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280 Posts tagged with the filmmakers tag
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There's no doubt that volume is a key component in driving traffic to your blog. Part-time blogs are fine if it's just a vanity project. Posting on your blog whenever the mood strikes is great for getting things off your chest, but it doesn't do a lot to expose your personal brand to a large number of people. My recommendation is to find the time to blog once a day. That may sound outrageous, and it can be a little daunting in the beginning, but like anything that takes commitment, it will get easier to do over time.

 

The number one way to increase your blogging activity is to read other blogs and news sites daily. Work it into your morning routine. Pour yourself a cup of coffee or tea and browse the web for stories that strike your fancy. Here are some sites that provide links to the top stories of the day or their own unique commentary on the current headlines.

 

Alltop - The word Alltop is taken from "All Topics," and that's what Alltop is: a collection of websites and blogs that cover a wide range of topics. They provide a variety of categories for you to choose from. Once you select a category, you'll be directed to a page with links to blogs and websites that cover the topic you selected.

 

BoingBoing - This is a website started by science fiction author Cory Doctorow as a side project. It has since grown into a full-fledged source of news and information covering topics such as technology, gadgets, culture, games, entertainment, science, business, art and design, video, and more.

 

Mashable - Think of Mashable as all things technology. Want to know when the next greatest thing in social media is coming out? Mashable will probably be the first to report it. Want to know who the new YouTube star is or the latest author to make the most of new media strategies? Mashable will most likely be the first to bring them to your attention.

 

There are plenty of other sites to choose from, but these are the ones I utilize most. If the top stories of the day are what interest you most, you can visit sites like Yahoo.com and MSN.com for a list of the biggest news stories. Whichever sites you visit most often, use them to ignite the blogger inside of you and spend about 30 minutes a day writing a post for your own blog.

 

Which blogs do you read most often and why?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Short and Long of Blog Posts

Need to Blog, but Short on Time?

1,961 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, blog, blog, blog, promotion, promotion, promotion, blogging, blogging, blogging, musicians, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, filmmakers, branding, branding, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Challenges of Being a Newly-Published Author - Self-Publishing Review

Self-published author David Crowley explores the difficulties and complexities of having a second title on the market.

 

Writing Workshop: The Ransom Note Version - Los Angeles Times

And now for something completely different...and fun! A writing workshop like no other.

 

Film

 

Indie Filmmakers Must Operate Like Small Businesses to Succeed - Examiner

It may sound obvious, but it is worth repeating. You may be involved in an artistic endeavor, but filmmaking is still a business.

 

DSLR Film-making with Philip Bloom - cnet

Philip Bloom is one of the premiere DSLR filmmakers out there today, and he's dishing out some of his secrets of the trade.

 

Music

 

Singing While Playing (at the Hard Part) - Music After 50

It's a little bit harder than walking and chewing gum at the same time. Judy Rodman gives her tips on how to sing and play at the same time.

 

How Can You Drive Your Fans From Offline to Online? - music think tank

Having a real world gig is great, but how do you get those attending your show to visit your website and download your music?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 15, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 8, 2011 Edition

1,458 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, filmmaking, filmmaking, promotion, promotion, writers, writers, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, singing, singing
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I'll admit to being confused about the optimal word count for an average blog post. I am of the mindset that people today have a short attention span, and it's easy for them to pass on a lengthy blog post and move on to another blog. I personally have a short attention span that is scared away by lengthy posts. If the writing is exceptional, I may stick it out, but my general response to long blog posts is to run away screaming into the virtual world.

 

On the other hand, too many short posts can give your blog the appearance of being frivolous and forgettable. Short posts are tempting because they're easy and less time-consuming, but they do very little in helping you establish an effective personal brand. On my personal blog, I have posted very short posts, but I try to spread them out between more substantial posts.

