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292 Posts tagged with the craft tag
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Lessons from a Great Book Jacket Designer - The Book Deal

Tips on how to make the cover of your book stand out.         

                           

Quit Being a Commodity: 10 Ways to Get Visibility and Stand Out - The Future of Ink

Is exclusivity the key to marketing success in publishing?        

 

Film

                                                        

Drones Are about to Change How Directors Make Movies - Wired

Do you have a better way to get that cool aerial shot?     

                                          

How to Achieve Your Filmmaking Goals Fast - Filmmaking Stuff

Start with giving yourself a deadline.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Mind-Expanding Music Marketing - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

How to push yourself and step up your marketing game.  

  

Learning to Sing Does Not Need to Take Hours a Day - How to Sing Better

Practicing a few key techniques just 15 minutes a day can make you a better singer.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- March 20, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- March 13, 2015

485 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, selling, music, design, book_design, author, promotion, indie, movies, writers, blogging, writing, films, promotions, music_marketing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, social_media, singing, book_covers, firecting
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Today I'd like to talk about tenses, specifically when to use the preterit (past) tense versus the pluperfect (past perfect) tense. While both tenses refer to things that have already happened, the pluperfect reference point is earlier than the preterit reference point.

 

Here are two examples:

 

Preterit tense: I wrote a book

Pluperfect tense: I had written a book

Both together: He wrote to me yesterday to tell me that he had read my book (he read my book before he wrote to me about it)

 

Past tense: Last year was hard for me

Pluperfect tense: Things had been hard for a while

Both together: It was hard to open the window because someone had nailed it shut (the window was nailed shut before I tried to open it)

 

I recently read a book that was written in the preterit tense. The problem was that the author kept using preterit and pluperfect tenses as if they are  interchangeable. This resulted in a bunch of sentences that sounded really strange and didn't make much sense together.

 

For example:

 

WHAT THE AUTHOR WROTE:

Things were now much more difficult. Over the last six months my disease progressed to the point where I was in constant pain.

 

WHAT THE AUTHOR SHOULD HAVE WRITTEN:

Things were now much more difficult. Over the last six months my disease HAD progressed to the point where I was in constant pain.

 

WHAT THE AUTHOR WROTE:

He knew what he needed to do. He fell in love with her, and it was time to tell her.

 

WHAT THE AUTHOR SHOULD HAVE WRITTEN:

He knew what he needed to do. He HAD FALLEN in love with her, and it was time to tell her.

 

Do you see the difference between the tenses? If you confuse your point of reference, you will confuse your readers. And you want your readers to be entertained, not confused!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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More Grammar Pet Peeves!
Solving the Mystery of Lie vs. Lay

1,644 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writing, craft, grammar, spelling, writing_advice, author_tips, grammar_tip, grammar_advice, writing_tip
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Don't Force an Ending

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 25, 2015

I just want to warn you that there's this little-known song from a movie that barely made any money at the box office that I'm going to reference in this blog post. It comes from an obscure animated flick called Frozen and the song title is "Let It Go." Oh, you've heard of it? Good, then I can spare you the video of me singing this catchy tune.

 

 

That is the wisdom I wish to impart on you today: let it go. Can't find an ending for that book you've worked so hard on for months? Let it go. What? You say it's been years? Let it go. Endings can't be forced. Well, they can, but they usually come off sounding that way. Your best strategy is to move on to the next project. Shed the frustrating missteps from your mind when it comes to finding the perfect ending, and redirect your creativity.

 

 

Albert Einstein didn't come up with the Theory of Relativity sitting in front of a chalkboard hammering out formulas and chasing mathematical equations down a rabbit hole. He came up with the idea as a clerk at the patent office staring out the window. In other words, he wasn't focused on revolutionizing physics. He was daydreaming. Had he been focused on making a great discovery at that particular moment, who knows, would he have developed the most famous scientific discovery of the modern age?

 

 

The ending will come to you when you let go of the need to find the ending. In a weird metaphysical way, stories don't like to remain unfinished. Your brain will find its way there on its own. If you force it, your brain will fight you and give your story an unsatisfying ending. Stop fixating, and start daydreaming. Let it go.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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When Do You Know The Ending?

Know Thy Story

1,501 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, book, writers, publishing, writing, craft, ending, writing_advice, writing_tip
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The Horoscope Prompt

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 18, 2015

I will admit to reading horoscopes. I don't necessarily take them seriously, and most of the time the predictions are so general they could apply to the first five random people I meet on the street, but they are fun to read. They are basically great little story prompts for writers.

