism in rock and roll, and I like it...or do I? Can merchandising save rock and roll?


     Are Artists More Pressured to Conform? - Hypebot.com

Are today's musicians setting trends or trying to follow them? Is success just a matter of conforming, or is the way of the rebel still they way of the rock and roll warrior?



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 21, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 14, 2010 Edition

1,655 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, music, music, film, film, self-publishing, self-publishing, movies, movies, blogging, blogging, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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My heart is heavy, and I'm feeling a little down. But at the same time, I'm feeling somewhat exhilarated. Allow me to explain. I've been working on a new book. Writing away day after day. Truckin' along without a care in the world. But two days ago, it all came to an abrupt stop.


You see, the book is broken up into three simultaneous but separate parts. They are interrelated in that they will all conclude at the same event. It's actually been a challenging and fun process tracking each part and making sure they all move toward the same conclusion at the same pace. But two days ago I sat down to rework the outline and read what I had written, and I realized one part isn't working. It's fine by itself, but mixed in with the other two parts it brings the story down. It doesn't ruin the book. It just keeps the story from being the best it can be.


I was faced with a choice. I could leave the story as-is and try to rework the part that was not making the grade, or I could cut that part all together. It's not an insignificant part. It's about 25-28 percent of the entire manuscript. I've decided to cut it. This means I've taken a huge step back in my writing schedule, but the payoff is that I'm moving the story ahead to a level that I'm happy with.


Such is the life of a self-published author. It's our responsibility to make the tough choices editors usually make in the traditional publishing world. We have to detach ourselves from the author part of us and tap into the critical part of us that makes a story better. Making these choices is painful and invigorating all at once; I have to let go of certain parts of the story and the hard work I put into them, but I now have the freedom to move in a new direction.


How about you? What tough editorial choices have you faced as a self-published author?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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AAUGH! Rewrites!

5 Tips for Instantly Improving Your Novel

2,135 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, self-publishing, writers, writing, craft
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     Killer Openings - Pub Rants

Most people don't keep reading a book with a weak opening to get to the good part. Agent Kristin explains what beginnings kill a book.


     Why self-imposed deadlines are the key to writing a book - Author Thought Leadership

Just because you're a self-published author doesn't mean you should throw away deadlines. Knowing when you need to end can be as useful as knowing where to end.



Film


     Filmmaker fluff puts pressure on 3D - Variety

So far 3D films have been vehicles for genre cinema. Is it too gimmicky for serious subjects?


     Guerrilla Filmmaking - No Such Thing As No Budget - Slice of Americana Films

Have you ever noticed that no-budget films usually cost money to make? Apparently no-budget doesn't always mean no-budget.



Music


     The Emotional Language of Chords - Music After 50

Ever wonder what harmonic function is? Wonder no more.


     3 Ways to Become a Music Marketing Ninja - Bob Baker's Buzz Factor

Want to become deadly effective marketing your music? Bob Baker can help you out.



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 14, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 7, 2010 Edition

1,999 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, blogging, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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I was running today, and I came to a hill...or bump...or slight incline (whatever you want to call it). It took a lot of effort to get my somewhat gelatinous frame over the hill, but it felt like I had accomplished something. I went on with my run, and while running home, I came back to the same spot. I sighed in relief as I realized I would be descending the hill because I was under the assumption that going downhill was easier. I took a few steps down the hill and discovered something. It seemed to take as much effort navigating the downgrade as it did navigating the incline. It was enough of a surprise to make me reevaluate all clichés.


Why do I bring this up? Because it made me think about writing and selling books, of course. When I was a first-time self-published author, I thought I had finished the hard part of the process when I completed the manuscript. I had gone uphill writing the book. I'd built and destroyed and rebuilt my story in order to get it to the point where it was coherent and, I felt, compelling. After all the work to perfect my book and get it on the market, I thought the hard part was over and I'd be able to just cruise downhill.


But what I found, just as I did when I was running, was that going downhill takes effort. You expend the same amount of energy as you do going uphill. Selling the book is as hard - in some cases, harder - than writing the book. I've talked to too many authors over the years who have elected to remain at the top of the hill because the effort to descend it was much more difficult than they anticipated.


