Skip navigation
1 ... 12 13 14 15 16 ... 25 Previous Next

Resources

369 Posts tagged with the marketing tag
0

Welcome to a new year. You have twelve months in front of you to gradually step up your branding activity. Let this be the year that you commit to building your brand. To make it easy on yourself, start by increasing your presence on Facebook. In my opinion, Facebook is better suited for people who aren't necessarily comfortable with the concept of social networking. Why? It allows you to expand your interactions beyond bite-sized communications. There are character restrictions on wall postings, but you're allotted more than enough space to convey your thoughts. In other words, you won't have to shorthand your brand.

 

How do you use Facebook to build your brand? Here are three actions you can take every day to do just that:

 

1. Update your status - Too many authors join Facebook and either let the account sit dormant or only comment on someone else's status. Try initiating the conversation. There are a few ways to do so and none of them are too taxing. I will often post a link to an interesting article on my wall or a link to my own blog. I frequently post status updates that have to do with writing or my books. I've seen authors ask for reviews or post reminders that their book would make a great gift. I'm not sure that's the best strategy, but posting about your latest review or your favorite e-mail from a fan is something you would share with a friend, so it's appropriate for Facebook.

 

2. Engage - Initiating the conversation doesn't mean you should ignore other members' status updates or comments on your status updates. Engage your friends. The true power of social networking is the give and take between author and reader. When you engage a reader on Facebook, you're likely raising that reader's level of commitment to spreading the word about your book.

 

3. Friend invitations - You're on Facebook, but does anyone know? Do you have a link on your blog? Is it in your e-mail signature? Do you tell people you meet at parties or other social gatherings to "friend" you on Facebook? You should be building your friend base at every opportunity. The more friends you have, the bigger your word of mouth campaign becomes.

 

There you have it - three easy steps that you can take every day to build your brand via Facebook. Once you develop the habit of incorporating these steps into your everyday routine, I think you'll find that it doesn't take that much time out of your day, and it's actually fun.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 


You may also be interested in...

Branding 101: Tools for Branding

Email Signatures: What's In a Name?

2,765 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, promotion, facebook, promotions, branding
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice, and opinions from around the virtual globe.


Books/Publishing


The Persistence of the Author Brand - Writer's Digest

Is publishing frequently a good marketing strategy?


So Where Do You Get Your Ideas? - Huffington Post

Warren Adler examines the one question every author gets.


Film


Plot Holes and the Icebox Syndrome - a MOON Brothers film

Hitchcock deliberately left subtle plot holes in his films to inspire speculation, resulting in people seeing the film again to look for clues they may have missed the first time.   


The Adventures of Spielberg: An Interview - The New York Times

An interesting interview with one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of film. 


Music


How to Build an Effective Google+ Brand Strategy - Mashable

Britney Spears is the first to reach 1 million followers on Google+. What can you do to catch up? 


Speaking with Vocal Fry: Danger!! - Judy's Blog

Are you fatiguing your voice when you engage in conversations with a gravely/hoarse voice?


-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Weekly News Roundup - December 23, 2011

Weekly News Roundup - December 16, 2011

1,503 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, music, music, film, film, author, author, newsletter, newsletter
0

In the past, I've suggested that authors give books away to build buzz. It's a strategy that is sometimes met with resistance because some authors see it as coming with double costs. First, there's the cost of the actual books; we may get books at a deeply discounted rate, but it's still money out of our pockets. The second is that we feel like we're losing a sale since we're giving a book away for free. I won't argue that both of these costs do exist or at least potentially exist when you give a book away. But I am still a proponent of this tactic.


It may sound counterintuitive, but giving a book away can lead to more sales, and more importantly, it can add another "mouth" to your word-of-mouth campaign. Giving a signed book to a reader is a big deal because it demonstrates a strong commitment to your fan base that can result in creating the kind of brand loyalty you're after. Here are three examples of how giving away my young adult books for free has led to building my fanbase:


  1. Years ago, a teacher sent me an email telling me a student read one of my books and talked about it so much in class that the other kids wanted to know where to get a copy. I asked for her school's address, signed twenty-five copies, and shipped them to her the next day. She's included my books on her list of recommended reads for the semester ever since.
  2. I gave a presentation at a middle school not long ago, and after the presentation I gave away fifty books to the people in attendance (parents, teachers, and students). I acquired more than a dozen new Facebook friend requests over the next few days from people who attended that presentation. Periodically, I get messages from some of them asking me when I'll be releasing my next book.
  3. I gave a single book away to a woman at a party when I found out she was a teacher. Three months later, she contacted me to be a featured speaker at her school. I brought books to give out to the kids, and I made a return trip the next year.

