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691 Posts tagged with the writing tag
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Let's Talk Subtitles

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Oct 16, 2013

I recently wrote a post about book titles and gave some examples of titles on the New York Times Best Sellers list. Today, I'd like to continue with that theme and discuss subtitles.

 

Novels don't often include subtitles, nothing substantial at any rate. But nonfiction has been known for its long and descriptive subtitles for eons. At this very moment, I'm looking at one of my favorite works of nonfiction by Candice Millard, called Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President.

 

I was in an airport about to take a long flight across the country. I'd forgotten my Kindle, and I had no other reading material. I walked into the airport bookstore, and even though I usually prefer fiction, I chose this book. Why? The subtitle hooked me. How could I pass up a book that was about madness and the murder of a president? That's pretty intriguing stuff. 

 

Maybe it's time that subtitles become a fixture of the fiction world, too. In an online world where search engine optimization and keywords are part of the new marketing and book discovery lexicon, it might be prudent to beef up our titles with something beyond the main title. Unravel the mystery of what your book is about by saying it in the subtitle. Pique your potential readers' interest at first glance. Hook them and draw them to your book's description and beyond. All those things could be accomplished with a subtitle.

 

Have you ever used a subtitle for a book? If so, do you think it helped your marketing efforts?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Can Your Book Title Affect the Way You Write?

Wear Many Hats to Write a Better Book

3,342 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, titles, writing, subtitles
2

I remember the moment I decided I could write a novel. I had written a few screenplays and had some mild interest here and there from production companies, but nothing worth going into detail about. I thought I had hit the writing wall. I had no place to go with something that I was sure would be nothing more than a hobby. I had hammered out one novel, too, but it was an unmitigated mess.

 

Then, in 1998, I picked up Bag of Bones by Stephen King. I was amazed by the writing, not because it was high-minded or dense or difficult, but because it was simple, yet utterly compelling. To me, it bordered on being magical. That book convinced me that I could write a novel. So, within days of finishing Bag of Bones, I started crafting my second book. It wasn't anywhere near the quality of Mr. King's work, but I felt I had learned something from him. I kept it simple, and I just told a story.

 

Since that day, I've been influenced by books like The Road by Cormac McCarthy, The Plot Against America by Philip Roth, God's Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell and so on. I've learned something about writing from all of these books, including character development and structuring dialogue. But by far, Bag of Bones is the seminal book that turned me into a novelist because it demystified the structure of a novel and made it far less scary - which is ironic considering it was a Stephen King novel.

 

How about you? What book moved you to try your hand at novel writing? What elements of the book inspired you to take the leap?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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How to be a Confident Writer

Enjoy What You Write

3,010 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, craft
4

Who do you write for? When you sit down at your computer or pull out your notepad to jot down ideas, plots, character traits, etc., who are you focusing on? Is it your readers, your critics, your mom, your spouse? 

 

Personally, I write for no one. That's not to say there aren't people I don't want to please or impress. There are a slew of folks who have even inspired me as a writer, but when it comes to putting ideas into action, I don't conjure them up mentally to etch out my story.

 

I understand that writing for someone can give you the motivation to see a book through, but if you write with someone in mind, you may struggle to avoid censoring yourself. Sometimes, even in uplifting stories, it's necessary to dip into the dark crevasses of creativity and put characters in situations that are ugly and unseemly. I find it hard to go to those dark places if I'm writing for a particular person or persons. 

 

You will be much better off dedicating a book to someone after you've thought through the entire story, when you've already visited the seedy places in your mind that aren't exactly welcoming or enriching, and when you've written a book that in its entirety is a solid story filled with three-dimensional characters and twists and turns that drive it to completion.

 

Free yourself from the constraints of external influences. While you're in the throes of writing, do it with a reckless abandon that allows you to expand your vision and see things from a deeply rooted creative perspective. Don't write for anyone except the characters in your story.  

