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285 Posts tagged with the musicians tag
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Is Writing Work?

Author Richard Ford asks the question, "Does writing qualify as work?" After all, those who do write full-time don't usually keep regular hours. A lot of writing requires hours of thinking, which looks remarkably like doing nothing. And I suppose those ongoing battles with writer's block could look a lot like wasting time. So is writing work? From Ford's article in The Guardian:        

 

Work, after all - to me, anyway - signifies something hard. And while writing novels can be (I love this word) challenging (it can also be tedious in the extreme; take forever to finish; demoralise me into granite and make me want to quit and find another line of work), it's not ever what I'd call hard. A hard job, okay, would have to be strenuous and pressurised (writing's almost never that way). It would have to be obdurate, never offering me a chance to let up (I can quit writing any time I want to and come back tomorrow, or never).

 

You can read the entire article on The Guardian's website: This writing life

 

The Dizzying World of Digital File Formats

While the digital age has ushered in a much-needed revolution in the world of filmmaking, it has resulted in a confusing array of differing file formats that vary in quality. As a result, some think continuity has become a casualty of digital filmmaking. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science has stepped up to the plate and is doing their best to tame the digital frontier.

 

Files have had to be translated to and from dozens of file formats, with images not always translating properly, quality suffering, and time and money wasted fixing the problems. Enter the Acad's Image Interchange Framework (IIF), a new way of gathering, processing and preserving more picture information than has been possible in the past. The Acad's Science and Technology Council spent five years developing the file format, with an eye toward making it possible for anyone in production, post or preservation to have a standardized way of working with all the digital elements now involved in filmmaking.

 

You can read the entire article on Variety.com: Academy aims to tame digital frontier

 

Selling Your Soul

It's widely thought that Ralph Macchio's second greatest movie is Crossroads. The story is about a classically trained guitar prodigy whose only desire is to be a great blues guitarist. He travels to the Mississippi Delta and ends up selling his soul to be the greatest blues guitarist ever. Very few people know that the story is actually based on a myth about legendary blues guitarist Robert Johnson. There are those who say Johnson sold his soul to be able to play the blues as well as he did.

 

...the original intersection of Highways 61 and 49, the place where seminal blues musician Robert Johnson is said to have arrived one midnight to seal a deal with the devil, trading his soul to become the greatest blues musician in history. Perhaps. Actually, there are at least three such crossroads around northern Mississippi, any of which might be the one Johnson had in mind 75 years ago when he wrote his signature song "Cross Road Blues" - and that's only relevant to those who are remotely likely to believe in such things.

 

You can read the entire article on the Los Angeles Times' websiteHypebot.com: At the crossroads as Robert Johnson centennial nears

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - May 6, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 29, 2011

1,380 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, writers, writers, digital, digital, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Gary Vaynerchuk and Joe Sorge - The Daily Blog

Two social media mavens sit down and discuss innovative marketing in a Web 2.0 world.

 

How to Hire Good Editors - Editors Only

We all need them, but how do we know how to find the right one? Editors Only dishes out their advice on how to find the perfect editor for you.

 

Film

 

The Four Types of Filmmaker - Making the Movie

Are you a perfectionist, a master, a freewheeler? What type of filmmaker are you?

 

Why People Will Invest in Your Film - Projector Films

It's likely that people aren't investing in your movie because they think they will get rich. They invest in your film because they have an emotional connection to your project.

 

Music

 

How to Enrich Thin Voice - Judy Rodman

Can you turn a weak voice into a Tony Atlas of singing voices? Judy Rodman says it is possible, and she shows you how.

 

How to Sing Harmonies - Getting There

Harmonies are the unsung heroes of most songs. In order for harmonies to work, they have to be virtually invisible.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - May 3, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 26, 2011 Edition

1,312 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, marketing, marketing, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, editing, editing, editor, editor, investors, investors, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, social_media, social_media, singing, singing
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If you are a good steward of your money, you likely won't spend crazy amounts of cash to finance your advertising fund. Even if you have a great deal of expendable income, I wouldn't recommend that you pour all of it into a traditional advertising budget.