 

So what is a good blog post length? My experience as both a reader and writer of blogs is that posts between 250 and 600 words are best. Some will say that you can go as long as 1,000 words, but I personally think that's overdoing it. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) experts have found that posts that hit the 250-word range are ranked higher than blog posts that are shorter or longer. Don't beat yourself up if you fall short of that mark or if you go over. Just use it as a benchmark as you write. If you have something to say that is significantly longer, consider breaking it up into a series of posts.

 

Writing blog posts is certainly more art than science. Just write within your comfort zone, and over time you'll find your rhythm and hit the word count that fits your style and schedule. The primary objective is to use the blog to build your personal brand. Have fun with it and blog away.

 

(Fun fact: the body of this blog post - minus this sentence - is 319 words!)

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Authors' Four Structural Essentials for Blogs

Need to Blog, but Short on Time?

200 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, blog, promotion, blogging, musicians, filmmakers, branding
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The Unfinished Works of Genius

 

We've all been there: you work and work and work on a new manuscript. You connect with the characters, and you have moments of absolute elation at certain bits of dialogue or twists you create along the way. But then something goes wrong. Either the story derails, or you lose the enthusiasm you once had for the material. You stop working on the book and sometimes you don't even know why. The New York Times explored the phenomenon recently.

 

Authors, always sensitive creatures, might abandon a book in a fit of despair, as Stephenie Meyer initially did in 2008 with her "Twilight" spinoff "Midnight Sun," which she declared herself "too sad" to finish after 12 chapters leaked to the Internet. More dramatically, in 1925 Evelyn Waugh burned his unpublished first novel, "The Temple at Thatch," and attempted to drown himself in the sea after a friend gave it a bad review. (Stung by jellyfish, Waugh soon returned to shore.) More dramatically still, Nikolai Gogol died a mere 10 days after burning the manuscript of "Dead Souls II," for the second time.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Why Do Writers Abandon Novels?

 

The Lines Keep On Blurring

 

Multimedia strategies are here. Games are being turned into films, and films are being turned into games. Technologies are creating more and more opportunities for filmmakers to earn money for their films, even if they do it in the video game world. How much have the lines blurred? The Tribeca Film Institute has created a grant to fund films that wed with new media.

 

The idea, says the group, is to let filmmakers and game makers better showcase works that go hand in hand together. "One of the things we want to do with this is connect people," says Beth Janson, executive director of the Tribeca Film Institute tells Gamasutra. "We want to connect filmmakers with developers who understand the two worlds. That's what's exciting about this. These two worlds are coming closer and closer together. We definitely want to encourage those sorts of actions."

 

You can read the entire article on Gamasutra: Interview: Why The Tribeca Film Institute Turned Its Attention To Gaming

 

Addicted to Celebrity Swag

 

It seems we admire...like...love our celebrities so much that we want to own their stuff. And we don't just want their stuff. We want their well-used, unclean stuff. We can't help it. We deem an object more personally valuable if it was actually used by a celebrity, and for some reason, we want our celebrities to be slovenly enough to not wash their belongings before they put them up for auction.

 

The most important factor seemed to be the degree of "celebrity contagion." The Yale team found that a sweater owned by a popular celebrity became more valuable to people if they learned it had actually been worn by their idol. But if the sweater had subsequently been cleaned and sterilized, it seemed less valuable to the fans, apparently because the celebrity's essence had somehow been removed. "Our results suggest that physical contact with a celebrity boosts the value of an object, so people will pay extra for a guitar that Eric Clapton played, or even held in his hands," said Paul Bloom, who did the experiments at Yale along with George E. Newman and Gil Diesendruck.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Urge to Own That Clapton Guitar Is Contagious, Scientists Find

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 11, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 4, 2011

1,408 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, filmmaking, filmmaking, writers, writers, writing, writing, manuscript, manuscript, multimedia, multimedia, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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A Different Kind of Posting

 

An unknown writer in New York has decided to serialize his book by posting it one page at a time. I call that a fairly extreme tactic. What makes it more extreme is he isn't posting the pages on the internet; he's posting it on lampposts. Yes, you read correctly. Lampposts in New York's East Village are playing host to a single page from the unknown writer's book. Not everyone is a fan of the idea.