 

Think about it. Horoscopes contain general descriptions of angst that a character may be experiencing. They hint at possible solutions to that angst. They may allude to the possibility of romance or the meeting of an important person in one's life. Or maybe there's the promise of an unexpected financial windfall. Horoscopes are fertile ground for the basic elements of a compelling story.

 

So, here is my challenge to you: take a week and track your daily horoscope and the horoscope for one other astrological sign. In essence, you're following the lives of two fictional characters. At the end of the week, take these 14 horoscopes and build a single synopsis for a story. Before you start, decide the genre of the story and bend the elements of the horoscopes to fit your style.

 

When you're done, you should have a page or two that gives a fairly detailed description of a story. You will likely have caught a creative wave in the writing and expanded upon what the horoscopes offered, but that's okay. That's how developing a story works. It grows in the telling.

 

Finding a story isn&'t that difficult. They are all around you if you take the time to look. In this case, they are figuratively in the stars.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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WordPlay: The Rum Runners' Retreat

WordPlay Writing Prompt: Diamond in the Rust

1,644 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, writing, craft, writing_advice, writing_excersises
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Writing Deadline Dos and Don'ts - Huffington Post

If you've set a deadline for your next release, here's how to reach it.     

                           

Twenty-one Fast Hacks to Fuel Your Story with Suspense - Writer's Digest

Author Elizabeth Sims tells you how to dial up the suspense.       

 

Film

                                                        

Five Filmmaking Lessons for Directors, DPs, & Those Working with Multi-Cam Setups - No Film School

Lessons on finding your camera's dynamic range.     

                                          

Why a Director Shouldn't Edit Their Own Film - Filmmaking.net

Collaboration is a valuable asset in filmmaking.  

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Musicians: Discover a Simple Way to Connect with Fans - Musicgoat.com

The smallest things can have the biggest impact. 

 

Marketing Lessons from Taylor Swift - Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

Bob Baker explains how indie musicians can learn a lot from Taylor Swift.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- January 16, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 9, 2014

1,346 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, music, filmmaking, author, self-publishing, promotion, indie, movies, writers, writing, films, suspense, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media, writing_advice
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Why Do You Write?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 21, 2015

As an author you often get the question, "How did you come up with that idea?" And for me it's impossible to answer. I have no clue where the ideas for my books come from. There are a few times I can pinpoint an origin to a story, but those times are few and far between. For me, it is much easier to answer another question I've gotten on a number of occasions: "Why do you write?"

 

Let me start by giving the reasons that don't come into play when I evaluate my desire to write. I was not born with an innate ability to write. I wrote just terribly in the beginning. It was embarrassingly bad. Over time I got better, but no reasonable person would have looked at my early stuff and recognized a genius hiding in my clunky prose.

 

I have no illusion that my writing will change the world. There are too many moving parts to this planet for me to believe that I can create a movement and open people's eyes to a new way of thinking. That is a power I don't want nor believe I can develop. That's not to say I don't think other writers can change the world. I absolutely think they can. I just don't think I'm one of those writers.

 

I write for one simple reason: I want to know what happens next. That's it. I'm internally bombarded with "what if" questions daily. You know those moments when you witness an everyday occurrence with a predictable outcome, and wonder what if something different happened? Those moments for me turn into a relentless curiosity, and I'm driven to explore where that "what if" scenario takes me.

 

That is why I write. I'm curious to know why you write. What motivates you to wake up every day and add words to the story in your head?   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Is Writing a Talent or a Skill?

Gaining Perspective When Writing

1,317 Views 5 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, self-publishing, indie, writing, characters, craft, writing_advice, author_advice
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Write Better: 3 Ways to Introduce Your Main Character - Writer's Digest 

How to create characters that the reader will not only like, but feel like they know, as well.           

 

How to Create an Effective, Engaging Video - Marketing Tips for Authors

Your author video must have a purpose to engage the viewer.     

                           

 

Film

                                                        

Three Reasons Why Great Directing Hinges on Prep Work and Pre-production - Norm Kroll

Going into production without being prepared can ruin a great film.     

                                          

How to Build Your Audience through Email - Filmmaking Stuff

Email is a good tool to use to build your audience.

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Six Resolutions All Musicians Should Make for 2015 - Hypebot.com

It all starts with knowing what you're getting into. 

