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Don't Force an Ending

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 25, 2015

I just want to warn you that there's this little-known song from a movie that barely made any money at the box office that I'm going to reference in this blog post. It comes from an obscure animated flick called Frozen and the song title is "Let It Go." Oh, you've heard of it? Good, then I can spare you the video of me singing this catchy tune.

 

 

That is the wisdom I wish to impart on you today: let it go. Can't find an ending for that book you've worked so hard on for months? Let it go. What? You say it's been years? Let it go. Endings can't be forced. Well, they can, but they usually come off sounding that way. Your best strategy is to move on to the next project. Shed the frustrating missteps from your mind when it comes to finding the perfect ending, and redirect your creativity.

 

 

Albert Einstein didn't come up with the Theory of Relativity sitting in front of a chalkboard hammering out formulas and chasing mathematical equations down a rabbit hole. He came up with the idea as a clerk at the patent office staring out the window. In other words, he wasn't focused on revolutionizing physics. He was daydreaming. Had he been focused on making a great discovery at that particular moment, who knows, would he have developed the most famous scientific discovery of the modern age?

 

 

The ending will come to you when you let go of the need to find the ending. In a weird metaphysical way, stories don't like to remain unfinished. Your brain will find its way there on its own. If you force it, your brain will fight you and give your story an unsatisfying ending. Stop fixating, and start daydreaming. Let it go.

 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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When Do You Know The Ending?

Know Thy Story

1,061 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, book, writers, publishing, writing, craft, ending, writing_advice, writing_tip
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There's no rule in fiction that says everything - or anything, actually - has to be factually accurate. However, today I'd like to make a case for why you should be careful not to be too loose with details if you set your story in a real place.

 

I recently read a book that mostly takes place in my hometown. Unfortunately, within two pages the author mentioned a major street in a way that made no sense, causing confusion. I could have let that slip, but then it happened again, and again, and again, each lapse taking a different shape or size - yet each one distracting my focus from the plot. (For example, one scene described a quick cab ride to another town that took about ten minutes, a trip that in real life would take at least an hour, if not more.)

 

It was clear that the author knew very little about my hometown, which is hardly a crime, but as I read, I couldn't help but wonder why the author didn't just do a little bit of fact checking. (By the way, I'm not talking about a tiny little town in the middle of nowhere. Even Google maps would have done the trick.)

 

My new book (Wait for the Rain) is set mostly on a tropical island that I made up, which meant I didn't have to worry about any of the above issues. However, a few scenes take place in a Midwestern city I've visited but only briefly. To make sure I got everything correct, I consulted with two friends who live in the area. If you find yourself in a similar situation, I suggest you do the same. You want readers to get lost in your story, not fixate on inaccuracies that yank them back to reality.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Fiction Writing vs. Nonfiction Writing

Productivity vs. Perfection

1,109 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, writing, fiction, fact_checking
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For some authors, there is a very understandable hesitation at associating their writing efforts with marketing efforts. In short, authors don't like to be thought of as a brand. They don't like everything they do to be associated with building said brand. They have a strong distaste for brand talk, and I get it. After all, isn't branding just a contrived exercise, made up of insincere tactics, to create an image for an author that appeals to as many people as possible?

 

No, but that is how many authors perceive branding. Branding, in the realm of the author, is nothing more than a public representation of your true self. It's you being you on a blog, within your social media circles, or on your YouTube channel. It's not you being what you think your readers want or what will help you sell the most books. That's called spin, and it has a short shelf life that eventually will spin out of control and cost you sales.

 

Like it or not, you are a brand, and your brand identity stems from your core values. Your basic beliefs dictate your brand decisions. So, do you know what your core values are? I know it sounds like an insane question. Most people know what they believe, right? Not necessarily. They know what they like and what they dislike, but, more times than not, they can't identify why.

 

Here's my challenge to you: identify the top three things that make you happy and three things that make you angry. Provide a short defense for each item in your list. Explore why each item made the list. When you're done, you'll have a better understanding of your core values, and moving forward, your brand will have a more authentic and confident voice.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Is Podcasting Right for You?

