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382 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to End a Novel with a Punch -Writer's Digest

 

Hook them in the beginning. Knock 'em out with your ending.

 

Beta Readers Help Edit Self-Published Book - GalleyCat

 

Using advanced readers to help you edit your book for free.

 

Film

 

Horror Effects That Won't Scare Your Budget -filmmaking.net

 

Here's a resource every indie horror filmmaker could use.

 

The Rocky Path from Pen to Screen - The Vancouver Sun

 

Screenwriter Pablo F. Fenjves discusses his big break in the film industry at the age of 58.

 

Music

 

Should Your Band Charge for Gigs? -The Musician's Guide

 

Some bands and singers are performing for free to showcase their talents. Is it a good career move?

 

Creative Music Marketing: Foo Fighters, Bluebrain, Adam Tensta - Hypebot.com

 

New technologies are creating very unique marketing strategies, but are they effective?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - March 16, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - March 09, 2012

2,038 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, marketing, marketing, music, music, film, film, self-publishing, self-publishing, indie, indie
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I recently stumbled across an eight-minute video in which a young book reviewer named Liz ranted, for lack of a better word, about self-published authors. Liz has nothing against indie books; it's the way some authors approach her that drives her nuts.

 

Full disclosure: Liz is not a professional book reviewer. She's a college student who loves to read and enjoys sharing her opinions online, and as a result, she's garnered quite a following. Her witty video reviews average about 800 views, and she has more than 1100 Twitter followers.

 

I thought the points she made in her video were excellent, and I also thought she was hilarious, so I dropped her a note asking if she'd be up for chatting with me. She kindly agreed.

 

In her words, here are her top pet peeves about getting pitched by indie authors:

 

  1. They really don't tell you who they are. No sort of introduction other than, "I'm the author of this book." That seems quite shady to me.
  2. They use the same message to email you, send to you on Goodreads, and more. It's annoying and I really don't want to read your book.
  3. The lack of attention to detail. I mean, thanks for emailing me and telling me how your book is like (Insert NYT Best Selling Author's Name Here), but I don't read that author's novels! You would know if you actually looked at my blog or YouTube channel.
  4. The lack of editing. They'll cite some sort of editor, but there are hundreds of typos and/or grammar mistakes. You may not have been an English major in college, but there are many books on writing, grammar, and more at your local bookstore. Also, reviewers aren't editors. We only review finished works.
  5. Get the hint! If I don't respond to your emails or other messages, I don't want to read your book. So stop it!

 

There are a lot of influential book lovers like Liz in cyberspace, and you want them rooting for you, not deleting your emails. As you implement your own book marketing campaign, you'll be less likely to land on the wrong side of their good graces if you take the above grievances to heart.

 

For those of you who are curious, you can view Liz's video here.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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What Is a Book Proposal?

Online Book Reviews for Independent Authors

5,191 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, reviews, reviews, reviews, reviews, author, author, author, author, self-publishing, self-publishing, self-publishing, self-publishing, pitch, pitch, pitch, pitch
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So far, we've discussed pooling our resources with other indie authors and organizing a mini-tour of sorts. We've looked at venues outside of the bookstore environment for a more effective appearance experience. Now, let's examine ways to promote your mini-tour.

 

For personal appearances, local radio programming should be your main target. While satellite radio has taken a fairly big chunk of the national terrestrial radio audience, local radio programs still enjoy a healthy listening audience of people who might attend your regional event. The trick is to find the radio programs that reach the same demographics as your book's audience. This means the hardest part for you in finding the right radio program to approach is to have a fairly definitive idea of the makeup of your readers. That will be the primary concern of the program's producer: Why are the books in your tour right for their audience?

 

You can start your search for radio stations by going to Radio-Locator and searching by city or zip code. Once you pull up a list of stations in the area, visit their websites and determine if their programming works for you. When you find a match, find the producers of the morning show or afternoon drive time show, and you're in business.

 

Start your conversation by sending them an email with information about your mini-tour. Sell the event with descriptions of all the books and bio information on the authors. Let the producers know you want to make this work in a way that benefits you, their station, and their listeners. Make sure you're clear on who the producer should contact to set up an interview with one or all of the authors, and give him/her a week to respond. If you don't receive a reply by then, politely follow up with another email offering to send some books for a giveaway on their program. If another week passes and you still haven't heard back, make a phone call. Professional persistence is the key to success in public relations. And by professional persistence, I mean making a concerted effort without seeming desperate or overbearing. If you haven't made any headway with a producer after three attempts, it's time to focus your marketing efforts elsewhere.