1

-Richard


https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Grab Readers' Attention with Your Hook

Evaluating Your Author Brand

2,051 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, author, author
0

Whether you're independently or traditionally published, your best chance to succeed in today's publishing world is for you as the author to take control of your marketing efforts. Gone are the days when authors were flown from coast to coast on someone else's dime, making TV appearances and doing dozens of highly attended in-store book signings. Instead, we live in a world that has turned virtual and more brand-centric than ever before when it comes to selling books. You have to take control of your brand with an almost fierce sense of independence to give yourself the opportunity to have a long and fulfilling career as an author.


In the spirit of taking that control, I regularly scan the Internet in search of marketing information for authors. I'm constantly on the hunt for the latest developments on the topic. Therefore, I was pleased when CreateSpace introduced Marketing Central, which includes original articles and links to articles on the web about the many phases and incarnations of book promotions. As they say themselves:


At your fingertips, you'll find a variety of free marketing information and resources to help you get started and take control of your path to successfully promoting your book.


Marketing Central features articles from some of your favorite CreateSpace expert contributors, including Joel Friedlander, Brian Jud, and Maria Murnane. In addition, it's also a place to peruse links to various other marketing-related features like success stories, blog posts, and genre-specific strategies. Think of it as a destination for marketing information to get you started with strategy and planning. I expect that even more resources will be added in the future as the industry evolves and new methodologies for branding authors emerge.


Resources like these will help get you on the right path to marketing your book. It's time to take control and start building your brand!


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Marketing Based on Content

Shoot For the Stars: How to Get Testimonials for Your Book

1,984 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotions, promotions, promotions, branding, branding, branding, marketing_central, marketing_central, marketing_central
0

Public speaking is a wonderful way to get the word out about your book. However, you'd be surprised at how much advanced planning is involved in setting up even the smallest of events. Coordinating with a local book club or business group could take months, and major conferences select their speakers up to a year in advance!


If you want to secure speaking engagements, you need to start way ahead of time. Before you start your outreach, you should create brief yet compelling descriptions about yourself, your book, and the topic(s) on which you can speak. Include a professional headshot and cover art of your book. If you have any testimonials from individuals or organizations that have heard you speak, include those as well. Save this document as your "speaking bio" and update it regularly with anything impressive about you or your book, e.g. awards, press mentions, or other organizations to which you have spoken.


Next up is outreach. In last week's post, I stressed the importance of tracking your marketing efforts, so if you took my advice and have already created a marketing spreadsheet, that's one less thing on your to-do list. As you begin your research and outreach, keep track of each organization you contact (or plan to contact) with enough detail to refresh your memory the next time you visit the document. The purpose of the tracking document is to keep you from reinventing the wheel, so be sure to note relevant information, which can vary for each organization.


As you go, you'll probably receive multiple replies along the lines of "We'd love to have you speak at [name of conference/event/club/etc. here], but we're all booked," so you'll quickly learn the importance of starting early. But that's okay! There's always next time, and you've already done the research for that particular organization. Plus, each time you reach out, you're not only networking, but also making contact with a potential reader - and that never hurts.


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


You may also be interested in:


Keep Track of Your Successes

Keep Your Chin Up!

1,817 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, marketing, book, writing, tracking, public_speaking
0

Your book is published, and you've got an online presence. You've set up an appearance in a library or bookstore in your area. You've even gotten some press coverage in your local newspaper. Now what? You may feel like you've done everything you can do, and now you're looking to expand your marketing efforts beyond your hometown. What's your next move?

 

Look to the contents of your book. Is there a marketing opportunity that you're overlooking? I wrote a book that included a small town located about nine hours from my current residence. I realized early on that the simple act of including the name of the town and some landmarks from the town gave me another marketing avenue. I sent a press release to the paper there, and they ran a huge story in the paper about the book. A local bookstore then sent me an email to set up a book signing, and a book club located in the town even invited me to a dinner to discuss the book. A radio talk show host also invited me on his show because I'd mentioned his town, which was nearby

 

It's important to remember to look beyond genre and your physical location when you're marketing your book on a tight budget. It's likely that there are elements in your book that you can use to boost your marketing efforts. Whether you've given your protagonist a hobby like stamp collecting or you've included a dog that understands American Sign Language, there is bound to be a hook in your story that will give you a fairly well-defined group to market to. It doesn't even have to be a major part of your book.