Social Media Swap

1,364 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, branding
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Commonly Confused Words: How to Avoid These Grammar Gaffes - Huffington Post

Direct objects, nouns, verbs, time sequences and comparisons: These are things to guide you down the grammar path.        

                           

How to Get Influencers to Notice You - The Future of Ink

Looking for an endorsement for your next book?          

 

Film

                                                        

Nine Things Artists Do to Hold Back Themselves and Their Work - Film Courage

Avoid the chaos and move forward.      

                                          

Using a Motivated Key Light - Filmmaker IQ

What do you get when you mix practicals with additional lights?   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Simple Rhythm Hacks for Musicians - Artiden

When you're a pianist, drills alone won't help you find your rhythm.  

  

Five Steps: How to Record Better Vocals - Made 2 Create

Quit relying on technology to fix vocal mistakes.    

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- February 13, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- February 6, 2015

1,109 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, music, filmmaking, author, indie, writers, writing, films, musicians, filmmakers, grammar
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For my newest book (Wait for the Rain, releasing February 24), my publisher and I were torn between several cover options, so we narrowed it down to two and then put it out to my fans to vote. Needless to say, I was thrilled by this suggestion, and my fans loved it too! I asked them to weigh in by a certain date via my newsletter, my Facebook page or Twitter, and the response was better than I ever expected. (Click here to see the winning cover.)

 

I highly suggest you do something similar (might be fun to ask them for help choosing a title as well.) Not only will it generate interest in your book, it will give you a chance to personally engage with your readers.

 

One of the most common questions I get from first-time authors is "what should I put into a newsletter/Twitter feed/Facebook page/etc.?" This is a wonderful example, and it's so easy to do! For my cover campaign we offered an incentive to vote: a signed copy, whose winner would be chosen at random. I posted the news on LinkedIn too, which led to a new crop of voters who hadn't read any of my books - but now maybe they will because they are invested in the process. The same happened with Twitter. People retweeted my tweet about the contest, which led to more votes from potential readers.

 

I have no way of knowing if any of these people will actually buy a copy of Wait for the Rain, but it sure doesn't hurt that they know about it. That's the thing with book marketing: You never know for sure if something's going to sell books, but it's worth trying almost anything once.

 

If any of you reading this post follow my lead, please let me know. I'd love to hear how it goes!

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Considering a Reader's Suggestion

Looking for Marketing Tips? Here's What's Working for One Indie Author - and What Isn't

1,313 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writers, branding, marketing_tip
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Unless you have been living under a rock, you have probably heard of the podcast Serial. On the slim chance you haven't heard of it, allow me to inform you. Serial is an audio series by Sarah Koenig that tells the true story of a murder in Baltimore, Maryland. Each of the 12 episodes tells one aspect of the story. It is a simple, yet compelling telling of a mystery that has become wildly popular.

 

That last bit is important for those of us looking for marketing ideas. Serial has become so talked about it has reached zeitgeist status. The podcast trend is officially on the rise thanks to Koenig. People with nothing more than a smartphone are starting to record and upload their own podcast masterpieces in the hopes of duplicating the same viral magic.

 

The problem is that these things can rarely be duplicated because there's an effort to duplicate something that already exists. If you want to start a podcast in an effort to build your author brand, make it true to your brand - not Sarah Koenig's brand. Be you; don't be her.

 

The first thing you're going to want to decide is if podcasting is right for you. One reason Serial worked is because it was a planned 12-episdoe series that was carefully crafted with stellar production values. Do you have that in you? Another reason it worked is because the material was ripe for the telling. You have great material, but can you design it episodically to enthrall listeners and keep them coming back for more?

 

If you decide that podcasting is for you and your material, then congratulations! You have an excellent tool not just for storytelling, but for building your brand.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Introverted Authors: More Bang for Your Book

Marketing: Begin with Your Strengths

1,362 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, serial, social_media
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Research Your Crime Novel - Writer's Digest

Crime scene descriptions, forensics, police interrogation tactics: just how far do you have to go to research your crime novel?       

