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Sometimes it feels like there are a year's worth of activities packed in those weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. There are meals to be cooked, parties to attend, gifts to buy, loved ones to entertain, and most importantly, books to promote! Free time may have been scarce before all that, but it is virtually nonexistent during the busy holiday season.

 

So what's a writer to do? It's a herculean effort to juggle the normal tasks day in and day out. Add the holidays to the mix and it seems impossible. You don't want to neglect your writing, but at the same time, you don't want to miss those special moments during this time of the year.

 

The only solution here is to scale back on the writing. Don't cease to write; keep adding pages to your manuscript when you can, but it's okay if for a short time it's not your top priority. I'm not suggesting your book isn't important. It is. But as a writer, you constantly have to ration your time, and you might just feel that other commitments take precedence for a few weeks.

 

Just because you aren't physically putting pen to paper doesn't mean you aren't writing! This time of year is usually full of highs and lows that can add fuel to your creative tank. The holidays provide you with uniquely engrossing distractions that can give you great ideas for future storylines. Also, if you're able to disconnect from your project for a bit, you may find a completely fresh perspective that recharges you and your story when you return.

 

So if you haven't been as productive as you'd like during the holidays, don't beat yourself up over it. Pat yourself on the back, because I'll bet that once the last celebration of this season is over, your fingers will be racing across your computer's keyboard.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Hold a Holiday Contest

Need to Blog, but Short on Time?

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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Authors Exercise Their "Write" to Self-publish - CBS Sunday Morning

Rita Braver looks at the rise of the self-publishing industry and how more and more established authors are choosing independent publishing.

 

Self-Publishing Gets Respect -Beyond the Book

The growing number of retail successes in the self-publishing world has the entire industry retooling and reexamining old practices.

 

Film

 

Rain Rain! 15 Rainy Day Shooting Tips for Videographers - Videomaker

The weather outside may be frightful, but that's no reason you can't shoot.

 

Is It an Actor's Job to Promote Their Films? - Film Courage

You don't hire actors just because they're great promoters, but you do want actors who will help you promote your film.

 

Music

 

How to Start a Scene for Beginners - Promote Your Music

That's "scene" as in music scene. This is advice on how to simultaneously promote a band and a venue.

 

The 10 Biggest Mistakes Artists Make When Ordering Merch - Digital Music News

Planning counts, even when it comes to selling your band's merchandise.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - December 14, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - December 7, 2012

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'Tis the season to sell, sell, sell. If you're an author looking for a reason to remind your friends, family, and fans that you have a book available for sale, then this is the excuse you've been waiting for. Holidays are a marketer's paradise. It's the one time of year where consumers expect to be inundated with gift-buying ideas. Much of the time, they don't just expect it, they appreciate it. So don't be shy. Jump right in there. Don't let them forget you; more importantly, don't let them forget your book.

 

While you're at it, don't forget your older books. You don't have to always restrict your book marketing efforts to your most current title. We live in a world where books no longer go out of print, so there's no reason to move on to your latest published masterpiece at the expense of your previous masterpieces. In fact, wouldn't the perfect holiday gift be your entire collection?

 

When you're putting out those reminders via email or social network, include all your books with their one-sentence descriptions. You do have one-sentence descriptions, right? They are perfect for times like this when people are short on time but desperate for solid gift ideas. Save them even more time by providing links to all of your books' detail pages, or one place where they can find them all, like your website or your Amazon Author Central page. Make it as easy as possible for them to make the decision and buy your books for the people they care about.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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A Brick & Mortar Holiday

Publicity Stunts

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I don't write children's books, but my friend Raymond Bean does. He's the author of the popular Sweet Farts series, so I asked him to share his thoughts on the genre. Here's what he had to say:


I teach 4th grade by day and write children's books by night. I spend my days helping young readers sift through the book baskets and find the gems they'll want to read. Reading, writing, and sharing with my target audience has taught me a ton about the likes and dislikes of young readers.