 

It's not that I think traditional advertising doesn't work. It can, and I'm proof of that. I own an exercise program because of traditional advertising. I bought that program after seeing the infomercial, or parts of the infomercial, approximately two hundred times. Every Saturday and Sunday, when I would sit in front of the TV in the morning and sip on my coffee, I would see the infomercial on three or four channels as I surfed, looking for something to watch. After a year, I gave in and purchased the program.

 

That's how traditional advertising works. It showcases a slick message surrounded by all the bells and whistles and finds ways to beat you over the head with it. The magic bullet, here, isn't a bullet at all. It's a hail of magic bullets that keeps coming and coming and coming. In order for that kind of advertising to work for you, most of your money will end up funding your repetition strategy. In other words, how will you get your message in front of the consumer over and over and over again?

 

For most independent artists, this a strategy you can't adequately fund even if you do have crazy amounts of expendable cash. That's why I'm such an advocate of non-traditional online methods, which I've talked about on this blog for some time. They all involve more of an investment of time rather than money. Spend your time blogging. Spend your time on social networks. Spend your time creating personal videos. Save your money for things like professional cover design, formatting, editing, etc.

 

There may be a day when traditional advertising makes sense for you and your project, and you'll know it when that time comes. If you're a first timer, however, you might find it more effective to put away your checkbook and set aside time in the day to work on your online marketing methods.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Your Banner Ad is a Billboard for Your Book, DVD, or CD

Social Networking Sells Your Brand

1,753 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, promotion, advertising, ads, promotions, musicians, filmmakers
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What a Boy Wants

It's no secret that young female readers far outnumber young male readers. The question is why don't boys read? Unfortunately, there is no universal answer. There are indications that it is a cultural flaw. Most boys are taught that physical prowess is much more important that mental prowess during their developmental years. Others believe that it's a simple matter of there being more reading material created for girls than boys. Here's more on the topic from The Tennessean.

 

You've got your typical boys. Then bring in Kelly Miller, assuming the role of the relentless eighth-grade English teacher. She's determined to buck the odds and get all her students - boys and girls - to meet a goal of reading 30 novels this school year. Miller knew the same general facts that had troubled Calame: Boys read less than girls. Surveys show they're more likely to have a negative experience with books. And boys lag behind girls in reading skills.

 

You can read the entire article on The Tennessean's website: How do you get boys into reading? Girls

 

Wheeling and Dealing, Hitchcock-Style

Even the great ones must make compromises and promises to get their films made. And there is no greater one than Alfred Hitchcock. Hitchcock had heard the story of a man, Manny Balestrero, wrongly accused of committing a robbery. He was brought to trial where a mishap with a juror caused a mistrial, and that's when the great director got interested in the real-life story.

 

As "Manny" waited for a retrial, the real robber was arrested while trying to hold up a grocery store. With that arrest, "Manny" was exonerated. After hearing the story, Alfred Hitchcock decided to make a film. He created The Wrong Man and wanted to make the film as real as possible. He approached Judge Groat (the presiding judge) to see if the Court Room in the Queens County Court House could be made available to film a portion of the movie - just as it had happened in real life. Judge Groat said, "Yes, but with one condition." That "condition" required Alfred Hitchcock to speak at a local Young Republican Club.

 

You can read the entire article on AntonNews.com: Remembering Alfred Hitchcock

 

A Voice You Should Know

Every once in a while, a talent comes and goes from this planet that is just too good to let go by without acknowledging. Sadly, Phoebe Snow succumbed to illness at the young age of 60 and passed away last week. For those of you who don't know, Snow was a singer/songwriter who broke onto the music scene in 1974. She had a deeply rich and beautiful bluesy voice that she showcased perfectly with her haunting and moving songs. She gave up music to care for her disabled child. Even though it was a decision that most likely cost her millions of dollars and elite stardom, she never regretted it. Though her life and contribution to music were far too brief, she still left an indelible mark. 