 

What's Wrong with Your Vocal Warm-up? - Judy Rodman

Before you commit to doing vocal warm-ups before performances, make sure you're doing them right.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Weekly News Roundup- January 9, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 2, 2015

1,471 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, author, promotion, indie, movies, video, writers, writing, characters, films, promotions, directing, musicians, craft, social_media, character_development, author_marketing, film_audience, vocal_excersises
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Know Thy Story

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 14, 2015

I had the good fortune of being invited to a couple of writer's workshops this year. Both were enlightening and educational. I learned a lot from both the feedback I received and from listening to the other material that was presented. Beyond the exposure to different styles and genres, I got to see how other writers approach their work. The most edifying moments came when each author was asked to describe their stories. For the most part it was interesting, but there was the rare example of a few authors having no idea what their stories were about.

 

 

How could they not know what their own stories were about? I haven't a clue, but it was obvious. They started their description and then would meander off into a subplot, muddling the storyline so much that even they were too lost to get back to the main plot. When they'd finish their description, they'd invariably bark out, "Oh, I forgot..." and proceed to reveal a forgettable morsel of the story. They jumped from character to character trying to justify their existence. The reaction from everyone in the room shifted from attentive listening to polite head nodding to moving to the back of the room to see if any donuts were left.

 

 

Part of their befuddled delivery had to do with nerves, but part of it had to do with a lack of confidence in their main plot and its ability to carry a storyline. If you have no faith in the central theme of your story, you can't expect readers to demonstrate the faith for you.

 

 

If you're ever given the opportunity to discuss your book in public, know your story and have faith in your main plot. Don't veer off into sub-plots and minute character descriptions. Be concise and confident.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Character and Action

Write For the Story Not the Platform

1,904 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, self-publishing, writers, writing, public_speaking, event, craft, workshops, author_tips, author_appearance, book_events
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I can make you more creative and insightful with one word. It's not that I'm a wizard with special powers who can open your mind. I'm not an oracle who knows all and sees all. I'm just an observant writer who has learned a thing or two over the years. When some of you hear this word, you'll balk. You'll think me mad. And perhaps I am, but once you mull it over, you'll start to understand how this word is the key to being more creative. Enough of the buildup. This incredibly powerful word is "rules."

 

I know it's kind of anticlimactic, but I promise you rules will make you more creative. Years and years ago, I was working as a writer/producer on a corporate training video. After the client read the shooting script, she had two comments. She wanted the video to be shorter, and she wanted it to include more information. In other words, she wanted two diametrically opposed changes. I grumbled and groused when I first got her notes. I thought she was asking the impossible.

 

I was wrong. What she was doing was giving me a gift. I saw the project in a whole new light, and a switch went off in my brain. Suddenly, I knew the solution to work within her rules, and we ended up with a much better end product than we would have if we had stuck to the original concept.


Give your story restrictions before you sit down to write it. Your brain will go into overdrive to find a workaround that adheres to your rules, and in turn tell a story that is clear and innovative.


 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Pitch Test

Fix It in Rewrites

1,980 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, author, writers, writing, creativity, draft, writing_process, craft, creative_writing
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I hit a milestone this year in my publishing journey. The first novel I published was completed 10 years ago. How did I celebrate? I published a 10th anniversary edition of the book. While it is similar to the original, it is not the same book; there are significant differences.

 

Let me explain. About four years ago I spoke with an editor about releasing my first book traditionally. They loved the book, but they wanted major changes. Yeah, I'm not sure how that works either, but I took notes and then diligently did a rewrite incorporating the editor's "suggestions." I emailed the new version of the book to my agent and awaited my contract. After a couple of weeks, I got a figurative punch to the gut instead. The editor hated the changes. He thought I made the book worse and proceeded to send me on my way. My agent and a few other readers loved the new version, so we circulated it around and got some mild interest, but ultimately never got a contract offer. After getting the official word from my agent that there was nothing more he could do, I decided there was something I could do. I could self-publish it, and the timing couldn't have worked out better. I wrote the original in 2004, so I released the rewrite as the 10th anniversary, reimagined edition.

 

I was concerned that some readers may be upset that I was just trying to sell them the same book in different packaging, so I did a quick survey of readers to gauge demand and discovered that it would be well-received. I also used the author's note at the beginning of the new edition to explain why it existed.

 

How far are you into your publishing journey? Is it time to reimagine one of your early books? That's the beauty of the digital publishing age: alternate versions of books are not only feasible, they are starting to become commonplace. The comic book world has been releasing "alternate universe" versions of their storylines for decades. Why not novels? As long as you make enough changes to present a new story, retelling a story you've already told could be a viable publishing option.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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The Value of Rejection

Indie Freedom!