 

When you don't have the budget to use a shotgun approach to marketing, carefully pick targets based on the content of your book. You might be surprised how many targets are hiding between the covers.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in:

 

You Know More Than You Think You Do!

Get Readers Talking with a Serial Novel

1,971 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, content, content, content, content
0

The other day, I had coffee with Jennifer Wilkov, an award-winning writer and host of the popular "Your Book Is Your Hook" radio show. She also runs a successful business helping authors navigate the writing and publishing process. I told her about the blog I've been writing for CreateSpace and asked her what advice she'd give to self-published authors. She said hands down the two most common mistakes she sees indie authors make are:


1) Lack of professional editing

2) Lack of a marketing plan


Professional Editing

If your book is full of errors or isn't well constructed, readers won't recommend it to others - period. No matter who we are, we all need an editor! You'd be surprised at how affordable some services are, both on the copy editing and creative editing side. In a previous post, I discussed the difference between these two functions, but here's a quick recap:


Copy editors have eagle eyes for typos, missing words, punctuation, grammar, repetition, consistency, etc.


Creative editors help identify and fix problems with the major elements of your book, such as plot, character development, pacing, and style.


Marketing

If you don't have a plan for reaching people who aren't your friends and family, the harsh reality is that you probably won't sell very many books. Having a "marketing plan" doesn't necessarily mean spending lots of money on advertising. There are tons of things you can do on your own that cost little more than your time. The key is to write a good book first, then be creative and persistent in getting the word out. Remember, it won't happen overnight!


-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...


Marketing Central

Everyone Needs an Editor!

4,203 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, marketing, marketing, editing, editing, editing, advertising, advertising, advertising, indie, indie, indie, indie_publishing, indie_publishing, indie_publishing
0

Crowdsourcing a Graphic Novel

What do you do if you want to self-publish a graphic novel and you're not an artist? It would seem that your only choices would be to learn to draw or hire an artist. But illustrating a book that is hundreds of pages takes a considerable investment of time and as a consequence, money. Author Alex de Campi faced just such a dilemma.

 

Getting creative in the case of de Campi, meant turning to Kickstarter, a crowd-sourcing website where entrepreneurs can raise money from the public for their projects. As was widely reported in book blogs, de Campi set up an account on Kickstarter to raise $27,000 to publish her book. Much of the money is to be spent paying James Broxton, the graphic artist for the book. Through Kickstarter, those who want to support de Campi's book can buy a limited-edition hardcover copy plus a serialized digital edition for $30, or a cameo for themselves as a minor character in the book for $1,200, for instance.

 

You can read the entire article on Digital Book World's website: Taking Extreme Measures to Find the Self-Publishing Holy Grail


Lights, Camera, Okay

How does the legendary actor/writer/director/producer Clint Eastwood direct his actors on the set? Just as you would imagine: as cool as a cucumber. It seems Mr. Eastwood isn't a fan of the word "action." Instead, he's known to say very quietly, "Okay." I, for one, picture a stoic look with a light arch of the eyebrow as he delivers the "Okay," in that whispered tough guy tone that he's known for. Some actors prefer it to a director who barks out "ACTION!"

 

"There would be takes that we did where I was under the impression we were shooting a rehearsal," admits 'J. Edgar' co-star Armie Hammer about Clint Eastwood's famously brisk directorial style, a statement that flies in the face - just a tad - of what was said at the 'J. Edgar' press conference in Los Angeles last week. "I've got this reputation of shooting one take, and it's a wonderful reputation to have, but it's hard to live up to," said Eastwood. "If you did, it'd be kind of shoddy, I think." Then again, Eastwood wasn't in the room when Moviefone spoke to Armie Hammer.


You can read the entire article on Moviefone.com: Armie Hammer on Clint Eastwood's Directing Style: 'I Thought We Were Just Rehearsing That'


Relationship Marketing

Engage. That is the buzz word in today's hyper-social media world that could take casual listeners of your music and turn them into fans that recommend your music to others. Friend them when you have the opportunity, and you will make them feel happy. Interact with them when you get the opportunity, and you will make them feel connected to your brand.