                           

The Story Grid. How to Tell a Story and Edit Your Fiction with Shawn Coyne - The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn interviews Shawn Coyne about keeping a reader engaged enough to purchase your next book.          

 

Film

                                                        

How to Network in Hollywood (or Anywhere, Really) - Filmmaking Stuff

When raising money for a film, remember not to make the conversations exclusively about you.       

                                          

Ten Lessons on Filmmaking from David Lynch - Filmmaker Magazine

David Lynch is one of the most innovative filmmakers working today.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Vocal Performance and Acting Technique: Making Choices - Judy Rodman

Lights. Camera. Sing.   

 

Should You Run Paid Ads to Promote Your Music? -  Bob Baker's TheBuzzFactor.com

What to consider before you pay to advertise your band.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup- February 6, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 30, 2015

1,243 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, music, author, movies, musicians, filmmakers
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You Are an Artist

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 11, 2015

You are not just a writer. You are an artist. If you create, you dabble in the arts. There is just no escaping it. So, what are you doing to build your brand as an artist in your local community?

 

Chances are you are not doing anything, and that's okay. A lot of authors neglect to sell themselves as artists. We adopt the mind-set that ours is strictly a commercial endeavor, when that's only half the story. We are artists, same as painters with galleries, same as playwrights and actors working in theater, same as photographers with upcoming exhibits. These are our peers.

 

I'm stressing your classification as an artist because I want you to start presenting yourself as an artist and building connections within your local arts scene. The best way to do that is to become a participant on a board or committee for various organizations that support the arts. For example, if there's a community theater in your area, chances are they are in need of volunteers to either serve on the board or assist during productions in some capacity. A museum or art gallery in town may need volunteers to help organize shows. Or there may be a local film society that needs your creative input.

 

By getting involved in the art community and volunteering your time, you're building contacts and your reputation as a serious contributor to the art scene. You'll have support for your next book launch or reading.

 

Remember, you are not just a writer. You are an artist. Reach out to your fellow artists, and start the process of building your local artist brand.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Science Can Help You Be a Better Artist!

Four Tips for Real-Life Networking

1,701 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, artist
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As we make our way into 2015, I suggest making a concerted effort this year to have at least one copy of your book with you wherever you go. You never know when you're going to come across a potential reader, so it's best to be prepared. I've sold many books over the years simply because I had a copy with me. The reality is that most people will go their entire lives without meeting an author, so when it happens, they are often excited to buy a signed copy. Why? Because even if they don't plan to read it, having a personalized autographed copy of a book is cool! And who knows? Maybe they will read it, love it, write a glowing review about it on Amazon and Goodreads, then tell their friends to read it, or even buy copies for their friends as gifts.

 

Here are some places I have sold and/or given away my books:

 

  • Airplane
  • Train
  • College alumni networking event
  • Dentist's office
  • Holiday cocktail party
  • Starbucks
  • Optometrist's office
  • Yoga studio
  • Friend's barbecue

 

As I mentioned above, I've also given many copies away, which is a good strategy when the recipients are the kind of people who are likely to share their opinions on social media, etc., or are in a clear position to help you if they enjoy the book.

 

I realize that carrying a book around isn't always practical, especially if you don't use a purse. But if you have a car, it is definitely doable. Just toss a few copies in the trunk, and you're good to go. The key is to do your best to be consistent because you just never know whom you're going to meet while waiting in line for that latte.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Guerrilla Book Marketing Tactic

Why You Should Give Away (Some) Books for Free

1,645 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, author, writing, promotions
10

I'm experiencing something weird as a writer. I know the ending of a story before I've finished writing the book. It's happened to me a few times before, but normally the process is a tad bit murkier for me when it comes to plotting the ending. I usually don't know the ending until I finish the first rewrite and even then, it may change by the time I'm done with the second rewrite.