Obviously, just like writing for adults, there's not a one-size-fits-all formula for kids. Taste in books varies wildly. I aim for the reluctant reader - the kids who read a few pages of a book, put it back, and repeat. They have a hard time finding a book they're willing to read to completion. They're finicky, set in their ways, and (in many cases) avoid reading like the plague. Of course, not all young readers are reluctant; in fact, most aren't. But if you aim for them, the eager readers should be a cinch!


Writing for kids is a blast. Relax, have fun, and trust your instincts. Here are three tips:


  • Kids love illustrations! It fascinates me how even the most basic illustration can really grab their attention. Adding just a few to your book can go a long way.


  • Your title and cover MUST get their attention. Some kids pick books up and put them back so fast the human eye can't even track it! Whether they're flipping through the book basket at school or clicking away on their e-reader, you've got seconds to get their attention. You might have the best book they'll ever read, but if your title/cover is weak, they'll never know it because they won't turn the page. When I wrote Sweet Farts the working title was Wind. I don't think it would have reached as many readers if I hadn't changed it.


  • Keep it real. It doesn't matter if you're writing realistic fiction or far out sci-fi. Keep your dialogue real. Dialogue that doesn't ring true with kids is a death sentence. If there's one place I stand my ground during editing, it's dialogue. I've had editors suggest changes in dialogue that make sense for adult work, but for a children's book it needs to stay. Your 10-year-old main character can't sound like he's pushing 40. If your dialogue is off, kids will drop your book so fast they'll be in the kitchen munching on Doritos before your book hits the bedroom floor.


I don't use illustrations in my novels, but Raymond's second two points are right on the money for writers of all genres, not just children's book authors. To learn more about his books, visit www.raymondbean.com.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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What is a Young Adult Novel?

Advice from New York Times Bestselling Author Guy Kawasaki

2,075 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, self-publishing, indie, writers, writing
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What's better than giving out one or all of your books as gifts this holiday season? Gifting autographed copies. Imagine the smiles on the faces of lucky readers when they receive autographed copies of your books in the mail. It's something they will tell their friends and families about. Put another way, it's a word-of-mouth catalyst that could have far-reaching benefits.

 

Obviously, the logistics of selling autographed copies can get complicated and unwieldy. So, my suggestion is to hold a contest to give a signed copy or copies of your book away. Thankfully, social networking has made organizing and holding these types of contests relatively simple. Twitter and Facebook are great for engaging readers in contests; just be sure you abide by each network's guidelines and rules (find Twitter's contest guidelines here, and Facebook's here). I've also hosted contests on my blog, where I created my own rules for the participants that described what they would win, how they could win (and what would exclude them from winning), when the contest ended, and when I would announce the winner. Then, you just need to make an announcement to your friends and followers and update them periodically with reminders until the end of the contest.

 

There are a number of ways to structure the contest. I've seen authors post a cover of the book and announce that a random person who shares the post would get a signed copy. I've also seen authors say that the first ten people who leave a comment would get a signed copy. My most successful contest involved a bit of trivia from the actual book. The first few people who sent me a private message with the correct answer were winners.

 

Contests are great marketing tools. They can generate a buzz about your work that other marketing efforts lack. They're fun and generate a sense of excitement. Add to the mix that the prize is a signed copy of one of your books, and you multiply the buzz-worthiness of the contest.

 

One last piece of advice: track the feedback you get on the contest. You can use the information for the next contest you decide to hold. And, above all, have fun with it.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Connect with Your Volunteer Sales Force

Interact, Interact, Interact!

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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

Authors Who Say "I Don't Have Enough Time for Promotion" Are Doomed to Fail - Duolit

A post about every writer's least-favorite hyphenated word: self-promotion.

 

Conquer the Flashing Menace: How to Get Your Ideas Out of Your Head and Down on Paper -The Future of Ink

Writing is 90% banishing the distraction caused by self-doubt.


Film

 

Making Good Movies on the Cheap - The Reality-Based Community

Examples of successful movies made on relatively low budgets.

 

20 Filmmaking Secrets Every Filmmaker Should Know - Indie Movie Making

Practical production tips for low-budget filmmaking.