 

That should get you started with radio. Next week, we'll look at targeting local television shows.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Small Marketing Steps: Venues for Personal Appearances

Small Marketing Steps: The Group Tour

1,899 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, marketing, marketing, marketing, author, author, author, promotion, promotion, promotion, indie, indie, indie, radio, radio, radio, book_tour, book_tour, book_tour
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

The Unlikely Best-Seller: 'A Wrinkle In Time' Turns 50 -NPR

 

The experts don't always know best. This story proves excellent writing lets you break the "rules" sometimes.

 

The Average Book Has 64,500 Words -PWxyz

 

Ever wonder if your word count measures up to the classics? Wonder no more.

 

Film

 

Write What You (Don't) Know -a MOON Brothers film

 

Here's a counterpoint to the old axiom in every writer's head. To put it simply, if you can imagine it, you can write it.


The Power of "Don't Wait": Funding Lessons from Independent Filmmakers - Online News Association

 

Lam Thuy V investigates how so many filmmakers seem to be able to produce long-form documentary films.

 

Music

 

Songwriting 101: Thomas Hutchings -Riffraf

 

Saxophonist/producer Thomas Hutchings discusses his creative process.

 

Using Content Marketing to Energize Your Music Fan Funnel - Frying in Vein

 

Are you power pathing? Read this post by Hubert Sawyers III to find out what power pathing is all about.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - March 9, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - March 2, 2012

1,459 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, marketing, marketing, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, film, film, songwriting, songwriting
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Last week, we discussed putting together a group tour with other indie authors. This week, let's examine venues other than bookstores for your personal appearances. Bookstores are great, but they aren't always the best place to make an appearance. Customers have learned to artfully avoid unknown authors sitting at a table by themselves in bookstores. The author may indeed be extremely talented, but readers may prefer to dash off in search of the familiar rather than risk an uncomfortable moment if they aren't interested in the author's material.

 

It's far more effective for indie authors to pick venues where books are not the main product in the store. The group of indie authors I wrote about last week chose a large department store. They called the store's corporate office and arranged to do signings in the parking lots of several regional locations. I know of another small band of indie authors that holds signings at various flea markets.

 

Since we live in the age of social networking, I would advise finding venues that cater to tech-savvy patrons. The likelihood of your signing event hitting the Twitter-sphere and Facebook universe increases exponentially with the number of virtually connected people you have in attendance. In addition, look for upcoming conventions or industry-specific shows coming to your area. A home and garden expo would be a great place for authors with related books. A small business expo could be the perfect venue for a book on successful business practices and even motivational books on how to succeed.

 

The premise here is to find a place where you are unique, yet appropriate. Don't limit yourself to stores that just sell books. Think beyond the bookstore, and find a spot where you stand out and attract attention.

 

Next week, we'll start discussing the promotional aspects of your book tour and look into local radio stations.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How To Throw A Book Launch Party For Free

How to Give a Great Interview

2,873 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, marketing, marketing, author, author, author, promotion, promotion, promotion, branding, branding, branding, book_tour, book_tour, book_tour
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Small steps - that's the idea behind this new five-post series. Many authors get sidetracked by the complexity of creating a successful marketing campaign. It can be daunting and intimidating if you try to tackle too much at once. But you have time to do this right. Take a deep breath and tackle one task at a time.

 

Where should you start? My suggestion is to find others who are in your position. I'm talking about other authors. There really is strength in numbers. I recall a story from a few years ago of a dozen or so independent authors in the same region of the country who organized their own tour. They pooled their resources, rented a bus, and arranged for appearances over a four-day weekend. By getting a group of authors together, they turned an appearance into an event. Local news outlets are more likely to cover an event than a single book signing.

 

Think about it: they had a dozen people involved in the organization and promotion of a group book signing. An appearance that involves just one independent author can turn into a flop because there's just not enough man power behind it. Most indie authors are lucky to have a couple of friends and family members helping them get the word out. A group of authors with the same level of motivation to have a successful signing gives you greater odds of pulling off an event that will garner a lot of attention and exposure for your brand.

 

This may sound like a "big" small step, but it doesn't have to be. Your goal is simply to find other authors in your area and get the ball rolling. Once you've found a number of interested authors, you can start the process of organizing the event and divvy out tasks to those in your group. The important thing is that you won't be doing this alone. You'll have other motivated authors helping you make sure this a successful event.