 

Each and every time you speak directly with a fan (in-person at a show, at your place of business, on the phone, via email, on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or in your blog's comments) you earn points with them and are creating a relationship. I know, I know...that's such an overused term in marketing. But it's true. It's this relationship that causes a fan to pay more attention to you, and when the time is right...that relationship can be monetized.

 

You can read the entire article on Hypebot.com: Online Conversations Offer Opportunity For Conversion

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - November 11, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - November 4, 2011

1,731 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, marketing, marketing, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, film, film, novel, novel, films, films, news, news, crowdsourcing, crowdsourcing
0

Years ago, I bought a new book by Stephen King that was around 100 pages. It was titled The Green Mile. It was not his usual brick-thick tome. It was a thin book that I read on a short airplane ride. Now, you're probably thinking that I must not be talking about the same The Green Mile by Stephen King that you know and love. But, I am...kind of.

 

King originally released The Green Mile as a serial novel. For those of you who don't know, a serial novel is simply a novel that is released in parts over a fairly short period of time. King broke The Green Mile into six parts, and each book was between 90 and 120 pages.


It was an ingenious marketing strategy on Stephen King's part. Each book came out in paperback at a cost of about $3.99. He released a new book every month. For six months, the book was a topic of conversation among King fans. The anticipation that developed while readers waited for the next installment created a buzz across the fruited plain.

 

Stephen King didn't just publish a book or, in this case, books, he created an experience. When it was all said and done, King had sold tens of thousands of short books at $3.99. The readers enjoyed the experience so much they didn't even mind when they added up their investment and realized they had actually paid almost $24.00 for a full length paperback book. To them, it was as if they were getting a sneak peak at a book as it was being written. That wasn't the case, of course. The fully edited version of the entire The Green Mile manuscript was done months before the first serialized edition came out. But even so, to the reader it felt like they were there from the beginning.

 

It occurred to me that in today's print on-demand and eBook world, the serial novel is a viable publishing strategy for self-published authors. Dividing a novel into several parts and publishing those parts separately over time could be a great way for you to build a buzz and following for your book. Now, it's doubtful you have the same fan base that Stephen King does, but a serial novel, if it's compelling and well written, can give your smaller fan base something to chat about on their blogs and social networks, and it's a sustained conversation. They will talk about the book with each new installment.

 

The serial novel strategy is a low-risk experiment you could incorporate into your current marketing and publishing plans. Consider giving your readers more than a book; give them an experience they can share with their online connections.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

To Serialize or Not to Serialize, That Is the Question

It's Never Too Early to Get a Little Help from Your Friends

2,469 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, books, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, book, book, book, novel, novel, novel, writers, writers, writers, publishing, publishing, publishing, serial, serial, serial
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.


Books/Publishing


Can I Market My Book Without Facebook and Twitter? - Self Publishing Coach


Some authors just don't want to get involved in social networking. There are a few alternatives.


Author Blogging 101: Up With Comments! - The Book Designer


Comments and commenting can add life to your blog.


Film


Steal This Editing Secret to Edit Film and Video Like a Pro -Joke and Biagio


Mastering editing may be as simple as using the tracing paper method.


Creative Minds Cannes Internships -Filmmaking.net


Here's a chance to bone up on your French and study under some of the best filmmaking talent in the world.


Music


Getting the Music Advertising ROI Calculation Correct - Music Think Tank


Are you getting everything you can out of your advertising budget? The folks at Music Think Tank can help you figure it out.


Why You Need to Meet Musicians Like You - The Musician's Guide


Networking isn't just a virtual experience. The key to booking your next gig may come from the fellow musicians you meet at shows and other venues.


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Tuesday's Blog Roundup - November 1, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - October 25, 2011 Edition

1,301 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, music, filmmaking, film, networking, blogging, musicians, social_media
0

Oh, those horrible traps that can sabotage your brand. They are everywhere, and if you're not on your toes, you can get caught in one and sink your hard branding work. Even the smartest authors have made wrong moves that ultimately chased readers away. Those moves didn't have anything to do with the quality of their writing taking a nose dive, but everything to do with letting emotions get the best of them, especially over reviews. Here are three types of flubs that could have serious consequences and tarnish your brand.