 

Ms. Snow was discovered at the Bitter End in Greenwich Village in 1972 by Dino Airali, a promotion executive for Shelter Records, based in Tulsa, Okla. Mr. Airali and Phil Ramone produced her first record, which included guest performances by Zoot Sims, the Persuasions and Teddy Wilson. Besides "Poetry Man," the most striking original song on her debut album, "I Don't Want the Night to End," is about a lover named Charlie Parker (not the jazz saxophonist), who had died. The introspective, quirky coffeehouse torch-singing of that hit was a style she later largely abandoned to pursue various hybrids of hard rock, soul and gospel.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' websiteHypebot.com: Phoebe Snow, Bluesy Singer-Songwriter, Dies at 60

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 29, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 22, 2011

1,308 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, book, book, music, music, film, film, reading, reading, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Confluence of Pleasures: On Reading and Tuna Fish - The Millions

An essay about those moments when the right book finds you at the right time.     

 

Nonlinear Reading and Other Things Print Books Do Better Than E-books - PWxyz

Is this a case where the "analog" world outdoes the digital world when it comes to nonlinear "technology"?   

 

Film

 

The (Dreaded) Silent Role - A MOON Brothers film

Actors who pass on parts because of lack of dialogue may be missing out on the chance to deliver an Oscar-winning performance.              

 

Beyond a Social Network - The Independent

Yet another article about the changing face of film financing and the world of crowdsourcing.   

 

Music

 

Is the Dedicated Songwriter Going Extinct? - digital music news

The music industry is seeing the demise of songwriting as a reliable source of income. Now, songwriters are being asked to diversify in order to make a living.  

 

6 Things to Help Your Music Marketing This Week - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

Get your notebooks out. Bob Baker is cranking out the free marketing tips.     

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 26, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 19, 2011 Edition

1,365 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, book, book, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, reading, reading, acting, acting, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, songwriting, songwriting, social_media, social_media, crowdsourcing, crowdsourcing
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

10 Good Grammar Resources - Writing Forward

You can never have too many good grammar resources. Use them wisely and write well.

 

How to Craft Compelling Characters - Writer's Digest

David Corbett explores his "foolproof" method for building rich, deep characters.

 

Film

 

Just Get On With It - Projector Films

Is writing for online film projects markedly different than writing for the screen (big or small)?  Filmmaker Tim Clague shares his views on the topic.

 

Lessons Learned on a Microbudget Horror Film - Filmmaking.net

Filmmaker Trevor Munday shares the lessons he learned working behind the camera for the first time.

 

Music

 

Prince Says Life Would Be Better Without Covers... - digital music news

The petite purple-clad pop poet isn't too thrilled that other artists can legally cover his songs without his permission.

 

Monster Records: 3D Model Puzzles from Old Vinyl Records - Indie Music Tech

A cool way to recycle all those old Captain and Tennille records.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 19, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 12, 2011 Edition

1,641 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, writers, writers, writing, writing, characters, characters, musicians, musicians, craft, craft, screenwriting, screenwriting, filmmakers, filmmakers, grammar, grammar
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Three Books for The Grammar Lover In Your Life - NPR

The best thing about the rules of the English language is that they are always changing. Oh, wait, that's the worst part.

 

What Grabs Readers and What Keeps Them - deCOMPOSE

He had me at "Train wrecks grab people's attention. Having someone on board keeps their attention."

 

Film

 

George Lucas: 3D Film-making is the New Colour - Walesonline

Is the master of science fiction right? Will everything be done in 3D in the future? At the risk of the wrath of Lucas, I hope he's wrong.        