 

Next week, we'll discuss possible venues for your event.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Marketing Based on Content

It's Never Too Early to Get a Little Help from Your Friends

1,874 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, books, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, author, author, author, author, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, tour, tour, tour, tour, branding, branding, branding, branding, book_tour, book_tour, book_tour, book_tour
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A couple months ago, I received an email from a woman who had heard me speak at an event out on the West Coast. She had recently self-published a short story as an e-book, and she said that even though she knew I was extremely busy, she was hoping I would give it a read.


 

The short story was available on Amazon for just $.99, so I bought it for my Kindle. Then, I replied to her email and told her I'd purchased it and was looking forward to reading it.

 

I never heard from her again.


 

At first I thought she was just busy, but it has been more than two months now. I am clearly never going to hear from her, and she clearly has no idea how to be a good marketer.


 

If you email people you barely know and ask them to buy your book, and they do, it is important to THANK THEM. I'm sure this woman probably sent a message to everyone in her address book, and I have no idea how many of them actually replied like I did, but it couldn't have been so many that it crashed her email.


 

As you begin your book marketing campaign, you're going to have to do a lot of outreach to get the word out. But if all you do is ask people to buy your book and then move on, you're not going to engender a lot of goodwill. Not everyone is going to respond to your request, so it's important to acknowledge those who do. Remember, a little bit of courtesy goes a long way!


 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

 

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Giving Books Away: A Strategy that Still Works

How to Manage Your Volunteer Sales Force

1,948 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, blog, blog, blogs, blogs
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The internet has contributed a number of opportunities and advancements to the information age. We get news we need (and news we don't need) almost instantaneously. It's changed the way the world does business. The internet is a source of knowledge available to us 24/7, and people are plugging into this "virtual brain" to learn whatever they can about what interests them.


Among those searching for information are beginning writers. They are eager, fledgling artists looking for all the information they can on writing, publishing, even public speaking. Anything they associate with the craft and business of writing, they want to know.


New writers are searching for knowledge, and you should aspire to be a chief source of information for them. By virtue of having a book available for sale, you already know more than many of them. You have writing experience, publishing experience, and experience marketing your book. You've been through the fire, so to speak. We learn from those that have been there before us, and we remember those who teach us.


There are two reasons I believe you should share your war stories. One, it will make for a pool of better-educated writers contributing to our society, something from which we all benefit. Two, by sharing your knowledge, you become a mentor of sorts to writers potentially all over the globe. Those who get the direct benefit of your authoritative advice are more likely to become part of your word-of-mouth campaign.


So I urge you to share your writing experiences on your blog, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or any other social networking tool you utilize. You can even try to contribute articles on the topic to media outlets. It's a way for you to give back to your art form, and in the long run, you will get benefits in the form of fans and relationships that will help you sell books.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


Finding Readers in Waiting Rooms

How to Manage Your Volunteer Sales Force

1,897 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, marketing, book, blog, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, blogs
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I drove my wife to a doctor's appointment not long ago, and I had a choice: I could sit in the waiting room and thumb through some magazines, or drive five miles to the nearest bookstore. Of course, I chose the bookstore.

 

It occurred to me while I was searching for my next Cormac McCarthy book that waiting rooms in doctor's offices are prime marketing real estate for authors. Not for selling books, but for finding potential readers for their word-of-mouth armies. Why not approach the office manager at a doctor's office about supplying them with books for their waiting room?

 

Now, there are a few things to keep in mind if you decide to pursue this strategy. First, you are looking for exposure, not direct sales. The sales will be a residual effect of getting your books into the hands of readers. This means there will be a cost without an immediate return on investment. You will be donating the books to the doctor's office with the understanding that their patients could take a copy with them when they leave with no expectation that they have to return it. In fact, you should write a note on the title page inviting them to take it, courtesy of the author. Be sure to also include your website, Facebook information, and Twitter handle. In short, this is an opportunity to connect with a new reader.

 

You should also remember that not every book is appropriate for all doctors' offices. Do some research before approaching the office manager. How? Simply by looking at the current magazines they provide patients in their waiting rooms. If you see a lot of news and special interest magazines, my guess is that mysteries, thrillers, children's books, and select YA titles would be a good fit. If you see a lot of religious or spiritual themed material, novels that are similarly themed would be a good fit. Some nonfiction books would be appropriate, but titles about medical treatment or diet may be rejected because the doctor doesn't want to appear to be endorsing something he or she hasn't had time to research.

 

How many books you provide the doctor's office and how many offices you approach is up to you. I would start small and expand as needed. Pick one office, leave 3-5 books, and check back in two weeks or a month. Resupply if needed or desired or move on to a new location.