 

Although no author has yet publicly taken credit for the work, the East Village had no shortage of opinions about it. "Honestly, I don't like the idea. I hate it when people just post things everywhere," said Joe Curanhj, 42, owner of Stromboli Pizza, located right in front of the lamppost bearing Page 8. "They have the Internet, why don't they use that?"

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Post's website: 'Light' reading

 

Why Studios are Giving First-Time Directors $100,000,000+ Budgets

 

There was a time when Hollywood studio execs wanted their first-time directors to cut their teeth on small-to-modest budget films. It made sense. They didn't know what a new director was actually capable of, so they were cautious. But times have changed. Today, first-time directors are getting big budget films as their first gigs. Some budgets are even approaching $200 million. Why the change in philosophy?

 

During the past five years, though, technology has enabled rookie directors to hone their skills via FinalCut Pro, digital-video cameras and other state-of-the-art effects tools from a young age, prompting budget-cautious studios to salivate over what they can put on screen for a price. Gareth Edwards, for instance, made his indie sci-fi film Monsters for a few hundred thousand dollars, even though it looked much more expensive. He's now up to direct Godzilla for Warner Bros.

 

You can read the entire article on The Hollywood Reporter's website: Why the Studios Are Trusting Untested Directors for Major Jobs

 

All of a Sudden, Investors are Flocking to Digital Music Companies

 

Most articles you read about companies offering digital music downloads focus on their inability to make much of a profit. Finding investors for these companies has never been easy. Until now. For reasons unknown or not quite understood by many experts, investors are pouring some big money into some of these companies. Needless to say, it's a welcome development for most.

 

But more bullish investors point to technological developments and shifts in consumer behavior as signs that the business is about to turn a corner. These changes include the migration of digital media libraries from personal computers to the remote storage of the "cloud," as well as the explosive success of smartphone applications.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Investors Are Drawn Anew to Digital Music

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 4, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 25, 2011

1,342 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, digital, digital, directing, directing, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Blogging is Ripe for the Picking

 

It seems sites like Facebook and Twitter are quelling today's youth's desire to keep and maintain blogs. They don't have the time to tweet, update their Facebook status, text, IM and blog. Something had to give, and blogs are what they've decided to ditch. This could mean the blogosphere is about to get a lot less crowded. With fewer blogs jamming the information superhighway, some of the traffic may get diverted to those of us who are committed to blogging.

 

The Internet and American Life Project at the Pew Research Center found that from 2006 to 2009, blogging among children ages 12 to 17 fell by half; now 14 percent of children those ages who use the Internet have blogs. Among 18-to-33-year-olds, the project said in a report last year, blogging dropped two percentage points in 2010 from two years earlier. Former bloggers said they were too busy to write lengthy posts and were uninspired by a lack of readers. Others said they had no interest in creating a blog because social networking did a good enough job keeping them in touch with friends and family.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Blogs Wane as the Young Drift to Sites Like Twitter

 

Canada's Queen of Independence

 

Ingrid Veninger has turned her filmmaking passion into a family affair. She's written, produced and directed a movie starring her son and another one starring her daughter. But these aren't home movies shot in an effort to trick her kids into spending fun family time. These are honest-to-goodness features that have been doing well in the film festival circuits.

 

Eight years ago, she started her own company, pUNK Films, with the ambitious motto "Nothing is impossible." The company has already made six shorts and four feature films, including Only and Modra. She made Only, starring her son, Jacob, as a boy who has a chance encounter with a girl at a motel in Parry Sound, Ont., for $20,000 by maxing out four credit cards. She used a borrowed digital camera, and everyone in the cast and crew was paid a flat fee of $100. She submitted a DVD to the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) where audiences and reviewers were enthusiastic. Invitations to other festivals followed.

