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1

If you want your fans to talk about your books and/or read your future works, it's important to engage with them on a regular basis. In addition to having your own website, here are three suggestions:

 

1. Author Page on Amazon.com

 

Setting up an author page on Amazon is super easy and provides a great way for readers to learn about you. You can upload your bio and photo, include links to your blog and Twitter feed, and even post a video! Sometimes when I'm on the fence about buying a book, I will click on the link to the author's page. If there's nothing there, I end up not buying the book. Talk about a lost opportunity! Click here to check out my author page.

 

2. Facebook author page

 

I recently discovered a fantastic new tool called Discover My Books that makes my author page on Facebook more dynamic by allowing me to share my books, videos, and events with my fans. It also provides easy-to-use social marketing tools that allow my readers to share my books with their friends. Word-of-mouth is critical for authors, which is why I love this application. Click here to see how I use it on my Facebook author page.

 

3. Goodreads, Library Thing, and Shelfari profiles

 

Goodreads, Library Thing, and Shelfari are social networking sites for book lovers. Setting up an author profile is a great way to connect on an individual level with readers. I get friendship requests from readers all the time, and I accept and reply to every single one to make sure my fans know how much I appreciate their support.

 

The internet offers a plethora of ways to connect with your readers, many of which cost very little, if anything at all. Why not take advantage of them?

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

 

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Book Marketing Tip: Hold On To Your Contacts

How to Connect with Your Readers

9,351 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, promotion, writers, engage
2

The Internet is a "knock-around" place every once in a while. Here's an example: something is posted on a social media site that is ripe for a cutting and witty retort. In turn, that engenders an equally cutting and witty retort in response. Things escalate. Soon, the retorts grow less witty and more personal. Threats are made. Feelings are hurt. Your list of recipients for your holiday newsletter grows shorter. All because you thought a particular post could use your special brand of charm and flavor.

 

Chances are you've seen something like this happen online. The lesson here is that some things just don't need to be said. I learned that during the most recent U.S. election. In truth, I learned it several elections ago, but sometimes I just can't help posting about politics. Trust me, I'm getting much, much better at letting things go, and that's because I've adopted a "type and wait" policy. I type my response, but I don't post it. Instead, I move on to something else that occupies my time for 15 or 20 minutes, and then I come back to my response. I read it and then decide if I should post it or not. Nine times out of 10, I delete it and feel so much better for having done so. It truly did not need to be said.

 

We all know the topics that cause the most conflicts online (and in person, for that matter): religion, politics, tragedies, etc. People have strong emotional ties to these types of topics, and they should. But those emotions can lead to people feeling slighted or attacked if their position is challenged. Since you are an independent author trying to build a solid brand, you should be extra careful how you approach these situations to avoid tarnishing that brand. My advice is to let them have their say without feedback if you don't agree. If you absolutely can't let a post slide without comment, avoid argumentative language, especially - and I hope this goes without saying - profanity or name-calling.


I can tell you from my own personal experience, on that 10th time when I break down and post a reply, I rarely feel good about it. I fret and worry whether I've done the right thing. I can easily lose a night's sleep over it. It can easily be avoided by sometimes just leaving things unsaid.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Recognize Your Readers

Publicity Stunts

2,244 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, promotions, brand
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

7 Ways to Speed Up Your Writing - Wordplay

Steve Aedy gives his advice on how to approach writing as a trade.

 

5 Reasons to Set Your Novel in a Famous Place -Writer's Digest

Using famous settings comes readymade with marketing prospects.

 

Film

 

7 Challenges Facing Independent Filmmakers - Photography and Film Making for Newbies

Challenges are just opportunities for learning.

 

12 Filmmaking Tips from Sundance Directors - Film School Rejects

Some of the brightest stars from the indie filmmaking world dish out their best tips and tricks of the trade.

 

Music

 

How to Learn an Instrument Digitally - The Future of Music

Access to knowledge is no longer an obstacle to learning a musical instrument.