 

Crowd Sourcing Funds New Independent Film - Buffalo 123

Do you have funding for your next film? Have you tried crowd sourcing to raise funds?

 

Music

 

Amazing Drummer - Only 3 or 4 Years Old on the Drums - Amazing Drummer

I had to watch this video three times to makes sure it was real. Then I watched it three more times just because I was enjoying myself so much.

 

Is The Music Revolution Over? - Mr. Tunes

Has the music industry lost out to the gaming and social network sites? Mr. Tunes has some thoughts on the subject.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 12, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 5, 2011 Edition

1,533 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, writers, writers, readers, readers, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, grammar, grammar, 3d, 3d, crowdsourcing, crowdsourcing
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Lights, Camera, Action: 3 Words that Aren't Just for the Film Industry Anymore

Being an author today is a lot like being on a tightrope and juggling three chainsaws while doing your taxes and putting on ice skates. There is a lot to do besides the writing. There's the editing and the designing and the blogging and the social networking and the book trailer...Wait, you mean you don't have a book trailer? Author Rye Barcott isn't crazy about them, but he recognizes their importance.

 

Book trailers are relatively recent additions to the literary world. Most of the authors I know detest the very idea of them. We pour our souls into creating a book, a piece of work that can take people deep into places, problems, and things that matter...Can a few minutes on a screen really do justice to such a rich experience? I don't think so. Yet I realize that book trailers are important to me as a reader. I watch them when they appear on Amazon or B&N.com, and for books I don't know much about, the trailer often influences my decision to buy.

 

You can read the entire article on Mashable.com: Why Book Trailers Are Now Essential to the Publishing Industry

 

Is There Job Security in Hollywood?

You have to figure that a proven track record of raking in tons of money for a Hollywood studio means you can pretty much write your own ticket, right? You're the big cheese that brings in the big dough. There's no need to keep looking in the want ads. Well, the recent ousting of a Warner Brothers studio executive who was behind films that collectively made billions of dollars has some people in the industry wondering if there's any such thing as job security in Hollywood.

 

The upshot, say longtime industry watchers, is that Hollywood's clubby, insular business culture is fraying as studios grow ever more corporate and answer to multinational companies that either don't know the customs of Hollywood or don't care about them. Columbia Pictures, Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Universal Pictures and Warner all answer to bosses in New York. Walt Disney Studios is the sole major film operation that has a local owner.

 

You can read the entire article on The New York Times' website: In Hollywood, a Decade of Hits Is No Longer Enough

 

Are You Busking?

I learned a new word. Busking is the act of performing on the street for money. Now, as a writer, there's very little call for me to type on my laptop in public. I've done it before, but no one's ever given me a quarter for it. But some musicians have a lot of success busking. In fact, musician Chris Seth Jackson says that it might even be a crucial ingredient to earning a living as a musician.

 

Physically busking in one area is limited to only that one city and the people only walking by at that particular time. YouTube is global and timeless. Record yourself playing your music daily and throw it out to the world on YouTube. Record yourself while you're busking on the street. At the end of your YouTube busking, add a call to action. Give a link to your website and ask for 25 cents. On your site, provide people a way to donate a small amount of money to you. PayPal has options for micro transactions. Use it! The good ol' long tail theory could net you a bit of cash over the life of this YouTube post.

 

You can read the entire article on How to Run a Band: Want To Make $50,000 a Year In Music? Start With One Dollar a Day

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 8, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 1, 2011

1,378 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, filmmaking, filmmaking, promotion, promotion, trailer, trailer, promotions, promotions, hollywood, hollywood, performing, performing, musicians, musicians, book_trailer, book_trailer
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

 

Books/Publishing

 

 

Famous Authors and Their Typewriters - Flavorwire

This is a fun site. See if you can spot your favorite author sitting behind his or her typewriter. 

 

 

What I've Learned from Judging Writing Contests - Jody Hedlund

Author Jody Hedlund shares her experiences as a judge in a writing contest. What did she learn? She learned she could spot those authors who are on the verge of making it.