  1. Lashing out - It is never a good idea to respond negatively to a bad review. I can't emphasize this point enough. It's never fun getting shredded by a reader in a review. I know because I've experienced it. How did I handle it? I took a walk and let it pass. Not everyone is going to like my books. Unfortunately, I've seen too many authors try to defend themselves in response to a bad review, or worse, attack the reviewer. It's a bad move because it comes off as being unprofessional. If an author takes time to respond to these, it is likely future buyers will give that review more weight since it "touched a nerve" with the author. As my grandmother used to say, "Leave it be."
  2. Rallying the troops - There have been a few authors who went beyond lashing out and took their anger at bad reviews to a new level. They voiced their anger on social media sites and tried to rally their friends and followers to take up their cause. In essence, they created a mob to virtually attack the reviewer. If you want to chase sales away, make people feel they have to like your book or else an angry group of fans will stalk them on Facebook and/or Twitter.
  3. Phony reviews - New and established authors have been caught at this particular game. They create numerous accounts on an online retail site, and write glowing reviews of their own books. I know you would never do anything like this, but those authors who got caught lost fans by the truckload. It's tough waiting for a review to come in, but don't let your impatience get the best of you. Ride it out.


That does it for our series on branding. Remember, it takes time and consistency to build your brand into something that will benefit your marketing efforts. It doesn't cost a lot of money, but it does take a lot of commitment from you to keep adding elements to your author brand. Have fun, keep it professional, and build that author brand.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...


Branding 101: The Keys to Successful Branding

Branding 101: Tools for Branding


1,993 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, reviews, reviews, reviews, reviews, reviews, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, brand, brand, brand, brand, brand, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand
0

Do you include a signature at the end of your personal emails? If not, you should! Adding a signature is a fantastic way to promote your book. A few posts back, I talked about the importance of coming up with a compelling hook, and your email signature is great example of how to put that hook into action.

 

The signature doesn't have to be anything fancy. Here's the one I use:

 

Maria Murnane, award-winning author of Perfect on Paper, a must read for anyone who has ever run into an ex looking like crap

www.mariamurnane.com

Follow me!

 

Most email signatures can be added under the "settings" in your email service. If you don't have an author website (put that on your to-do list now!), you can hyperlink "click here for more information" to your book's sales listings, social media accounts, or Amazon.com author page. Hyperlinks are usually added by clicking on the icon that looks like a chain.

 

Many people in my personal life don't know I'm an author until they see an email from me about something completely unrelated. For example, I play a lot of soccer, so I'm always on group emails for tournaments, teams, pickup games, league parties, etc. I've lost track of how many times I've received an email from someone on a group email chain saying something along the lines of "Wow, I had no idea you are a published author. I just ordered a copy of your book!" One woman who recently saw my signature is the head soccer coach at a university, and she wants me to come speak to all the female athletes there about what it's like to be a professional writer. What a great opportunity that happened solely because of my email signature.

 

Now get e-signing!

 

-Maria

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/MurnaneHeadshot.jpg

Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She writes romantic comedies and provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Everyone Needs an Editor!

Keep Your Chin Up!

2,242 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, promotion, email, signature, e-mail, branding
0

Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Boost Your Online Book Sales with "Sales Nodes" - digital book world

 

Do you know what a sales node is? It's a good term and concept to know.

 

Book as Process, Book as Byproduct, Book as Conversation - Buzz Machine

 

Can a book ever go viral? Jeff Jarvis thinks it can if it's more than a book.

 

Film

 

Traditional Indie Film Marketing - Context Building- Consolidated Films

 

If your film doesn't have context, it's hard to build a marketing strategy for it. Learn how to develop your film's context.

 

Strange Filmmaking Methods of Famous Directors -Flavorwire

 

Which filmmaker handwrites all his screenplays and which director credits transcendental meditation for his creative success?

 

Music

 

5 Tips about Writing Your Own Band Bio - Music Coaching

 

Not knowing who you are as a band can seriously hamper your success.

 

Talking On The Phone Can Hurt Your Voice! - Judy Rodman

 

Talking on the phone creates bad habits that can ruin your voice. Why? Because you can't see the person with whom you are talking.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - October 25, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - October 18, 2011 Edition

1,445 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, selling, selling, filmmaking, filmmaking, sales, sales, bio, bio, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
0

So far, we've defined what an author brand is, examined some examples of author brands, and gone over the primary online tools for building an author brand. Today, we will examine the keys to a successful author brand. The good news is they aren't too difficult to master.