 

Music

 

Spider Silk Inspires Beautiful Music - Wired

Researchers used math to translate the protein structure of spider webs into music.

 

You Don't Have to Be Local - Derek Sivers

When it comes to marketing, global is the new local.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - December 7, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - November 30, 2012

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The holiday season is upon us, and we are faced with an onslaught of holiday-themed movies, TV shows, and music. Oh, how we'll rejoice...and quickly grow tired of it. The one thing you don't see a lot of is an avalanche of holiday-themed novels that come out this time of year. There are the occasional titles that pop up, but there's never been a consistent flow of novels dedicated to this season of multiple holidays.


It is a trend bound to change with the barriers to and expense of publishing being so low that there are no longer obstacles to releasing books in a fast and effective manner. What once took months to turn around now only takes days. My prediction is that eventually everyone from indie authors to big publishing houses will offer up mysteries, thrillers, horror, fantasy, etc. books geared to this time of year.


So the question is, should you try to capitalize on holiday-themed novels? If you are so inclined, then sure! It certainly can't hurt. In fact, it might even be a fun exercise to create a thematic novel that can supplement your other books. It could also be a great way to reach a new audience. The great thing about these themed books is that they have built-in marketing timelines; you can market them year after year during the holiday season.


I'd like to issue one word of warning. From a storyteller's perspective, you would be tackling a subject that is extremely familiar to most of the population. In a lot of ways, writing a book about the holidays is like a singer covering a hit song. You have to work a little bit harder to make it your own. So, if you're going to write a holiday-themed book, put your own little twist on it that will set it apart.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Why Print On-Demand?

Should Authors Ever Reinvent Their Brands?

721 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, selling, selling, novel, novel, self-publishing, self-publishing, writers, writers, writing, writing, holiday, holiday
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I'm on an email listserv for one of my alma maters, on which people initiate discussion threads on anything from politics and business ethics to job openings and apartments for rent. I pick and choose what I want to read, respond to, or delete.


There's one member of the listserv who has caught my attention, and unfortunately not in a good way. He's an aspiring novelist, and every two weeks or so he sends around an email with a negative headline and a link to his most recent blog post. One week it's "Why social media doesn't work for authors," and the next it's "Is blogging a waste of time for authors?" Once, he posted something along the lines of "How traditional publishing exploits authors." The links all point back to his own website, which is positioned as...wait for it...a source for marketing advice for authors.


This man could use a little advice himself.


I suppose that by being so negative he's intentionally trying to be controversial to stir up interest in his manuscript, but it's not working. (I also believe he thinks he's being witty, but he's not.) Instead, by only posting what are more or less rants, he's coming across as bitter, angry, and a little desperate, even a bit mean. His approach doesn't make me root for him in his efforts to publish, and it certainly doesn't make me want to read his book.


My advice to him and other authors, aspiring or otherwise? If you want to use a blog, Twitter, etc. to drum up interest in your book, go ahead, but keep it mostly positive. Interesting and analytical writing about your experiences is one thing; negative and jaded ranting is another.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Is Your Brand Built for Controversy?

Publicity Stunts

1,570 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, marketing, self-publishing, writers, blogging, social_media
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You're set and ready to go with your books online this holiday season. You've been beefing up your online presence, chatting it up with friends on Facebook, tweeting followers on Twitter, and blogging about your book being the perfect holiday gift this year. That's great. You're working e-commerce opportunities, as you should. But should you also move beyond the information superhighway and hit the real streets this holiday season? I say yes.

 

Why not visit a few brick-and-mortar stores in your area and set up a personal appearance this holiday season? I'm not talking about bookstores; let's face it, the second you walk into a bookstore, you've got other books to compete with. I'm talking about visiting local brick-and-mortar businesses that don't normally sell books, but they do sell a product that ties in with your book.

 

Got a murder mystery featuring a cat? Why not head over to your closest pet supply store and arrange to set up a table? Did you write a book on organic gardening? A store that sells health food products or gardening supplies might be a great place to make an appearance. Are you the author of a fantasy novel? A hobby store, comic book shop, or even video game store could be the ideal place for you to sell to fans of your genre.