 

You can read the entire article on The Global and Mail's website: Ingrid Veninger: the DIY queen of Canadian filmmaking

 

The Record Store That's Bucking the Odds

 

Record stores are relics of the past, right? There's just no room for them in today's Web 2.0 world, right? They're romantic constructs of yesteryear, right? Wrong. Believe it or not, some record stores are doing quite well even in an economy that's fueled by ecommerce. In fact, one indie record store in Long Beach, California just moved into a new storefront that doubled its square footage.

 

Someone apparently forgot to tell store owner Rand Foster that people pluck their music from the clouds now, rather than exchange cash for it in bricks-and-mortar emporiums such as Fingerprints. Not only has Foster's indie venture survived 18 years of a drastically changing retail environment, but the soft-spoken entrepreneur also just doubled Fingerprints' footprint, moving to this space two times bigger than its longtime Belmont Shores home. His key? Making the store a destination for a devoted clientele. "It's not memorable where you buy the record on top of the charts," Foster says. "When you buy something you've never heard of that becomes a favorite record, or you buy a record you've been looking for 10 years, you remember that store."

 

You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: Fingerprints record store: Thriving despite music industry woes

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 25, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 18, 2011

1,353 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, cd, cd, indie, indie, blogging, blogging, filmmakers, filmmakers, branding, branding
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Self-publishing and Social Networking - Self-Publishing Review

Self-published author Myne Whitman finds an unexpected side-effect to her social media strategy for her book. She's become addicted to Facebook.

 

More Books Published Every Year Due to POD and Digital Publishing - Teleread

The book industry continues to grow due to more and more independent books being published each year.

 

Film

 

Creative Kids Making Films - Fox 23 News

Youth FX is a program that is introducing filmmaking to inner city kids, and their films are opening to packed houses.

 

The Lazy Actor - Shoot Yourself (with a camera silly) - ACTORSandCREW

Actress Mercedes Rose discusses how the internet is opening up more opportunities for actors. Her advice for fellow actors? Invest in a flip camera.

 

Music

 

10 Music Marketing Insights - Music Producers Forum

The internet is full of marketing opportunities for independent artists. Are you taking advantage of them?

 

Your Story: A Powerful Way to Connect with Music Fans - The Buzz Factor

Musicians can sell their music by making personal connections with fans, not just through the music, but through personal stories on their blogs and social media sites.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 22, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 15, 2011 Edition

1,304 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, marketing, marketing, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, self-publishing, self-publishing, pod, pod, filmmakers, filmmakers, social_media, social_media
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The Growing Power of Self-publishing

 

Evidence continues to grow showing self-publishing may not just be a viable alternative to traditional publishing, but it may actually be the preferable option. The hurdle to distribution now no longer an issue, many self-published authors are finding great success selling books, particularly ebooks. The latest superstar among the self-published is Amanda Hocking.

 

By May she was selling hundreds; by June, thousands. She sold 164,000 books in 2010. Most were low-priced (99 cents to $2.99) digital downloads. More astounding: This January she sold more than 450,000 copies of her nine titles. More than 99% were e-books. "I can't really say that I would have been more successful if I'd gone with a traditional publisher," says Hocking, 26, who lives in Austin, Minn. "But I know this is working really well for me."

 

You can read the entire article on USA Today's website: Authors catch fire with self-published e-books

 

Selling Wine to Make Movies

 

Believe it or not, Francis Ford Coppola believes the Godfather films sidetracked him from the type of career he really wanted in film. The success of the first film in the trilogy made Coppola a hot commodity in Hollywood. The problem was he found himself being asked to make films he didn't want to make. His solution? Retreat to his winery, make some dough with his Coppola-brand wine and self-finance the films he wants to make.