 

  • Blinders - There will be days when it feels like no one is listening to you. Whether you're doing personal videos, blogs posts, or podcasts, you may feel like you would be better off screaming down a deep, dark hole. That's normal. Building an author brand takes an unfailing belief that the brand will catch on. You will find an audience. Just put your blinders on and keep moving forward.
  • Persistence - Building a blog takes volume. By volume, I mean lots of material. You need an archive of blog posts, videos, and online interactions through social media sites, and that archive needs to be deep. You only get that kind of archive by consistently putting material online. Be persistent, and the archive will grow.
  • Honesty - The author brand is nothing more than you. If you try to be something you're not, your brand will most likely fail. If you commit to being yourself, your author brand will have consistency and authenticity. Your voice will come through over and over again, and your brand will catch on.
  • Passion - Strive to put the same kind of passion you put into creating your author brand as you do writing your books. After your writing, your author brand is the second most important element of your life as an author. Your author brand is your lifeline to building relationships with readers, so give them a reason to connect with you. They will make that connection if your passion shows through.

 

As I said, these keys aren't difficult to master. They do require you to spend some time and effort, but it's a small price to pay for an effective brand. Next week, we'll finish off this series by taking a look at how to avoid pitfalls that can damage your author brand.

 

-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

You may also be interested in...

 

Branding 101: Tools for Branding

Branding 101: Examples of Author Brands

2,958 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, marketing, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotion, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, promotions, brand, brand, brand, brand, brand, brand, brand, brand, brand, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, branding, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand, author_brand
0

Don't Call This Post "Nice"

It may be the most mysterious word in the English language. It's usually meant as a compliment, but often it is perceived as an insult. What is this magic word? "Nice." That one word can derail a date before it's even started. It has the power to sever the closest of relationships. It can even cause unrest in an otherwise solid marriage. So how did such a nice word get such a bad reputation?

 

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, "nice" has its origin in Latin, coming from nescius ("ignorant, not knowing"), a compound of the stem of scire ("to know") + the prefix ne- ("not"). The word evolved from there into the Old French nice, niche, nisce ("simple, foolish, ignorant"). By the late 13th century, it was a Middle English word: nice, nyce, nys (meaning essentially "foolish, stupid, senseless").

 

You can read the entire article on PWxyz: The Worst Word in the English Language is "Nice"

 

Marketing is Just a Phone Call Away

Jonah Hill is a fairly big star these days. He starred in a movie opposite Brad Pitt. He's got his own animated series coming to network television. He's appeared in numerous top-quality comedies. Surely he can rest on his laurels. Maybe not. Hill has taken an active role in the marketing of his new film "The Sitter." When I say active, I mean active.

 

Fox recently dispersed posters across the country printed with Mr. Hill's image, the message "Need a Sitter?" and phone numbers on tear-off tabs. About 250,000 people called and nearly half left voicemails. Here comes the unusual part: Mr. Hill agreed to carry around the phone belonging to that number and randomly answer calls himself. A Fox spokesman said he had answered a few dozen times. On Wednesday, he began turning the tables and returning messages.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: Will Phone Stunt for 'The Sitter' Yield Right Numbers at Box Office?


The Cristal Baschet

Musical instruments come in all shapes and sizes. They incorporate wood, steel, brass, ivory...virtually any material you can imagine. I'm familiar with your basic musical instruments, but I admit ignorance when it comes to the more exotic ones. For instance, I had never heard of a cristal baschet until reading about it in today's Los Angeles Times. Frankly, now I want to see one up close and personal.


The cristal baschet is one of the most beautiful musical instruments you will ever see, made of vibrating, tuned steel, fiberglass amplification cones and wire "whiskers" that shimmy when fingers rub the glass-rod keyboard. Film composer Cliff Martinez's version, which resides in the living room of his Topanga Canyon home, is about the size of an upright piano and is as much sculpture as instrument.

 

You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' website: Cliff Martinez scores a strange success with 'Drive'


-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


You may also be interested in...

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - October 21, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - October 14, 2011

1,506 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: marketing, marketing, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, writing, writing, hollywood, hollywood, words, words, nice, nice
1 ... 12 13 14 15 16 ... 25 Previous Next

Actions