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Keep Them Guessing to Keep Them Reading

Write without Judgment

2,887 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, author, writers, readers, writing, craft, audience, target_audience
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Making Your Book Attractive for Book Clubs -Duolit

Getting noticed by a book club isn't easy, but Stephen McCutchan shares some tips that helped him do just that.                                                     

                                       

7 Questions to Ask Before You Write a Nonfiction Book -The BookBaby Blog

Bobbi Linkemer dishes out her advice on writing a nonfiction book.

 

Film

 

Filmmaking: Making a Little Go Further - Business 2 Community

How independent filmmakers stretch a dollar.

 

Indie Beat: The Road to Sustainable Filmmaking - Twitch

Have the worlds of raising financing and finding an audience merged?

                                    

Music

 

Hey Musicians, Does Crowd Size Matter? - Musicgoat

Do you need the room to be packed in order to play your best?

 

Silence vs. Playing -Ashley Saunders

Not playing a note is just as important as playing a note when it comes to music.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 27, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 20, 2013

2,050 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, marketing, selling, music, filmmaking, film, indie, movies, writers, writing, nonfiction, films, musicians, craft, filmmakers, social_media, book_clubs
4

Bad reviews can be like a punch to the heart. Sometimes even mediocre reviews pack a bit of a wallop that can stagger the ego. But this may surprise you: at times even good reviews are a little tough to handle - not because they're devastating, but for an entirely different reason.

 

Don't get me wrong. I love positive reviews, and I get a warm, tingly feeling from head to toe when I get one. When I'm feeling especially low, I may even hop onto one of my books' Amazon.com pages and read a few of the better reviews to raise my spirits. But positive reviews do come with potential pitfalls.

 

I was once given a fantastic review by a mother who was ecstatic that her son had completed one of my books from cover to cover. She normally couldn't get him to read, but somehow she had talked him into reading my book, and he actually enjoyed it. Had she stopped her review at that point, I would have been left happy and satisfied, but she went on to compliment me for not using excessive profanity.

 

That last little comment terrified me because I happened to be working on a new book that was chockfull of profanity. The story called for it, and I knew it to the very core of my writer's soul, yet I immediately started second-guessing myself. I went through the pages of the new book and tried to soften the language. A reader/fan/mother had reached out to me and specifically complimented my ability to tell a story without excessive profanity. How could I not at the very least entertain the notion of trying to meet her expectations again?

 

In the end, I carried on with the style of writing I had established before I read the positive review. It was tempting to try to please this reader. She had been so flattering and so kind. But had I given in and played it safe, I would have ultimately published a bland story that wouldn't have pleased anyone.

 

So what's the lesson here? Bask in the glow of a positive review. Tell your family and friends about it. Do a happy dance. Celebrate, but don't let it influence your next project. If you do, you run the risk of writing without passion. That's not good for you, the story, or your readers.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Use Good Judgment When Asking for Reviews

Considering a Reader's Suggestion

5,025 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, reviews, writers, writing
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

4 Reasons You Need a Business Plan for Your Book - Writer's Digest

Embrace the entrepreneur inside of you.

 

The Secret to Writing Faster -Backspace

Could the secret to writing faster be ditching technology?

 

Film

 

5 Tips for Creating Your Own Film or Series - backstage

It takes a team to make a film.

 

Joss Whedon on Filmmaking - BAFTA - Filmmaker IQ

From Buffy to The Avengers, Joss Whedon has proven he knows his stuff.

                                    

Music

 

3 Surprising Reasons House Concerts Are Great For Selling Merch and Making New Fans - Musicgoat

It might be time to invite a few hundred of your closest friends over and have a party.

 

Busy Voices: Quick Tabata Exercise for Physical Stamina -Judy Rodman

One must exercise the entire body to keep one's voice physically fit.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 20, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 13, 2013

2,818 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, film, author, movies, writers, writing, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media
7

In a story, you have a Point A and a Point B. These two points are payoff moments that send your story in a certain direction and rock your readers' worlds. They're the parts everyone will be talking about. As a writer, you feel especially proud about the development of these two points in your story. They came out perfectly. But what about the other stuff, the part of your story that got you from point A to point B?