 

My advice is to look for independently owned stores to implement this strategy. Chain stores have a corporate structure that could make things a bit frustrating to navigate. Your best bet is to find a small business, let them know you're a local indie author, and make your case.

 

Good luck, and if you decide to try this strategy share your experience with the community!

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Three Grassroots Marketing Tips to Put in Place Today

Guerrilla Book Marketing Tactic

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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.


Books/Publishing


The Ten Commandments of Choosing the Right Book Title - Duolit

People will judge a book by its cover and, more importantly, its title.


Where Writers Write: Kristy Athens -The Next Best Book Blog

Sometimes it really does matter WHERE an author writes.


Film


Teaching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Watch a Film Masterclass with Ang Lee - Film School Rejects

A long, but edifying video featuring the legendary filmmaker.


Secret Film Investing Club - Filmmaking Stuff

Spoiler Alert: There is no secret society of people eager to invest in films. You have to rely on good-old-fashioned hard work to find them.


Music


3 Effective Ways to Market Your Music Online Via Social Media - Musicians Buzz

Just a little reminder that social media is the best way to build a brand and fan base.


How to Create Guitar Calluses (Myths and Truths) - Music Goat

Hint: if it sounds too wacky to be true, it probably is.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Roundup - November 30, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - November 23, 2012

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Fingers cramping? Eyes tired? Brain exhausted? Computer overheating? If you're experiencing any of these plights, you may have just spent the month of November writing a 50,000-word novel for National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). The authors at CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing are right there with you! We've watched their progress at the start and midpoint of NaNo; now let's see how they concluded their month of furious writing!

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Phoebe, Kindle Direct Publishing

FINAL WORD COUNT: 50,064

What was your overall experience?

It's been a blast! I love meeting and talking with fellow authors who are all working toward the same goal. There was a period when I was doubtful, but I just kept plugging away and thinking about the "winner" t-shirt I preordered, which was hanging on my wall waiting for me to earn it.

 

How are you celebrating?

On Friday I went out with the Seattle Drunken Write-In crew, on Saturday I went to the official "Thank Goodness It's Over" skating party, and on Sunday I did a whole lot of nothing but video games.

 

What are your plans for the book?

After I've set it aside for a few weeks, I'll take a look back through it and see what kind of actual story I came out with. Even though I hit 50k, I definitely didn't get to "The End." So much of it came from the pressure to just get out more words that the narrative flow is all over the place. After much editing and rewriting, I'd like to send it to some beta readers for feedback.

 

Will you do it again?

Without question. Toward the end of the month when I got up a good head of steam and really had confidence that I was going to reach 50K, I realized it actually feels like I'm getting better at NaNo each year I do it. I stick with one story more consistently and I write more words per day more consistently, and even if Sturgeon's Law and my own two eyes tell me 90% of it is crap, that still means I've got an awesome 10% I never would have had otherwise.

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Margaret, CreateSpace

FINAL WORD COUNT: 30,000

What was your overall experience?

Overall, it was really good. Before NaNoWriMo, I didn't make writing a habit because I didn't think I had time for it. Because of the contest's goal and deadline, I had to include writing time in my daily schedule. Now I have time built in to keep writing!

 

How are you celebrating?

I'll probably keep writing; I didn't quite make it to 50,000 words, so plan to keep writing to complete the novel by mid-December.

 

What are your plans for the book?

When the book is done, I'll give it to a few different people to read, edit it from their feedback, and then likely publish it on KDP.

 

Will you do it again?

Definitely. It's been a great exercise in time management. Next time I'll know how to prepare going into NaNoWriMo. I'll do more timeline, outline, and character preparations before diving in.


Zach, CreateSpace

FINAL WORD COUNT: 20,000

 

What was your overall experience?

I truly enjoyed getting back into writing after such a long dry spell. It was great to work with a deadline in mind, and even though I didn't make it, it was still a lot of fun.

 

What are your plans for the book?