1,477 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, self-publishing, revisions, writing, launch, craft, book_launch_party, book_relaunch
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I did it. I participated in my very first NaNoWriMo. Well, more accurately, I kind of participated in NaNoWriMo. My project was nonfiction, and I had written 12,000 words prior to the November 1 start date. I essentially used the event to contribute 50,000 to my next book.

 

I have to say I found it utterly exhilarating. Getting up every day facing a new word count goal kept me hyper-focused on the book for 28 out of the 30 days. The first 14 mornings, after my coffee, of course, I sat at my computer and wrote 420 words. I then broke away and answered e-mails. Then I sat down to write 420 more words. Another break to tend to other work was followed by another 420-word writing session. The final 420-word session would come before dinner. Most days looked like this. The ones that didn't required slight adjustments due to other obligations. I took day 15 off and then broke my four sessions into 448 words each. I took one more day off and adjusted my word count sessions to make up for the lost time. In addition, I kept myself honest by updating my progress on my blog and Facebook every day.

 

I have written 12 books, but I have never done it with this much pressure before. I loved every minute of it. I am not finished by any stretch of the imagination. I have a very rough first draft that needs a lot of tender loving care, but thanks to NaNoWriMo, I have it in record time. If you have not participated in NaNoWriMo before, I would highly recommend it. Get ready for next November. I know I will be.

 

How was your experience with NaNoWriMo? Did you find, as I did, that the pressure helped keep you productive?

 

-Richard

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How to Get and Stay Motivated

Is the Early Bird More Creative?

1,254 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, timeline, writing, nanowrimo, national_novel_writing_month, craft
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We indie authors are a spoiled bunch. We are free to write and publish anything we want. Traditionally published authors are blocked from such freedoms. They are restricted in a lot of ways that don't apply to our freewheeling publishing lifestyle, including when their book is published. A lot of indie writers publish as soon as the final draft is done. Some authors follow a book release schedule. So which is the best approach?

 

I'm of the opinion that setting up a release schedule is the optimum strategy since there are constraints that no longer exist in today's publishing world. More than anything, scheduling allows you to plan for a release. You can get the word out in advance and build momentum heading into the release date.

 

 

Here are two things to consider as you create your release schedule:

 

  1. Pay attention to the seasons. Book sales tend to be slightly better in the winter and fall than in the spring and summer. That's not to say you should never release a book in the spring and summer. If you have a story with a spring and/or summer theme, you should take advantage of the tie-in.

  2. Speaking of tie-ins, if your book's theme centers on a holiday or an event, you should schedule your release to coincide with that holiday or event. A tie-in release provides a lot of natural marketing opportunities.

 

As indie authors we have unprecedented freedom when it comes to release of our books.  But, this is a business. You are better served if you plan a release using the methodology of your choice in order to maximize the impact on initial sales. 

-Richard                                                  

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Book Launch Sponsors

The Launch Party

1,634 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: selling, promotion, writing, book_marketing, promotions, launch, craft, branding, book_launch, book_release, _
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Lie vs. Lay

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Dec 9, 2014

I recently started taking a crazy fitness class at my gym. I like the instructor, but I secretly think he may be trying to kill us! I spend most of the class praying for it to be over, keeping one eye on the clock while trying not to fall off the medicine ball, or out of my plank, or messing up some equally torturous position.

 

When the time to catch our breath and stretch finally comes, I'm always thrilled. However, I often have a hard time relaxing right away because the instructor makes the same error every class: He says "Lay down on your backs," and it makes me cringe. (My yoga instructors often make this same mistake.)

 

Im not going point out my instructors error to him because hes not a writer. But I know this one can be confusing even for writers, so I thought it was worth explaining in my blog:

 

You LAY something else down. You LIE yourself down.

 

In the present tense, here are some examples:

 

Correct: I lay the fork next to my plate.

Correct: We lie down on our backs at the end of class and rest.

Correct: To end this war we must lay down our arms.

Correct: If we lie down and stay still, maybe they wont see us.

In the past tense, things get a little tricky. You LAID something else down. You LAY yourself down.

 

Correct: I laid the fork next to my plate.

Correct: We lay down on our backs at the end of class and rested.

Correct: To end the war we laid down our arms.

Correct: We lay down and stayed still, hoping they wouldnt see us.