 

Elmore Leonard famously called these the "boring parts," and he handled them by not handling them. He left them out of his story. Now, his genre, the crime novel, allowed for that kind of tactic. There isn't a lot of minutiae in crime novels. The tone calls for a fast pace that allows the readers to fill in a lot of the unsaid action. How a character gets from the elevator to the front door of his apartment isn't necessary to write unless something of note is revealed about the plot in that short trip. 

 

Even if you aren't a crime novelist, there's a lesson here: if you include minutiae, make it count. Be sure it reveals something about the characters, plot or setting. Personally, I don't object to the "boring parts" as long as they are written well. Those parts can help readers become immersed in the story. A good writer can sneak them in without the reader noticing. The more I know about how a character traverses a hallway, the greater the chance I may find myself walking down the hallway with him.

 

I understand I might be in the minority. We live in an abbreviated world where things are said in 140 characters and the number 8 is used to spell words like "gr8," so the "boring parts" of a novel may be relics of a bygone age of storytelling. Readers have a growing expectation for writers to get to the point. I think there can be a compromise: eliminate those parts if you find they're slowing your story down, but don't cut them for the sake of cutting them. Leave them in if that's what your writer's heart tells you.

 

How about you? How do you handle the "boring parts" of a novel?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Nix Unnecessary Words

Writing Tip: Keep the Story Moving Forward

5,793 Views 7 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: editing, self-publishing, writing, drafts, development, craft
4

I'd like to tell you how wonderful I am. I'm an excellent writer. I've won too many awards to list. I've sold a bunch of books. I can do 10 pushups without a break, and while I can't run a four-minute mile, I can drive it in about a minute and a half from a dead stop. 

 

In case you think I've lost my mind, let me assure you I'm just trying to make a point. If you take to social media to build your brand, you can't do it in a heavy-handed fashion. You have to steer clear of the "me-me-me" approach. Social media is all about building a community. Instead of making it entirely about you, make it about your friends, followers, and readers. They are the ones who will ultimately be responsible for your success, so treat them accordingly.

 

I often see authors focus on themselves. I get it. It's their platform, and they are there to draw attention to themselves and their books. But in today's social media driven world, your brand is the centerpiece of a community. Your role as an author may be what brought your community together, but there are many parts and personalities that you should take the time and effort to highlight.

 

With the community focus in mind, consider trying one of these tactics: Allow a fan to take over your blog for the day with guest posts. Include a "fan of the week" post on Facebook or Twitter. Share or retweet your followers' links that resonate with you. In other words, find ways to share the spotlight with the people who support your career. By doing so, you give your fans greater reason to participate in your community, and they will be more apt to share their positive experience with their friends, followers, and families.     

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 

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Include Calls to Action

Considering a Reader's Suggestion

8,896 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: selling, writers, readers, writing, community, fans, social_networking, social_media
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

4 Ways to Cultivate Fan Activists to Help with Word of Mouth Marketing -Marketing Tips

Author and branding expert Eric Thomas reveals his secrets to finding superfans who love spreading the word.                                                    

 

In Book Marketing, Sometimes Less is More! -Self Publishing Coach

Author AFN Clarke discusses his experience with advertising his books.

 

Film

 

Film School Thru Commentaries - Filmmaking.net

Kevin Smith explores who does and doesn't need to go to film school in the world of filmmaking.

 

5 Things You Should Know About DSLR Film Making - Raindance

Meet the camera that is changing independent filmmaking.

                                    

Music

 

#10 Change with Bob Baker - #BBTD

Music marketing guru Bob Baker talks succeeding, failing, and all the hurdles in between.