 

 

Film

 

 

Film Commission to Present Symposium on First Female Filmmaker - Fort Lee Patch

She began her film career in the 1890s. She owned a studio and produced hundreds of films. Do you know her name?

 

 

Do Not Quit Before the World Opens Its Eyes - Film Courage

Not every great piece of art was appreciated in the beginning. Sometimes it takes time for people to recognize brilliance.

 

 

Music

 

 

How to Make Music Bloggers and Web Site Owners Ignore You - Renegade Producer

The Renegade Producer gives his best advice as an industry blogger on how to capture his attention if you want him to listen to your music.

 

 

Bands Date Brands to Meet Fans - Music Industry Newswire

We've all heard of product placement in TV shows and films, but is there a place for it in music? Can bands get into the business of brand integration?

 

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - April 5, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 29, 2011 Edition

1,462 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, writers, writers, writing, writing, contests, contests, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Personally, I like to think I am above all things pop culture. There are so many other things going on in the world that deserve my attention. World peace, world hunger, and other important world stuff...They all merit more of my time than the viral video that's currently blowing up on the internet or the celebrity who is acting a bit on the strange side. I shouldn't care about such things. I mustn't care about such things. I won't care about such things.

 

 

Aw, who am I kidding? I do care about that silly stuff, and so should you. Why? Because pop culture has long coattails that you can ride as a blogger. Those stories that you get tired of seeing all over the place are the kind of stories that can drive traffic to your blog. Those readers who find your blog because they're hunting down more information on the latest pop culture sensation can be converted to regular visitors if they like what they read. What they're reading is your take on the story, which in turn gives them their first glimpse into your brand.

 

 

I'll often write posts about how fed up I am about being inundated with information on pop culture events or phenomenon, and this will inevitably lead to someone posting a comment stating that they couldn't agree more. This kind of interaction opens a dialogue between you and your readers, giving you the opportunity to make a personal connection with your audience. Pop culture is something we all love to hate and can't get enough of (even while we're saying we can't take anymore).

 

 

As painful as it can be, I think it's a good idea for artists to act as commentators on pop culture. Look at it as an opportunity to bring a voice of reason and class to an otherwise inane topic. Write about the important issues as well, but make some space for those topics that probably won't change the world. Like it or not, they result in hits on your blog and, ultimately, help your product.

 

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Resources to Help You Blog Daily

Bloggers, Ask Yourselves These Five Questions

1,393 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, blog, promotion, blogging, musicians, filmmakers, branding
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With Great Opportunity Comes Great Responsibility

 

Just because the barriers to publishing are gone doesn't mean the writing doesn't matter. The writing matters. Granted, so does the marketing. Unfortunately, good writing alone doesn't ensure success. The reclusive author may be a relic of the non-internet world. Those who don't build and cultivate relationships on social networks and using other online strategies will most likely go unnoticed. My advice: market tirelessly and write brilliantly. That way, you'll deserve the success you find. Laura Miller of Salon.com weighs in on the changing responsibilities of authors.

 

 

It has become a mantra that today's author - whether self- or conventionally published - must learn to promote his or her books. Some, like Eisler and Hocking, happen to be good at it, but many aren't. People often become writers because they're introverted or awkward in personal encounters and have poured everything they want to say to the world into their work. What usually gets lost in the perpetual refrain about authors becoming their own marketers is that there's no particular connection between writing talent and a gift for self-promotion.

 

 

You can read the entire article on Salon.com's website: Author, sell thyself

 

 

Two Thumbs Up to Roger Ebert for Getting It Right

 

We've seen a lot of changes in home entertainment over the years. I didn't have cable TV until I was 12 years old. Now, I get TV shows on my phone. The sad thing is the picture on my phone is better than the picture on my family's TV when I was a kid. Who could have foreseen the almost miraculous changes in TV and movies in such a short period of time? Roger Ebert, that's who. Here's what he said in an interview in 1987.