 

In the present perfect and past perfect tenses, you HAVE LAID or HAD LAID something else down. You HAVE LAIN or HAD LAIN yourself down.

 

Correct: I have often laid the fork next to my plate.

Correct: We have lain down and rested on our backs at the end of every class.

Correct: To end the war we had laid down our arms.

Correct: We had lain down and remained still, hoping they wouldnt see us.

 

Im not going to lie; this can be a little confusing! But like all grammar, its also important. So lay down your pen and think about it before you put anything in ink.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Grammar Tip: She and I, Not Her and I

Grammar Tip: Don't Overcapitalize

1,627 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: author, writers, writing, craft, writing_advice, grammar_tip, grammar_advice
3

Last year, an old friend called me out of the blue. It had been ages since we'd talked, so I was thrilled to hear from him. He said he'd decided to write a novel and wanted to bounce the premise off me. Knowing how funny this guy is, I couldn't wait to hear his idea - and I wasn't disappointed. What he had in mind was hilarious. I told him as much, wished him the best, and said to keep me posted.

 

I emailed him on his birthday a couple months ago and asked how the novel was going. He said he'd written a couple chapters but had gotten sidetracked by other things, so it never really got off the ground. Needless to say, I was disappointed. But I wasn't surprised.

 

When it comes to writing a book, there's a huge difference between getting motivated and staying motivated. Crafting a novel is not something you can power through in an afternoon, like going for a run, or cleaning out the garage. It takes diligence and commitment, and a lot of hard work. But as we all know, it can be done.

 

How do I stay motivated when I'm working on a book? I set a daily quota for how many words I'm going to write (usually 1,000), and I don't go to bed until I've reached it. (I don't use weekly word targets because that only invites day-seven procrastination.) Some authors write every single day, whereas I write Monday through Friday. The key is to choose a schedule that works for you, then stick to it. If you respond well to rewards, then do something nice for yourself at the end of each week.

 

Quota and reward systems aside, when it comes to self-motivation, the term speaks for itself, i.e., it's entirely up to you. Just like no one is ever going to force you to run a marathon or hike the Inca Trail, no one is ever going to force you to write a book. As for my friend, for now it's just not that high on his list—and may never be. And that is completely fine! If it's high on your list, however, then do it. You won't regret it. I promise.

  

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Productivity vs. Perfection

Writing Takes Discipline

4,547 Views 3 Comments Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, writing, advice, motivation, craft, branding, writing_tips, writing_advice
2

For an upcoming release, I used a fairly large group of beta readers before my final round of rewrites. Now, the dangerous thing about using beta readers is that you're selecting readers who are fans of your previous books. In the wrong environment, these readers may be reluctant to give you their honest opinions in an effort to stay in your good graces. So, I decided to give this group of beta readers the ability to provide feedback anonymously. I set up a survey with 13 elements of the book that they could rate on a scale of 1 to 5. I also gave them the option to leave a comment on each element they were asked to rate. In addition, they could leave a comment at the end of the survey to give their overall impression of the book.

 

This system worked beautifully. I got a lot of constructive feedback that helped tremendously during the final round of rewrites. The key for me was to know what needed to be addressed. Of the 13 areas, eight would only apply to my story, but five could be used for almost any book. I'll share them here, and I invite you to use them should you decide to use this method with beta readers.

 

  1. Character: Please rate main and secondary characters as a whole. (I went on to describe my style of revealing character)

  2. Plot: Besides being the catalyst for action and dialog, the plot has to be worth investing time in and has to be delivered in a compelling manner. Given all that, how would you rate the execution of the plot?

  3. Setting: The setting is a small fictional Southern town at the base of an unknown mountain range in Tennessee. Various other communities featured in the book are located on the slopes of those mountains. The author attempted to establish a ruggedness and sense of isolation both in the terrain and through the secondary characters of these small communities. Based on these criteria, how would you rate the setting of this book?

  4. The Final Conflict: The final conflict takes place in?(a location specific to my story). At the conclusion of this scene, readers should not have any remaining questions about the main plot: who was involved, the extent of the crime committed, and the plan to address it moving forward, etc. Based on these criteria, how would you rank the final conflict?

  5. The Ending: How would you rank the ending?

 

Together with the other eight questions in the survey, I was able to address problem areas. Having so much input before the release of a book has really set me at ease. I'm usually a bundle of nerves just before a book goes live, but now I'm more confident than I've ever been about a new book. And, I wouldn't feel this way without my beta readers.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

 

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