 

5 Tips to Improve your Home Studio - Noise Addicts

Engineer and producer Barry Gardner shares his tips for creating the optimal home studio.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - February 1, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - January 25, 2013

605 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, promotions, filmmakers
1

Some writers are fortunate enough to never have to overcome writer's block, or so I'm told. Every writer I know personally has had to deal with it at one time or another to varying degrees of severity. I wrestle with it virtually every book I write. In fact, I still have unfinished manuscripts in folders on my computer just waiting for me to get back to them and add meat to their underdeveloped bones. I will.

 

And when I do, I will most likely read what I've written, open my graphics software, and start designing a cover for the book that it will one day be. I do it for one reason: envisioning a cover and constructing the various visual and design elements that go into it totally immerses me in the story. My mind takes all those thoughts I've had about the story and gives them order. I see the book in a single image. While I tinker with every little detail of the cover, I am forced to justify why they belong and explain to myself what they represent. More times than not, this technique will unblock me. The difficulties I had with the story become clearer as the cover takes shape.

 

The good news is if you want to try this method of beating writer's block, you don't have to know anything about imaging and graphic design software. You can cut pictures and words out of magazines to build a mock-up of a cover on a piece of cardboard and achieve the same results.

 

Sometimes beating writer's block simply takes seeing the story from a different vantage point. Creating a cover design can give you a fresh new perspective that may have eluded you in the past. Good luck and happy designing.

 

-Richard

 

 

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

 


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More Tips for Completing Your Manuscript

Can Visualization Help You Finish That Manuscript?

983 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, cover, writing, craft, branding
3

I go to the store. She goes to the store.


She and I go to the store.


Simple, right? Apparently not, because everywhere I go, and every time I turn on the TV, I hear people say things such as "Her and I go to the store" or "Her and I have been friends since college" or "Him and I get along great."


Why is this grammar mistake so common? You would never say "Her went to the store," right? So why would you say "Her and I went to the store?" And you would never say "Karen saw I," right? Or does "Karen gave I the apple" sound correct to you?


Here's how it works:


"I" and "she" are subject pronouns, i.e. they can be used as the subjects in a sentence.


  • I go to the store.
  • She goes to the store.


"Me" and "her" are object pronouns, i.e. they can be used as direct or indirect objects in a sentence.


  • Direct object: Karen saw me.
  • Indirect object: Karen gave me the apple.
  • Direct object: Karen saw her.
  • Indirect object: Karen gave her the apple.


The fight for good grammar in the written and spoken word rages on, but I'm determined to do my part to stop the madness. I hope you will help me!


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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The Dreaded "Who vs Whom"

One Speaker/Doer per Paragraph, Please

18,021 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, writing, craft, grammar
0

Recently I heard a few marketing gurus talk about creating a viral video, and they got into a relatively heated argument about one's ability to create such a video. Marketing guru "A" argued that it can't be done, that viral videos become viral because of their spontaneous nature. Marketing guru "B" claimed that if the idea is truly original and enough preparation and planning goes into the making of the video, it is indeed possible to create a viral video.

 

I tend to side with marketing guru "A" on the topic. The best viral videos contain an element of surprise that requires a genuine reaction from everyone on camera and even off. They work when the action before the payoff is simple and understated. It lulls the viewer into a false sense of familiarity, only to showcase an unexpected outcome. At its core, a viral video captures a unique "whoa" moment that touches the viewer in an extremely emotional way, and that emotion doesn't have to be funny. It can range from sadness to joy to disgust to anger. It varies. The only commonality in viral videos is the "once in a lifetime" nature of what was captured on camera.

 

It is true that produced videos have captured an enormous amount of buzz before, but not nearly as much as spontaneous videos. In fact, I would go so far as to call it a rare occurrence. And when it does happen, there is usually a large budget involved with highly trained professionals working on the video. In other words, I would say creating such a video would be beyond the resources of an indie author.

 

I bring this up not to try and dissuade you from using video as a marketing tool. On the contrary, I consider video to be an essential part of your brand-building efforts. I would simply caution you from purposely trying to make a viral video. I think your time would be better served doing personal videos and building an audience based on your own personality and views.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Publicity Stunts

Book Marketing Tip: Stay Positive

1,075 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, writers, publishing, craft, branding, viral_video
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.