 

 

We will have high-definition, wide-screen television sets and a push-button dialing system to order the movie you want at the time you want it. You'll not go to a video store but instead order a movie on demand and then pay for it. Videocassette tapes as we know them now will be obsolete both for showing prerecorded movies and for recording movies.

 

 

You can read the entire article on The Los Angeles Times' Website: Roger Ebert predicted the future of the movies in 1987

 

 

Non-linear Marketing

 

The internet has introduced something to the music industry that has shaken its foundation. That something is lack of control. There used to be a separation between musicians and fans that the industry took advantage of by shaping the relationship between their artists and fans. The internet has removed that separation and successful musicians are interacting with their fan base like never before. According to Bas Grasmayer of Hypebot.com, that interaction is a major component of music sales today.

 

 

This is where you start stimulating the non-linear communication. Treat every listener as a guest to your house party. If you don't introduce them to others, you'll be the center of attention all the time, but you can't talk to everyone at the same time, so people are likely to get bored and leave. The key to a successful party is connecting the strangers, so they can have fun together. You're still the center of the ecosystem, but you're not the only person to communicate to. The communication becomes non-linear!

 

 

You can read the entire article on Hypebot.com: The Ecosystem Approach: Introducing Non-Linear Music Marketing for the Digital Age

 

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - April 1, 2011

Weekly News Brief - Books, Film, Music - March 25, 2011

1,315 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, authors, marketing, marketing, entertainment, entertainment, technology, technology, promotion, promotion, writers, writers, writing, writing, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Riverton Woman Says Editing 'Potter' Books Was Top-secret Job - SJ-R.Com

Sure she got to see the Harry Potter books before everyone else, but she couldn't tell anyone.

 

Is the Short Story Really the Novel's Poor Relation? - Guardian Book Blog

Do short stories have a place in today's world? Frankly, they may be more relevant today than at any other time.

 

Film

 

What if Star Wars Had Never Existed? - Guardian Film Blog

Would we even know what outer space looks like without George Lucas? Sure there was that whole Apollo project thing at NASA, but those spaceships weren't nearly as cool.

 

Independent Filmmaking - A Creative Labor of Love - Ai InSite

Studio films may have major financing, but independent filmmakers have much more freedom to make the films they want to make.

 

Music

 

Two Ways to Rehearse for Best Vocal Performance - Judy Rodman

Train your voice and your mind to get the optimum performance.

 

Open a Piano, Literally, as a First Step in Learning to Read Music - Music After 50

"Every Goat Breaks Down Fences." Trust me; it makes sense if you read the post.

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 29, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 22, 2011 Edition

1,421 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, music, music, filmmaking, filmmaking, editing, editing, story, story, films, films, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers, singing, singing, short_story, short_story
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If you frequent this blog, you know by now that I am a big fan of author blogs. I am of the opinion that if you have a book on the market, you have a need for your own personal space on the internet where you dynamically showcase your author brand. There is no better way to do that than with your own blog.

 

In order to display the brand that is you, you need to know yourself. As funny as that may sound, there are a lot of people who aren't really in touch with themselves. As a result, they misrepresent their personal brand on their own blog, and in the process, they create a flat, dispassionate brand.

 

So, here are five questions to ask yourself to help you fine tune and shape your personal brand:

 

  1. Are you funny? This may be a difficult question for you to answer, because most people believe they have a good sense of humor yet not everyone does. So, dig deep on this one and make an honest evaluation of your ability to make people laugh.
  2. Do you care if other people think you are funny? You may be the kind of person who doesn't care what people think about your sense of humor. It doesn't define you. That speaks of a kind of confidence that could be infectious in a blog environment.
  3. Are you political? Let's face it, political issues can spark a lot of debate and heat up a blog like nothing else. If you have no interest in politics, however, don't write about that on your blog just because you think it will bring in visitors. Your goal is to be authentic. Forcing yourself to write about something on your blog just for the purpose of increasing traffic is transparent and ineffective. Be yourself, and the traffic will come.
  4. What are you passionate about? This is the meat of it. Your blog will gain readers if you write about what drives you. What is your passion?
  5. What is on your "bucket list"? What are all the things you want to do before you die? Sit down and make a long list of things you think will give your life meaning. This is a great way to identify and tap into your passions. Nothing is out of reach.