For me, the hard part of selling books is learning entirely new skill sets. When I started, I didn't know anything about Web sites, social media, blogs, personal videos, etc. until I got serious about selling books. I studied the state of selling books, and it was clear the only way I was going to get down the hill was to put in the effort and teach myself the world of Web 2.0. What I found was that learning the virtual world isn't that hard. It's just a different form of what I already do: creating. Granted, finding enough time in the day sometimes has been really difficult, but devoting time to building my online presence is crucial enough that I have made some sacrifices and reprioritized my schedule. In other words, I'm devoting as much time and energy going down the hill as I am going up it these days, and I probably will for as long as I have books on the market.


What obstacles do you find most challenging when selling books, and how do you overcome them?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Selling the Self-Published Author with Kinetic Marketing

Outside-The-Box Ideas

2,182 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, running, promotions
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You Can't Love All the Parts of Your Story Equally

Author Orson Scott Card has a string of bestselling books to his credit, and he's a fan favorite among lovers of science fiction. He's known as a master storyteller with a flair for building strong and enduring characters. Recently, Card wrote an article about story structure for Writer's Digest magazine. What his philosophy?


All stories contain four elements that can determine structure: milieu, idea, character and event. While each is present in every story, there is generally one that dominates the others. Which one dominates? The one that the author cares about most. This is why the process of discovering the structure of a story is usually a process of self-discovery. Which aspect of the story matters most to you? That is the aspect that determines your story's structure.


You can read the entire article here: The 4 Story Structures that Dominate Novels



"I Really Want to Direct."

It's a refrain heard over and over again in acting circles. Many actors want to direct. The question is, why? Why do they want to give up the glamour of being in front of the camera for the responsibility and grind of being behind the camera and the script and the crew, etc.? What drives actors to become directors? The Boston Globe recently asked that very question.


Tony Goldwyn, who directed the upcoming film "Conviction" (about a Massachusetts woman, Betty Anne Waters, who helped free her wrongly convicted brother), says he started directing because he wanted to have more influence over his career and the projects he was interested in developing, a common refrain among actors-turned-director. As a rising young actor, he had watched his career heat up fast in the early '90s with films like "Ghost," but then struggled to land good material.


You can read the entire article here: Acting on an urge to be the director



Are You Ready to Rock?

Explore the career paths of some legendary musicians in Davis Guggenheim's new film, "It Might Get Loud." The film features Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White chatting it up about their lives as guitarists in rock-and-roll bands. What makes them tick? Is there a common thread that propels them? According to the Edge there is.


I guess what the three of us all have in common, for different reasons, is a restlessness. We're all trying to get at this unattainable sound in our heads. You need tension, something at odds with itself, to make good music. Whenever it's easy or straightforward, it's boring. It's why playing in a band is such a great thing, because everyone is after something different, which often takes you somewhere unexpected, which is usually the most interesting place of all.


You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: Wanna be a rock star? Career advice from Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White



-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 10, 2010

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - September 3, 2010

1,423 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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I read a plethora of screenwriting books years and years ago that led me to write 12 screenplays. None of them went anywhere (although, one sparked some interest and was very nearly sold), but the process of writing the screenplays taught me how to be a better storyteller. In other words, it wasn't wasted time.


I now find myself coming full circle. I have nine novel manuscripts under my belt (not all of them published), and I'm driven to take what I've learned writing long form to the screenplay world. Naturally, I'm planning on adapting one of my books to a screenplay. This is something I toyed around with before - and even met with a writing partner to help me get on my feet - but I wasn't able to wrap my head around the process.


I struggled with kicking the novelist out of my head. Whenever I typed "FADE IN" on the page, I'd immediately go over a mental checklist of things I thought should be included in the screenplay. The problem was, if I included everything on the checklist it would have been a five-hour movie.


However, something came to me earlier this week that may have cleared things up for me, a philosophy from one of the screenwriting experts I'd come across over the years. I can't remember his name or the title of his book, but his philosophy boiled down to this: a screenplay needs six good moments to be successful. I don't know if this is a universal truism among screenwriters, but it does give me some guideposts. I can throw away the mental checklist and find those six good moments in my novel to forge ahead. The six moments should be scenes or situations that represent the central theme of my book. That means, of course, that I need to know the central theme of my own book, and I do because I've developed a one sentence description for it. My task now is to find six scenes that support that one sentence description. Finally, I can silence the novelist in me to construct a screenplay that represents the heart and soul of my book without including every detail that I used to write the novel.