 

This time, however, the ending is clearer in my mind's eye than it ever has been before, and I'm not even halfway through the first draft. Now, I didn't know the ending when I started the book, but by the time I got done with the first major scene, the ending smacked me in the face in the most glorious way possible.

 

When do you know the ending of your stories? Do you know it before you ever start writing? Do you know it before you reach the conclusion? Or do you complete a draft without a clear ending and then hammer it out during rewrites? I've experienced the ending epiphany, and I have to say, knowing the ending before the first draft is done is thrilling. I wake up every day with a little extra writing oomph because I'm so anxious to write the ending scene with all the fictional tentacles attached to it. That's not to say I don't enjoy writing when I don't know the ending. I do. The journey is just different.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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A Satisfactory Ending

What Matters More: The Beginning or the Ending?

1,465 Views 10 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, fiction, ending
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The following exchange happened in a workshop after a public reading of some new material by an unnamed writer:

 

 

Facilitator: Do you know who the characters are in this scene? What about the woman? Where is she coming from? Why is she so hostile towards the man? Is she the good guy or the bad guy? What is her motivation?

 

Writer: She's his niece, and she hates him, but she is committed to taking care of him because she made a promise to her father, before he died, that she would watch after his alcoholic brother.

 

Facilitator: This is revealed later on in the story?

 

Writer: No. It's just stuff I've uncovered along the way that didn't make it into the story.

 

Facilitator: Excellent! That's exactly what I wanted to hear. You know what's not on the page. You know these characters.

 

Why is it important that you know what's not on the page? After all, if it's not read, why does it matter? It matters because it gives you, the writer, two essential storytelling tools: confidence and boundaries. The confidence will help you write from a position of strength. You'll know how to maneuver through a story because you know the bigger picture. You'll not only know what motivates your characters, you'll also know what kills their spirits and causes them to give up.

 

 

The boundaries will inform you on the choices your characters make. You'll know without hesitation why they behave in the way that they do. You will know the lines that can't be crossed without consequences.

 

 

When you know what's not on the page, you know what belongs on the page.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Can Visualization Help You Finish That Manuscript?

Reality Check: Remember Why You Wrote Your Book in the First Place

1,527 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, author, writers, writing, workshop, book_clubs, writing_workshop
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In my first job out of college, one of my assignments was to co-write an opinion piece for my boss. (In this case, "co-write" meant "write.") He told me the points he wanted to make, and my role was to turn those ideas into a clear, readable argument that a prominent magazine in our industry would accept. Both of us would get the byline, so I was excited!

 

I'll never forget my boss'ss reaction when I proudly showed him my masterpiece. He smiled at me, then sighed and said something along the lines of, "Ah, how difficult to part with young words."

 

At first I didn't understand what he meant, but then he (tactfully) explained to me that the essay would be much better if I cut out about a third of it. He also said he understood that it would be hard for me to delete words I'd taken such precious time coming up with in the first place. My twenty-two-year-old ego was bruised by his reaction to my hard work, but when I read what I'd written again, I realized something: He was right.

 

I'd gotten so wrapped up in the thrill of seeing my own words in a magazine that I overdid it and lost sight of the point of the assignment - to make a clear, readable argument. And yes, while it was hard to part with those words, the revised essay was much better as a result.

 

The experience provided me with a valuable lesson. Even though I now write novels for a living, I still have a tendency to, shall I say, overstate the point - especially in the early chapters when I'm still figuring things out. In the revision process of my latest book, my editor marked several sections as "already stated" or "already made clear" and (strongly) suggested that I delete them, which I quickly did. And guess what? My feelings weren't hurt. Growth all the way around!

 

Note: In this post I'm talking about repetition of information or concepts. Click here to read my post about what to do with entire scenes that end up on the cutting room floor.

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor and the best-selling author of the Waverly Bryson series, Cassidy Lane, Katwalk, and Wait for the Rain. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Have questions for Maria? You can find her at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Writing Takes Discipline

Four Forms of Creativity Fuel

1,583 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, editing, author, writing
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Social Media Swap

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Feb 2, 2015

You have a resource that more than likely you have been ignoring as a marketing and branding tool. It may have never occurred to you that you are not alone. You have fellow authors that are also working all the angles to market their books and build their brands. They too are overlooking the same marketing opportunity you are overlooking.