 

Once you answer these questions, you should have a pretty good idea of who you are and what your blogging style should be as you move forward. Know thyself and your personal brand will flourish.

 

What questions did I miss that will help you tap into yourself and create an authentic personal brand?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Evaluating Your Author Brand

Authors' Four Structural Essentials for Blogs

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Welcome to Tuesday's blog roundup. This is the day we shine the spotlight on bloggers and artists in the publishing, film and music industries.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Social Media: There's No Such Thing as Too Early - Nathan Bransford

Never were truer words written. It is never too early or late to start building your network.

 

The Delete Key: The Published Writer's Best Friend - Storytellers Unplugged

It's all about the rewrite. The pain intensifies with each word you delete, but the pain will bring you closer to a better story.

 

Film

 

Selling a Film without a Name Actor - Making the Movie

If no one has heard of the lead or the supporting cast in your film, make the story the selling point.

 

Tips on Securing Broadcast on National Public Television - the independent

Documentary filmmaker Jennifer Owensby Sanza shares her journey navigating through the public broadcasting submission process for filmmakers.

 

Music

 

The Surprising Truth about Making a Living with Music in 2011 & Beyond - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

How promising is a career in music these days? According to Bob Baker, things aren't dire as some are predicting.

 

Visual History of Hot Haircuts in Popular Music - The Curious Brain

Call it a flowchart of hairstyles. Do you have a 'do made for Rock 'n' Roll?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 22, 2011 Edition

Tuesday's Blog Roundup - March 15, 2011 Edition

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There's no doubt that volume is a key component in driving traffic to your blog. Part-time blogs are fine if it's just a vanity project. Posting on your blog whenever the mood strikes is great for getting things off your chest, but it doesn't do a lot to expose your personal brand to a large number of people. My recommendation is to find the time to blog once a day. That may sound outrageous, and it can be a little daunting in the beginning, but like anything that takes commitment, it will get easier to do over time.

 

The number one way to increase your blogging activity is to read other blogs and news sites daily. Work it into your morning routine. Pour yourself a cup of coffee or tea and browse the web for stories that strike your fancy. Here are some sites that provide links to the top stories of the day or their own unique commentary on the current headlines.

 

Alltop - The word Alltop is taken from "All Topics," and that's what Alltop is: a collection of websites and blogs that cover a wide range of topics. They provide a variety of categories for you to choose from. Once you select a category, you'll be directed to a page with links to blogs and websites that cover the topic you selected.

 

BoingBoing - This is a website started by science fiction author Cory Doctorow as a side project. It has since grown into a full-fledged source of news and information covering topics such as technology, gadgets, culture, games, entertainment, science, business, art and design, video, and more.

 

Mashable - Think of Mashable as all things technology. Want to know when the next greatest thing in social media is coming out? Mashable will probably be the first to report it. Want to know who the new YouTube star is or the latest author to make the most of new media strategies? Mashable will most likely be the first to bring them to your attention.

 

There are plenty of other sites to choose from, but these are the ones I utilize most. If the top stories of the day are what interest you most, you can visit sites like Yahoo.com and MSN.com for a list of the biggest news stories. Whichever sites you visit most often, use them to ignite the blogger inside of you and spend about 30 minutes a day writing a post for your own blog.

 

Which blogs do you read most often and why?

 

-Richard

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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The Short and Long of Blog Posts

Need to Blog, but Short on Time?

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