How about you? Have you attempted to adapt your book into a screenplay? Share your tips in the comments.


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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When Film Directors Know Movie Scripts Are Ready

Screenwriting - Know What's Happening Off Frame


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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


     The Difference between Mysteries, Suspense and Thrillers - Nathan Bransford

There are so many genres out there, so how can you tell one from the other? Nathan Bransford does his part to uncover the mystery.


     Can Writers Market Themselves Without Making Eyes Roll? - Jody Hedlund

There is a fine line between marketing yourself and bragging endlessly about yourself. The business of self-promotion requires a healthy dose of humility.

 

 

Film


     DIY Filmmaking: The Business Plan - Insane Ramblings of a Sane Madman

Filmmaker Devin Watson reminds us that filmmaking is a business - one that requires planning and professionalism to woo investors.


     The case against 3-D filmmaking - Move

Is 3-D a crutch to prop up poor storytelling? Why does Roger Ebert refer to the process as "suicidal" for the film industry?

 


Music


     17 Performance Tips I Learned the Hard Way - Judy Rodman

Did you know your voice needs your feet? Or, that a high protein meal can help your vocal performance?


     Elektra Records Founder on YouTube, Blogs and the Future of Music - Mashable

Mark Zuckerberg ruminates about the future of the music business and the importance of keeping experienced people in the mix to help the industry flourish.


 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - September 7, 2010 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - August 31, 2010 Edition

1,350 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, music, film, self-publishing, promotion, movies, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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What does rice milk have to do with marketing books? In my world, a lot. I live in a constant state of observation. I'm fascinated by how things work, particularly marketing. What drives an individual to buy one product over another product that's similar? More puzzling, what drives an individual to buy something altogether new?


My wife lives a dairy-free lifestyle. It is something she started by choice in her twenties. In her journey to find acceptable replacements for dairy, she came across rice milk years ago. The idea of it was repulsive to me, but she loved it. The biggest drawback for me was that it wasn't sold in the refrigerated aisle in my grocery story, and the packaging was akin to that of a large juice box. These were red flags to me that I would not like that product. In fact, I was afraid one taste of it would not only turn me off milk, but I also feared I would never be able to look at rice the same way again.


Then something happened while I was walking through my neighborhood grocery store a few weeks ago. It had a new kind of milk in the refrigerated aisle. It was a typical milk carton. It had an expiration date like the other milk. But oddly enough it was called rice milk. Rice milk? Refrigerated rice milk? Refrigerated rice milk in a real milk carton? Something clicked in my brain. I put it in my cart. Suddenly I was willing to try something new, something that had frightened me up to that point.


What changed my mind? It was the packaging and the placement. Something that had been a foreign concept to me before was now found in a familiar aisle looking like the other milk on the shelves. How does this help you as authors? Well, one, is your book in the right packaging? Is your cover not only aesthetically pleasing but appropriate for your genre as well? Two, are you in the right genre? Are you avoiding one genre because you're afraid to pigeonhole yourself?


If you're a new author, make yourself as familiar to your readers as possible. Packaging and placement are important ways you can get them to take a chance and buy your book. What this really comes down to is as an author you have to know not just your readers, but your genre as well. In other words, in order to reach milk drinkers, you have to look like milk. To reach readers of the thriller genre, give them a cover that fits in with that genre. If you have a book with overlapping genres, you have to make the hard choice and pick a primary genre. That will dictate your packaging. You're offering them something different and better in between the covers of your book, but if you don't get the packaging right, and if you don't pick the right genre, fewer readers will take a chance on your book.


By the way - the rice milk was delicious!


Anyone else have a real-life example of how packaging and placement have influenced your purchasing decisions, or the decisions of your customers?


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Your Cover is a Crucial Marketing Decision

Outside-The-Box Ideas

682 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, book, self-publishing, promotion, sales, publishing, promotions, branding, milk
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