 

Great Advice from Sting's Guitarist -Ashley J. Saunders

Dominic Miller discusses the proper way to hold a guitar.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 13, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - September 6, 2013

2,959 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, marketing, selling, book, music, filmmaking, self-publishing, movies, writers, publishing, writing, book_marketing, films, musicians, filmmakers, social_media
3

In 1958, the incomparable George Plimpton interviewed the equally incomparable Ernest Hemingway in the spring edition of the Paris Review. It's a fascinating interview, and I highly recommend it. There are a lot of great morsels of sage advice for writers. The most useful in my opinion is the following:

 

You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again.

 

I found the advice so useful that I've incorporated it into my own routine. It was not easy to follow in the beginning. It turns out it takes as much discipline to stop writing as it does to start. There is a natural inclination to write until the well is dry. Having an idea and seeing it come alive on the page is an exhilarating feeling. It is energizing to experience the unfolding of a story.  In short, the creative process gets you jazzed. 

 

Stopping when you know what is going to happen next is a lot like slamming on the brakes when you're traveling at 100 miles per hour in a car hauling a heavy load. It just doesn't seem prudent. The first night I followed Hemingway's advice, I couldn't sleep. I felt as if the character I had left hanging in the middle of a dicey situation was standing at my bedside pleading with me to get up and finish the scene. I fought the urge until morning, and then hopped out of bed and wrote with an incredible vigor.

 

Over the weeks and months since incorporating this strategy, stopping has become easier, and I've learned to shut down long enough to get some much needed sleep. The enthusiasm to get back to the story is still there when I wake up. Hemingway's advice has worked for me, and if you're looking for a new approach to your writing routine, I highly recommend you give it a try. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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That Wise Old Doubt

When to Walk Away from a Story

3,699 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: editing, self-publishing, writers, writing, drafts, writing_process, craft
0

Several posts back, I explained the concept of showing vs. telling by using the example of an online dating profile to demonstrate the difference. Today, I'd like to delve into a key reason why it's important to show and not tell your readers.

 

Being told is annoying!

 

I just read a novel by a world-famous author who has sold hundreds of millions of books around the world, which admittedly is hundreds of millions more than I have sold. However, despite her success and fame, I wanted to throw this particular novel out the window, and I might have done so had I not been on an airplane while reading it.

 

Here's what drove me nuts: Over and over, the author told me about the wonderful, loving, supportive relationships the protagonist enjoyed with her husband and daughter, often repeating herself as she did so – and by repeating herself I mean literally using the exact same phrases. If being told the relationships were wonderful, loving, and supportive wasn't irritating enough (there were no examples to show me, just descriptions to tell me), over and over the author repeated herself to make her point. Did I mention that over and over she repeated herself to make her point? Yep, over and over she repeated herself to make her point.

 

See how irritating that is?

 

In addition to the tediousness of reading the same thing page after page after page after page, the repetition made me feel as if the author thought I wasn't smart enough to "get it" the first time. But I am smart enough, and so are most readers. So take my experience to heart, and when you're writing your own novel, give your readers some credit, and let them figure things out for themselves. I suspect they'll appreciate you for doing so.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Avoid Word Repetition

Writing Takes Discipline

2,557 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: writers, readers, writing, drafts, writing_process, craft, character_development, show_vs_tell
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

5 Steps for Restarting Your Book Marketing Efforts after a Break -Duolit

What to do when building your brand has taken a backseat to living your life.

                                       

Goodreads for Authors with Patrick Brown -The Creative Penn

The director of author marketing and community manager at Goodreads shares some valuable insights for authors about the online community of readers.

 

Film

 

The New Marketing Model for Filmmakers - AdPulp.com

A look at the world of online media for filmmakers that goes beyond YouTube.

 

Equity Crowdfunding, a New Financing Opportunity for Independent Filmmakers - Filmlinker

Is this a viable new financing strategy for independent filmmakers?

                                    

Music

 

The War of Art: Resistance and the Music Producer - Renegade Producer

How to battle that little voice in your head that's trying to hold you back from taking chances.