 

You try to go to a producer today and say you want to make a film that hasn't been made before; they will throw you out because they want the same film that works, that makes money. That tells me that although the cinema in the next 100 years is going to change a lot, it will slow down because they don't want you to risk anymore. They don't want you to take chances. So I feel like [I'm] part of the cinema as it was 100 years ago, when you didn't know how to make it. You have to discover how to make it.

 

You can read the entire article on The 99%: Francis Ford Coppola: On Risk, Money, Craft & Collaboration

 

Opera Goes 3D

 

You know what would make theatre more real? Three dimensional images. I know the people on stage are already in three dimensions, but that's so 2010. What the black tie crowd really wants at the opera is Hollywood 3-D type effects. Or so Robert Lepage, director of "Siegfried," believes. In fact, he's banking on it.

 

Its use at the Met, so far, will be limited to forest scenes in "Siegfried." It will not be employed in the final work of Wagner's cycle, "Götterdämmerung." Inevitably, it will give more ammunition to Wagnerites and critics who view Mr. Lepage's sophisticated electronics as a distraction from the drama and the music. Peter Gelb, the Met's general manager, said the 3-D effect only "adds to the visual elements" of Mr. Lepage's "Ring." Mr. Gelb said he was sensitive to the perception that technology was driving the "artistic product." In this case, Mr. Gelb asserted, "technology is in the service of art."

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: 3-D Comes to Met Opera, but Without Those Undignified Glasses

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 18, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 11, 2011

1,430 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, books, books, authors, authors, filmmaking, filmmaking, self-publishing, self-publishing, e-book, e-book, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Business Rusch: Beginning Writers Again - Sort Of - Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Rusch is finding it harder and harder to advise first-time authors to pursue traditional publishing. She now believes self-publishing may be the way to go.

 

Things You Can Do if Your Book is Not Selling So Well - A Newbie's Guide to Publishing

Sometimes your promotions may not be the problem. Sometimes it may be the book itself, or at the very least, elements of the book.

 

Film

 

Lost In Sunshine's Explosive Transmedia Campaign on IndieGoGo! - For the Love of Indie Filmmaking

Looking for an explanation of transmedia? This video gives a pretty good description, and showcases how other indie filmmakers are trying to raise money.

 

Film-making Fans vs. Film Fans - Angelo Bell

I found this to be an interesting topic for debate, as it's a comparison that could cross all art forms. Do you make art for other artists or for the fans?

 

Music

 

What a Piano Can Teach a Voice - Judy Rodman

As a rule, people practice their piano skills more than their vocals. Adopting the piano-practicing strategy for your voice training will help you make huge strides as a singer.

 

Practicing On Purpose - Getting There

Do you plan your practice sessions or do you just wing it? You may get more out of practice if you go in with a purpose.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 15, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 8, 2011 Edition

1,354 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, self_publishing, authors, authors, selling, selling, filmmaking, filmmaking, self-publishing, self-publishing, writing, writing, fans, fans, musicians, musicians, craft, craft, filmmakers, filmmakers, singing, singing, transmedia, transmedia, practice, practice
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An Immortal Life Reveals a Big Heart

 

For 50 years, the medical research and pharmaceutical industries have made millions of dollars off the incredibly durable cancer cells of one woman, Henrietta Lacks. Neither she nor her family has ever received a dime for her contribution to science. She was never even asked if her cells could be used for research. Enter author Rebecca Skloot and her book about Henrietta's unique story, "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks." Skloot is making sure Henrietta's family is finally receiving some compensation.

 

Soon after the book came out, she created the Henrietta Lacks Foundation to help Mrs. Lacks's descendants, some of whom suffered from the whirlwind of publicity, misinformation and scam artists surrounding HeLa cells, not to mention a lack of insurance to pay for any of the medical advances Mrs. Lacks's cells made possible. "I first envisioned it as a foundation for education, but I realized that the people who were affected the most were her kids, and they needed some medical care and dental care," Ms. Skloot said from her home in Chicago.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Returning the Blessings of an Immortal Life

 

Here's Looking at Humphrey Bogart, Kid.