 

The most important part of this particular strategy is to remember that the office manager for a doctor's office is pressed for time. Be sure to approach them with a concise pitch for both your book and your plan to provide them with free books. If you're lucky, they may ask for one for themselves. Good luck!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Shoot For the Stars: How to Get Testimonials for Your Book

Giving Books Away: A Strategy that Still Works

2,783 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, promotion
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For many authors, both traditional and self-published, marketing a book is harder than writing one. If you don't have a background in marketing, you may feel confused, overwhelmed, and even a little freaked out by the idea of it. Plus you may equate marketing with advertising and immediately think, Marketing is expensive, there's no way I can do it! But the truth is you can. You just need to be clever about how you go about it.


Here are three things you can do today - for free - to generate some buzz for your book:


1.  Put the entire first chapter of your book on your website and include a link to it in your email signature. If you don't have a website yet, build one tonight! GoDaddy.com has free templates with very inexpensive hosting packages. (Appropriately, it's called Website Tonight.)

 

2.  Add your book to your own "reading list" on LinkedIn so it will show up anytime someone views your profile. (You can do this under the "more" tab along the top.) If you're not on LinkedIn, setting up an account is free and super easy.

 

3.  Sign up for a free Square account so you can take credit card payments with your phone. Then start bringing a book with you everywhere you go. You never know who your next customer-and future fan-might be! I've sold books in some pretty random places, including on a plane, because I was able to accept payment via credit card.


Grassroots marketing is about being creative, not about spending a lot of money. If you're willing to put in the effort, you can do it!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Marketing Based on Content

Guerrilla Book Marketing Tactic

3,781 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, books, books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, selling, selling, selling, selling, selling, selling, selling, book, book, book, book, book, book, book, author, author, author, author, author, author, author, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, writers, writers, writers, writers, writers, writers, writers, writing, writing, writing, writing, writing, writing, writing, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions
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Sometimes I get a little uncomfortable when I receive an email from an author friend or see a Facebook status from an author I follow begging me to spread the word about their book. Desperation is not a great sales technique. Word of mouth is the best free advertisement a first time author can get and people are much more likely to spread the word for you when you approach them from a position of confidence.


I am a fan of enlisting your friends to join your "volunteer sales force," but they're only going to do that if they're excited about your book, and they're only going to get excited if you feed them a steady stream of positive news about your book. The bottom line is that people pull for the underdog with the right attitude. They want to contribute to that person's overall success.


True, not every day is going to bring earth shattering news in relation to your book, but chances are you receive little "victories" centered around your book on a regular basis, so be sure you're not letting them slide by unannounced. Maybe you unexpectedly sold a couple of books on a particular day. A small note via email or Facebook stating that you're excited about book sales and you just wanted to thank everyone for spreading the word is not only acceptable, it's thoughtful. Maybe you get a good review. Again, share it with your volunteer sales force and thank them for their help.


People want to feel invested in your success. Give them that opportunity by making them feel like they are a part of your success, and remember to thank them every step of the way.

 

-      -Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Take Control with Marketing Central

The Power of a Personal Connection

2,559 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, book, book, book, author, author, author, writer, writer, writer, writers, writers, writers
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What Is A QR Code?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 10, 2012

I'm sure you are much smarter than I am, and you haven't been baffled by the rise of something known as a QR code. It appears to be an object out of a science fiction movie that can transport you to new worlds and destinations. If by chance you feel underinformed about this marketing device, allow me to shed for you what little light I have on the topic.

 

QR codes are barcodes with superhero powers. They appear in real and/or virtual space as a square arrangement of little boxes and squiggly lines. Click here for an example of a typical QR code (and for some information on a unique way in which authors are using QR codes) - QR Codes - the Gateway to Augmented Reality Books. When scanned by a special device, barcodes will give you the basic information about an item. When QR codes are scanned by mobile devices with the proper application, you will be sent to a website or a video, or to a downloadable file that is related to the item.

 

For instance, an author may use a QR code as a profile picture on Facebook. When the QR code is scanned, the trailer for his or her latest book pops up on the user's mobile device. Or in another case, you may be walking down the street and see a flyer with a QR code for an author hanging on a light pole. Scan the QR code, and a website with information on the author's upcoming appearances in the area will pop up on your mobile device.

 

Here is a free website where you can experiment with QR codes: Qurify. Most new mobile phones are equipped with QR code readers as a standard application, but just in case, here's a website where you can learn more information on QR code software for your mobile phones: QRStuff.com.