 

How Streaming Affects Music Revenue Growth -Hypebot.com

Are the latest music streaming statistics signaling a growth in music revenue?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - September 6, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - August 30, 2013

2,805 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, marketing, book, music, self-publishing, indie, movies, writers, publishing, writing, films, promotions, musicians, craft, filmmakers, branding, social_media, crowdsourcing
1

Good dialogue has a rhythm to it. As you read it, you can feel its flow. You can imagine the stops and starts, the highs and lows, the tonality and the emotion - and you can sense it all without the author telling you when the speaker is mad or happy or tired. All of that is in the rhythm of the dialogue.

 

In order to create that kind of rhythm, character development is of paramount importance. If you've put in the work of creating multidimensional characters and you've given the reader a real sense of what drives a character at any given moment, the reader will take that information, apply it to the dialogue and extrapolate the rhythm. 

 

Stephen King advises against the liberal use of "ly" words (adverbs). He feels that it shows timid writing that suggests an author lacks confidence in his or her own ability. Very often, these adverbs appear either before or after a line of dialogue. 

 

"Give me the money,"John said angrily. 

 

Jane cleared her throat and said nervously, "I don't have the money." 

 

Neither example is terrible, and taken out of context, the "ly" words are helpful. But within the body of a novel, where you've established that "John" in this example is prone to anger and has been searching for the money, it's unnecessary to tell the reader that he angrily asked for it. In addition, you may have established that "Jane" spent the money and has been dreading the moment she would be asked for it. The reader doesn't need to know that she nervously responded to John's demand.

 

Spend the time to develop your characters so you can ditch the adverbs and give your dialogue rhythm. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Use Adverbs Sparingly, Especially in Dialogue

What Do Your Characters Want?

4,612 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, books, authors, author, writers, writing, craft, dialogue, grammar
0

When I was writing my first novel, I was so excited to see my own words on the page that I ended up with several scenes that didn't have much at all to do with the main plot. After I signed with an agent, she pointed out this tendency to wander and had me cut a lot. I mean, a LOT. It was painful to hit the delete key, but I realized she was right. (Click here to read my post on what to do with scenes you cut.)

 

When you're writing a novel, it's important to always keep the story moving forward. If you go off on tangents that have nothing to do with the plot or aren't going to somehow tie back into it later, your readers are going to get confused or bored, and they may stop reading entirely.

 

I recently finished reading a murder mystery that veered off in several directions with new characters who seemed interesting enough, but then they all disappeared and never wound their way back into the story. When the killer was revealed and the book was over, instead of feeling satisfied, I found myself scratching my head and thinking, "But what happened to that little blonde girl on the side of the road? And why didn't I find out what the deal was with that creepy truck driver guy? And where did that wise old lady from the restaurant go?"

 

It felt almost as if the author didn't finish writing the book. Having subplots can keep a novel interesting, but they need to keep the overall story moving forward. If they go nowhere, your story goes nowhere, and your readers might end up going somewhere else for their next book.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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What Comes after the Conflict?

Overwriting? Just Say It!

4,978 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, plot, craft
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How Did I Get So Many Reviews Of 'Broken Pieces?' -BadRedHead Media

How one author managed to get more than 140 reviews for her indie title.    

                                       

Networking Tips for Shy Authors -The BookBaby Blog

A guide to take your networking from the virtual world to the real world.

 

Film

 

Creative Things to Do When an Actor Won't Return for a Sequel - Den of Geek

How do you do the sequel to your indie hit without the same actors?

 

Is Crowdfunding Changing the Game for Filmmakers? A Q&A with Spike Lee - Huffington Post

The legendary indie filmmaker looks at the changing world of film financing. 

                                                                                                                                              

Music

 

The Game of Music Knowledge - The Musicians Guide

Are you making music career choices based on emotion or reason?

 

5 Tips on How to Get More Followers on Instagram -musicgoat.com

Lest we forget, Instagram can be a potent marketing tool. 

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - August 30, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - August 23, 2013

2,911 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: authors, marketing, reviews, music, filmmaking, film, author, self-publishing, indie, movies, writers, writing, promotions, social_networking, musicians, filmmakers, branding, social_media
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