 

He'd swagger in front of the camera and deliver a line with that haunting affect of his, and you knew immediately he was a man's man, a tough guy through and through. He even managed to play a screenwriter in a movie and make him the toughest guy in the room. What was it about Humphrey Bogart that made him so imposing?

 

By the time his film breakthrough came, he was 42 and already wearing the vestiges of betrayal, loss and resignation that would bring the shadow of a back story to every role he played. Photographs of Bogart in the 1920s, when he was in his 20s, show a bright-eyed, smooth-cheeked actor whose features haven't set yet. The transformation took place before we made his acquaintance. The Bogart we came to know on the screen was mature when he arrived, with compressed emotions, an economy of gesture and a compact grace in movements that were wary and self-contained, as if all the world were not a stage but a minefield.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Here's Looking at Him

 

How to Be a Hit Maker

 

Ever wonder what it takes to make it in pop music? How to collect more Grammys than you have shelf space? Produce one hit after another that turns into prestige and cash and more cash? I've wondered that, and I'm not even a musician. Music producers RedOne, Alex Da Kid and Ari Levine discuss their secrets to creating hits.

 

On Saturday evening in front of a sold-out crowd, Powers led a freewheeling conversation that sought to put into words the magic that turns a bunch of notes on paper (or, these days, a hard drive) into a hit song. "I think the most important thing is having a vision. Being able to see things before other people can see it," Alexander Grant - better known as Alex Da Kid - told the audience inside the Grammy Museum's Clive Davis Theater. "Most of the songs you're working on, they won't even come out for three or four months at least, maybe longer, so you have to be able to think what's going to be a hit record in six months."

 

You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' website: From an idea to a single: RedOne, Alex Da Kid and Ari Levine discuss making hits

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 11, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - February 4, 2011

1,434 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, music, music, films, films, producers, producers, actors, actors, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Opening No Nos - Kill Zone

Are you rebellious enough to break literary taboos? Nothing is set in stone, but according to this article, some things can definitely sink your novel.

 

If You Won't Have a Blog, Don't Bother Sending Us Your Manuscript - FUTUReBOOK

It seems some traditional publishers are turning away writers who aren't social media mavens.

 

Film

 

Destructible Wall: DIY - Indy Mogul

Need to punch a wall for your next movie...or Super Bowl? The crew at Indy Mogul can show you how to do it without breaking your hand.

 

5 Pitfalls of a Remake - a MOON brothers film

Say you've been handed the script for the remake of Weekend at Bernie's. Would you know how to handle reshooting a classic like that?

 

Music

 

The Real Life of a Musician - Getting There

Being a musician isn't all glitz and glamour...unless you're in a glam rock cover band. But even then dues must be paid.

 

When a Hobby Becomes a Job - eleetmusic

Do what you love and the money will follow...maybe.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 8, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 1, 2011 Edition

1,583 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, film, film, blog, blog, promotion, promotion, musicians, musicians, craft, craft, filmmakers, filmmakers
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The word "tweet" has taken on a whole new meaning in the daily lexicon. Before, it was the lovely sound our feathered friends made while they soared through the skies or perched in the trees. Now, it's what we humans do to try and get noticed on the social networking platform called Twitter. To tweet is to post a compelling 140-characters-or-fewer message to let your followers know what's on your mind.

 

But the tweet has one glaring flaw: only your followers will see it. Since your goal in social media is to get noticed far and wide, you need to find a way to reach past your followers and make your tweets viral. You have to find a way to go beyond the tweet and enter the realm of the retweet.

 

A retweet is when someone shares your tweet with their followers and lists you as the original poster. In short, it gives you credit for share-worthy material, helping you gain more exposure and maybe increasing your follower base. While you can't predict what will be retweeted, you can increase your chances by employing a few simple strategies to your tweeting approach.