 

Are QR codes for you? It's hard for me to advise you on something like that. I will say that if you have a highly organized marketing strategy, it might be the perfect complement to your plan. If nothing else, they give the appearance of someone in tune with today's high tech world.


- Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Ramping Up Facebook Activity for the New Year

Take Control with Marketing Central

2,854 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, selling, book, author, promotion, writers, writing, branding
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People can be flakey. It's unfortunate, but true. Professionally and personally, not everyone has the ability to stay on top of everything. That's why, when it comes to marketing your book, following up often and multiple times is crucial.

 

As you promote your book, you're going to reach out to a lot of people, and while many of them may have the best of intentions, life will often get in the way. You might have a great conversation with someone about arranging a review or an event, but at some point he or she might forget to e-mail or call you back - even if it's technically his or her turn. In ninety-nine percent of those cases, if you don't get the ball rolling again, that will be the end of it. Believe me.

 

In a previous post I discussed the importance of keeping a marketing spreadsheet to track your efforts. If you can be diligent enough to make a note each time you send someone an e-mail or leave a voicemail, it will pay off in the long run by reminding you to get back in touch with those you haven't heard from. It's easy to send an e-mail or leave a message and expect a reply, but unfortunately that's not always the way it works. Another good trick is to keep a "waiting to hear from" list with dates indicating the last time you reached out to different individuals.

 

Someone else's job and family are always going to come before your book, and that's completely understandable. The sooner you accept that, the sooner you'll stop feeling neglected and start being more proactive.

 

- Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Shoot For the Stars: How to Get Testimonials for Your Book

Branding 101: The Keys to Successful Branding

2,223 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, book, author, promotion
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Welcome to a new year. You have twelve months in front of you to gradually step up your branding activity. Let this be the year that you commit to building your brand. To make it easy on yourself, start by increasing your presence on Facebook. In my opinion, Facebook is better suited for people who aren't necessarily comfortable with the concept of social networking. Why? It allows you to expand your interactions beyond bite-sized communications. There are character restrictions on wall postings, but you're allotted more than enough space to convey your thoughts. In other words, you won't have to shorthand your brand.

 

How do you use Facebook to build your brand? Here are three actions you can take every day to do just that:

 

1. Update your status - Too many authors join Facebook and either let the account sit dormant or only comment on someone else's status. Try initiating the conversation. There are a few ways to do so and none of them are too taxing. I will often post a link to an interesting article on my wall or a link to my own blog. I frequently post status updates that have to do with writing or my books. I've seen authors ask for reviews or post reminders that their book would make a great gift. I'm not sure that's the best strategy, but posting about your latest review or your favorite e-mail from a fan is something you would share with a friend, so it's appropriate for Facebook.

 

2. Engage - Initiating the conversation doesn't mean you should ignore other members' status updates or comments on your status updates. Engage your friends. The true power of social networking is the give and take between author and reader. When you engage a reader on Facebook, you're likely raising that reader's level of commitment to spreading the word about your book.

 

3. Friend invitations - You're on Facebook, but does anyone know? Do you have a link on your blog? Is it in your e-mail signature? Do you tell people you meet at parties or other social gatherings to "friend" you on Facebook? You should be building your friend base at every opportunity. The more friends you have, the bigger your word of mouth campaign becomes.

 

There you have it - three easy steps that you can take every day to build your brand via Facebook. Once you develop the habit of incorporating these steps into your everyday routine, I think you'll find that it doesn't take that much time out of your day, and it's actually fun.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 


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Branding 101: Tools for Branding

Email Signatures: What's In a Name?

2,773 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, facebook, promotions, branding
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice, and opinions from around the virtual globe.


Books/Publishing


The Persistence of the Author Brand - Writer's Digest

Is publishing frequently a good marketing strategy?


So Where Do You Get Your Ideas? - Huffington Post

Warren Adler examines the one question every author gets.


Film


Plot Holes and the Icebox Syndrome - a MOON Brothers film

Hitchcock deliberately left subtle plot holes in his films to inspire speculation, resulting in people seeing the film again to look for clues they may have missed the first time.   


The Adventures of Spielberg: An Interview - The New York Times

An interesting interview with one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of film. 


Music


How to Build an Effective Google+ Brand Strategy - Mashable

Britney Spears is the first to reach 1 million followers on Google+. What can you do to catch up? 


Speaking with Vocal Fry: Danger!! - Judy's Blog

Are you fatiguing your voice when you engage in conversations with a gravely/hoarse voice?


-Richard


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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Roundup - December 23, 2011

Weekly News Roundup - December 16, 2011

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