 

You do, I hope, have an active presence on social media. You are, I hope, friends with other authors on social media. They have their own sets of friends and followers. You have your own set of friends and followers. Why not combine the two? How, you might ask? With a little something I call a social media swap. Here's how it works:

 

Contact an author in your midst, and propose that you do a two-way interview on Facebook. You will both gain exposure with the other's friends and fans. You could even set up a Skype interview to utilize video. Or, if the other happens to live in your local area, you could set up an in-person on-camera interview.

 

You don't want to pick just any author for a social media swap. You want to pick an author who writes in your genre, and you want to pick an author whose work you've read. If you pick an author outside of your genre, you're fishing in the wrong pond. If you pick an author who you don't respect as a writer, you run the risk of tying your brand to an author your audience also might not respect.

 

When you are trying to build an author brand and market a book, it's important to keep in mind you're not the only one trying to build an author brand and market a book. Reach out to your fellow authors and make a proposal that could help you both.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

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Three Things to Avoid When Looking for a Review

My Beta Readers Experience

1,691 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, social_media
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Eleven Secrets to Writing Effective Character Description - Writer's Digest

Avoid bullet point descriptions.       

                           

When Are You Done? - The Seekers

How do you know when it's the end of your story?         

 

Film

                                                        

Minimum Cost a Filmmaker Will Spend on a Film Festival Publicist by Diane Bell and Chris Byrne of RebelHeartFilm.com - Film Courage

Getting into a film festival is great, but it does come with a cost.       

                                          

Do We Really Want Our Digital Footage to Look Like Film? Or Are We Actually Chasing the "Alexa" Look? - Noam Kroll

Some filmmakers may actually want a high-end digital image instead of the film-look.   

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

Numb Singing or Speaking Voice? Question: What Are You Looking At? - Judy Rodman

What is your eye language?  

 

Why Music Matters - Hooks and Harmony

Music is good for the soul.   

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Weekly News Roundup- January 23, 2015

Weekly News Roundup- January 16, 2015

1,313 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, film, author, self-publishing, promotion, writers, blogging, publishing, writing, promotions, musicians, filmmakers, branding, social_media
1

For quite some time now, I've been recommending that authors use their email signatures as an indirect way to promote their work. Apparently a lot of you are taking my advice, because almost all the emails I get these days from authors mention their book(s) in their email signatures.

 

Nice!

 

Unfortunately, however, many of the emails I get from authors also go overboard on the self-promotion in the signature - which defeats the purpose. You want your email signature to get me to want to check out your writing, not to feel overwhelmed by all the hyperlinks - and underwhelmed by the content/professionalism.

 

Here are some quick dos and don'ts for email signatures:

 

  • DO include a brief, compelling line about your work that shows the recipient it's worth reading
  • DO embed a crisp hyperlink to your website or Amazon author page
  • DON'T tell the email recipient how wonderful/amazing/riveting/funny your work is
  • DON'T list complete URLs - in other words, embed them to keep it clean
  • DON'T include hyperlinks to every book you've ever written
  • DON'T include links to ALL your social media accounts (these should be easily found on your website and/or Amazon author page)

 

 

If your email signature is crisp, engaging, and pretty to look at, you'll have a much better chance of piquing a potential reader's interest than if you conclude your messages with 10 inches of gobbledygook. (Yes, I've received emails with signatures that are that long, include multiple ugly hyperlinks, and are over the top with flattering book descriptions.)

 

 

If you think of your email signature as a virtual business card, that approach should steer you in the right direction. Its purpose should be to open doors to future relationships (i.e. readers and sales), not to close them.

 

 

-Maria

 

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life, Honey on Your Mind, Chocolate for Two, Cassidy Lane, and Katwalk. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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The Marketing Maze

Email Signatures: What's In a Name?

2,038 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, marketing, writing, promotions, email_signatures
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