When it's done, I really want to work on getting it ready to publish. I have several friends who will read through it with me (whether they know it or not) so I hope that the editing will go smoothly from there.

 

Will you do it again?

I'll definitely do NaNoWriMo again, but I also want to try smaller challenges, like setting aside a week or weekend primarily for writing. For me, it was easy to skip a day and argue I could make up the difference tomorrow since I had a whole month, so I want to see if I can set smaller goals to keep me on track throughout the year.

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Katy, Kindle Direct Publishing

FINAL WORD COUNT: 12,390

What was your overall experience?

About halfway through November, work and life got exceedingly busy, so I had to put NaNo on hold, which is frustrating! I got back to it every several days, but my stories were effectively dead in the water by 11/20. Curse you, life!

 

Will you still work on the novel?

Heck yes. I know the idea's good because everyone I've ever described it to has loved it - I just have to get it done. I'll then have several of my friends copyedit it. I worked as a writing tutor in college, so I'm also going to print it out and rip it apart by treating it like someone else's writing (I am ruthless). And then, publication through KDP and CreateSpace is the plan!

 

Will you do it again?

Definitely. It makes me write even in the face of everything I have going on in my life. Halfway through the month, I almost always get sidetracked by how insane November can be leading up to the Christmas season, but what I get written is awesome! The main thing for me to remember is that setbacks aren't death knells.

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Andrea, CreateSpace

FINAL WORD COUNT: 12,000

What was your overall experience?

LOVE LOVE LOVE. I can't wait for next year. Maybe I'll actually finish!

 

How are you celebrating?

I'll keep writing in the month of December and hope I can do it in two months instead of just one. There could possibly be a glass of liquid courage in there too to celebrate the long month of literary tenacity.

 

What were your relationships like with other writers throughout NaNo?

There was nothing but positive feedback and mutual enthusiasm. Who could ask for anything more?

 

Any final thoughts?

Keep at it. And remember, the first person you need to satisfy with your writing is yourself, not the critics.

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Jonny, CreateSpace

FINAL WORD COUNT: 1,850

What was your overall experience?

I've wanted to participate in NaNoWriMo for years, and I am glad I finally gave it a shot. I knew I would be busy this month, as I set out to overachieve, and I was only able to complete part of my goals. When I was able to write, it felt rushed and stressful, as I had other obligations that took priority. The experience gave me a greater appreciation for the authors I work with every day, most of whom have jobs, lives, and children to balance as well. Every book that is published deserves applause. It takes time, dedication, and patience to write.

 

What were your relationships like with other writers throughout NaNo?

When speaking to my peers who participated, they took on a wonderful literary tone. It warmed my heart to have a more thoughtful conversation than a normal day would provide.

 

Any final thoughts?

Sometimes it takes a finish line to motivate us towards our goals, but just remember that life goes on after the race is done.


Can you relate to any of the CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing authors? How did you do in this year's NaNoWriMo?

 

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NaNoWriMo 2012: The CreateSpace & KDP Chronicles, Part 2

NaNoWriMo 2012: The CreateSpace & KDP Chronicles, Part 1

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Thanks to streaming video services, I've watched a great deal of movies recently that I missed when they originally came out five or six years ago. I'm not sure why I missed them, but a number of them I didn't even know existed. During one spate of this period of cinematic catch-up, I noticed that various characters in more than a few of these films mentioned a social network that was extremely popular at the time, but is a virtual ghost town today. No one really uses it. I left the storyline for a brief second to reflect on how quickly times change.


That was the problem. This seemingly innocuous reference removed me from the storyline. That is the danger of alluding to pop culture in your stories. It tends to remove the reader from the story. Some would argue that pop culture references can help set the scene or even build character. I agree with that to a degree, but you have to be very judicious in its use.


The other downside to using pop culture references is that because the temptation is so strong to use them, you may find that a number of authors have used the same pop culture reference. Suddenly, that passage you thought was original and spot-on looks borrowed and eventually dated.