 

1. Quotes - Quotes are some of the most often retweeted pieces of content. Whether it's a funny, inspirational, or moronic quote, people love to share a finely crafted one with their followers. If you've written a book about a particular subject matter, find quotes that pertain to the subject of the book. The same goes for your favorite hobby, your profession, or your political persuasion. If a quote captures your attention, chances are it will capture your followers' attention as well.

 

2. Useful content - Post a link to an article, video, or blog post that you find funny, compelling, or informative. If you're the creator of the content, all the better, but it's not necessary that you link to only your original content. Share the things on the web that move you for one reason or another. The like-minded people amongst your followers may be moved to share it by retweeting.

 

3. Newshound - Stay on top of the events of the day and be one of the first to post links to breaking news stories. Twitter has become a primary source of news and information for millions of people. Why not be a part of their conduit of resources?

 

4. Be grateful - If someone takes the time to retweet you, thank them. It's not just common courtesy; it's good common sense. If they feel appreciated for their efforts, they're more likely to retweet you again.

 

5. Retweet others - If you see something on Twitter that you'd love to share with your followers, retweet it. The person you retweeted may feel compelled to return the favor at some point. Don't be shy about sharing the wisdom of those you follow with your own followers.

 

Retweeting is definitely more art than science; there is no way to ensure that every time you tweet in a specific way you will be retweeted. However, taking some of these suggestions may lead to an increase in the number of times you are retweeted. And once your tweets go viral, your channel for future word-of-mouth campaigns will grow. Good luck and happy tweeting!

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Social Networking Tour - Twitter

Social Networking Sells Your Brand

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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Laura Hillenbrand Teams with NPR for Month-Long Social Media Event - PWxyz

Talk about using social media to promote your book. Laura Hillenbrand goes all-in to get the most out of the emerging media.

 

Saving Salinger - The Millions

Writer Kristopher Jansma rediscovers his favorite author in two unpublished stories but ultimately feels frustrated because he cannot share them with the rest of the world.

 

Film

 

How Filmmakers Can Best Handle Criticism - Illiterary Fiction

How to deal with know-it-alls who rain on your parade? Just be H.O.P.E.F.U.L.

 

When Surprise Becomes Dramatic Irony - A Moon Brothers Film

Surprising an audience isn't always the best storytelling element to use in your film. It could backfire.

 

Music

 

Music Makers in the Changing Music Business - Judy Rodman

Judy chats with master session bass player Mike Chapman about the changing face of music and its impact on the musicians.

 

Modes are Notes, Chords That Create Unique Effects - Music After 50

Do you know the difference between a mode and a chord? Chuck Anderson clears up confusion surrounding modes.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - February 1, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - January 25, 2011 Edition

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At about this time last year, I provided in this blog a list of five daytime talk shows that you should check out to promote your book, film, or music. You can click here, Finding a Daytime Talk Show, to see the shows on that list. You'll find that I've provided a link to the shows' websites so you can poke around and see which shows might be the right fit for you. Since there seems to be a never-ending supply of TV talk shows, I decided to put together a new list for you. Like last year's list, these are shows that cater to a national TV audience. Some are general-interest programs, and some shows stick to a single topic like health or crafts.

 

The Tyra Show - I must admit I have never watched a single frame of this show hosted by Tyra Banks, but there is no denying its wild popularity with women and young people. The show hits on topics ranging from body image to the totally outlandish and bizarre. If you have a book or film that veers from the mainstream, this might be the perfect show for you.

 

Rachael Ray Show - Rachael was cut from the cloth of the master herself, Oprah. She's adorable. She's vibrant. She's destined for daytime TV stardom. She specializes in cooking and crafts, but she also branches out into general-interest topics from time to time.