To give your book the opportunity to become an evergreen classic and to make it truly original, avoid pop culture references, or at the very least, minimize them.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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The Great American Novel

Use Emotion to Propel Your Story

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I just finished reading a political thriller that could have been pretty interesting...if I hadn't been so confused much of the time I was reading it.


Here's what rattled me: Over and over, the author had one character say something, and a different character do something, in the same paragraph.


Here's an example, with names changed. Over three paragraphs, we learn about a meeting between John Smith and David Johnson. The first two paragraphs are clear, but by the end of the third one, I'm lost:


"Thanks for taking my meeting on such short notice, Mr. Smith."


"Call me John, please. And it's no problem at all. I am always happy to take a referral from Mr. Winfield. Sit," he said, pointing to the conference table in his office. "Can we get you some coffee, water, anything?"


"Thanks, no." The two sat down. "Well, let me start with a confession. Mr. Winfield didn't refer me to you. He doesn't even know who I am," which in the greater context of things, was true. John Smith looked at David Johnson quizzically. "I am here to make you a business proposal."


Say what?


Some authors successfully have multiple speakers in a paragraph with no ambiguity, but not every writer has that ability. To avoid uncertainty about who is speaking, break up the dialogue and action into separate paragraphs per character, as the author did well in the first two paragraphs. Separating the speakers keeps the readers focused on the story, not the structure. It also results in shorter paragraphs, which makes your book easier - and thus more enjoyable - to read. Who doesn't like the feeling of progress that comes with turning a page?


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Avoid Confusing Dialogue

Look Who's Talking

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Whether you write science fiction, fantasy, mysteries, or any other genre, we all have one thing in common: we owe a debt of gratitude to our readers. After all, if it wasn't for them, publishing would be an exercise in futility. We need the readers.


For that reason, I have a suggestion. As a writer who owes such gratitude, show such gratitude. Recognize your readers. Give them their day in the sun and simply let them know how much you appreciate them. Giving them all some sort of personal recognition may be impossible, but you can pick a few, either at random or systematically, and recognize them on behalf of all your readers.


I've seen a number of fan recognition programs that other authors and even bloggers do to thank the readers. In a "fan of the month" program, an author might pick a fan, usually based on the number of interactions on social networks, and post their picture and a link to their Twitter account or Facebook page. This could prompt other fans to follow or friend them, a strategy that not only offers the fan recognition, but also connects your network of fans.


In addition to a "fan of the month" program, I've also seen authors recognize fans for asking particularly insightful questions. Sometimes it's not even about the author or the book. It may be a related genre or publishing in general. Or it could just be a humorous comment they've made in your social media circle.


The point is to find a way to thank your readers publicly. Let them and others know that you appreciate your fans. It's a great way to strengthen your relationship with your readers.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Your Fans are Your Brand

Three Grassroots Marketing Tips to Put in Place Today

1,483 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, authors, self-publishing, writers, readers, fans
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Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.


Books/Publishing


Resilience: How to Deal with Criticism and Rejection - The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn and Mark McGuinness discuss the sometimes emotionally crippling effect of bad reviews.


How Do We Find Targeted Readers? 5 Top Tips! -BadRedhead Media

Author and social media consultant Rachel Thompson gives her best advice on where to find your readers.


Film


Crowdsourcing is Creating the Cloud Filmmaking Revolution - Venture Beat

Footage and creative material for your film may be just a cloud away.


Here's Why You Should Make Your Movie or Chase Your Dream Today - Joke and Biagio

A three-minute dose of inspiration; do what you love and happiness will follow.


Music


A Case Study on Trent Reznor - Alan Cross

A look at the man who turned the music industry on its ear by making a direct connection to the fans.


Music Biz Disappointments: When Bad News Turns Good - Bob Baker's Indie Music Promotion Blog

When one door closes, look for another door.


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


 

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Weekly News Roundup - November 23, 2012

Weekly News Roundup - November 16, 2012


740 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: books, books, authors, authors, marketing, marketing, music, music, self-publishing, self-publishing, films, films, musicians, musicians, filmmakers, filmmakers
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