 

Live With Regis and Kelly - It's true that television staple Regis Philbin just announced his pending retirement, but that doesn't mean the show won't go on. They retooled when Kathie Lee left, and I'm sure they'll do the same when Regis signs off, despite his legendary status. The show can be described in one word: fun. If you need more words: slightly wholesome. They focus a lot on celebrities, but they also highlight human interest stories.

 

The Doctors - Think of this show as The View for medical and health issues. It's a panel of honest-to-goodness doctors discussing topics that cover the health spectrum. If you've got a book or even a documentary that falls within this realm, give them a shot.

 

The View - Speaking of The View...They seem to love topics that are either controversial or centered on women's issues. If you have a book or film that pushes the envelope and can get the hosts worked up into an all out chat-fest, they may welcome you with open arms.

 

When you get to these websites, look for a message board where you can participate and showcase your credentials. The producers do scout their own boards for show ideas and potential guests. A lot of the shows will also list needs for upcoming shows. You may be a guest that can fit their needs perfectly, perhaps to provide an expert opinion or to otherwise weigh in on the topic of the day. It can be somewhat challenging to land a spot on a national TV show, but you never know until you try. Hey, maybe you could get your big break on daytime TV!

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Finding a Daytime Talk Show

How to Give a Great Interview

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It's Never Too Late to Keep a Promise or Write That Book

 

Be careful of those promises you make. Gone unfulfilled, they could haunt you for years - decades even. Take one Barnaby Conrad. He promised his old boss, mentor and friend, Sinclair Lewis, that he would indeed finish his tome on John Wilkes Booth. Shortly after making the promise, Lewis died and Conrad let the years slip away without finishing the book. Fast forward 60 years, and Conrad fulfilled his promise.  What prompted him to finish?

 

What moved him was his son Barnaby Conrad III, a writer and magazine editor who in 2009 had joined Council Oak Books and was hunting for new acquisitions; a year later, 59 years after Lewis died, he signed his father for an advance of $5,000. "I basically lit a fire under him again," the younger Mr. Conrad said.

 

You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: After 60 Years, a Promise Kept to Sinclair Lewis

 

Looking Into a Mirror with Another Mirror

 

There are those who have a problem with product placements in films and there are those who embrace it. Morgan Spurlock has created a documentary examining the practice of product placement and branding, and he funded the film with product placements in his film. In a practice of pure irony, Spurlock found companies that paid him to let him scrutinize how they package their brands.

 

So when business people decide to let documentary makers inside their well-fortified doors, exactly what do they hope to get out of it? Do they think they can charm them? Outwit them? Or maybe these buttoned-up corporate types just crave a star turn? Pat Aufderheide, director of the Center for Social Media, says she thinks that some companies that choose to participate do so because of a keep-your-enemies-closer strategy. "If they're not there, it looks like an admission of guilt," she said. "And at least if they show up they have a chance to get their side of the story - their spin - across."

 

You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: Product Placement, Turned Inside Out

 

Writing Music Old-school Style

 

There are no shortcuts worth taking in a creative business. While some seek fame and fortune by chasing down record executives and singing in contests, Anthony D'Amato chased down a professor at Princeton and handed him a demo CD. Why? Because this particular professor was Paul Muldoon, a renowned poet. D'Amato wanted to fine-tune his songwriting skills by learning from a master wordsmith.

 

"I wanted to get better, and I knew he was somebody who could help me get better," Mr. D'Amato, 23, said, sitting with Professor Muldoon recently in his office. Professor Muldoon, 55, won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 2003, and he is chairman of the Peter B. Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton. Starting in 2009, Mr. D'Amato, then a Princeton junior, met with Professor Muldoon every few weeks to pore over drafts of Mr. D'Amato's songs, which he started writing as a high school student at Blair Academy in Blairstown.

 

You can read the entire article on the New York Times' website: Aspiring Singer Finds Mentors Behind Ivy League Walls

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - January 28, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - January 21, 2011

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