Books/Publishing


9 Twitter Basics You May Not Know - BadRedead Media

Author Rachel Thompson breaks down her four+ years of experience using Twitter as a marketing tool.


Indie Author: You Need a Helping Hand to Succeed -Self-Publishing Review

Because we all need somebody to lean on, here's a list of online communities for writers and authors.


Film


20 of the Best Filmmaking Related Infographics - Filmlinker

Film facts and advice in images and numbers.


The Democratization of Filmmaking - Riveting Sci-Fi Short Film R'ha Created By A Single Person - Singularity Hub

A crew of one makes a one-in-a-million short film.


Music


10 Minute Music Video Creation and Promotion - Promote Your Music

Chris Rockett discusses the basics in creating a video to promote your music.


Vocal Tension and the Purposed Touch - Judy Rodman

Using the touch technique to let go of tension and relax.


-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.


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Weekly News Roundup - January 25, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - January 18, 2013

 

580 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, authors, promotion, musicians, filmmakers
1

We are self-published authors. That is a moniker that comes with a split personality, or at least it should. We aren't just making creative decisions when we write a book; we are making business decisions when we rewrite a book. We are creative types involved in the world of commerce, and that always comes with more than its fair share of inner conflict.

 

I have written things with blinders on, meaning I shut out the rational, business guy in my head and wrote with reckless abandon. But when I read the material a few weeks later, the publisher in me was more than outraged. What was I thinking? That's when the battle begins. To rewrite or not to rewrite: that is the question.

 

I get opinions from others, and I consider them carefully, but when it comes down to it, my two personalities have it out. And I have to say the writer in me usually wins. Occasionally, the publisher in me wins, but the artist in me is always resentful for not making the brave choice.

 

Here's how I try to make those decisions: When I come across a questionable choice, I stop and ask myself if it really helps the story or if it just satisfies my own selfish artistic cravings. It takes some soul searching to come up with an honest answer. If I'm just writing something to feed those artistic cravings, I'm not really making a good choice for the story. I'm making a choice that will stroke my artistic ego. That's when the publisher in me wins out.

 

Embrace your dual roles as an independent author. Doing so will make you both a better writer and a better publisher, and it will likely help you improve your story's quality and sell more books.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Write without Judgment

Be a Rule-breaker

1,972 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, craft, rewrite
2

No matter where you are in the process of becoming an author, attending a writers conference can be a valuable experience - especially if you're planning to take the indie route.


If you've completed your manuscript or book proposal, you can:

  • Get sections critiqued from agents, editors, and other attendees
  • Learn from industry professionals (in a session) or your author peers about the best ways to market it
  • Pitch it to a literary agent or an acquisitions editor from a publishing house


If you are working on a manuscript or book proposal, you can:

  • Get advice on editing, book design, and publishing
  • Run the idea by publishing professionals to get thoughts on the book's sales potential
  • Get sections critiqued from agents, editors, and other attendees
  • Learn what goes into a compelling book description (aka "hook")


If you haven't written a single word, you can:

  • Listen to and learn from the writing and publishing experiences of other authors
  • Attend sessions on how to tell a story, craft believable dialogue, or otherwise create quality content
  • Find out what agents and editors are looking for


To find a writers' conference near you, just do a simple internet search. Some conferences are quite expensive, but others cost less than $100 and are packed with useful sessions. Personally, I think it's a smart idea for any aspiring author to attend at least one. Not only is it a great chance to meet people who are in the same boat, it also enables you to see what you're up against. Watching the "pitch an agent/editor" line snake around the block is a wake-up call for anyone, no matter which publishing route you pursue. With hundreds of thousands of books being released every year, you'll need to find a way to make yours stand out. Authors who take action to improve their books and learn how to succeed in the publishing industry will have an edge over the competition.


-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.


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Inspiration Can Be Everywhere

Going Indie? Watch Out for Predators

5,432 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writers, promotions, conference
6

We talk a lot about branding on this blog. Our author branding conversations typically focus on building an identity or persona using various online tools: blogging, social media, online video, etc. But what about an aspect of branding that the corporate world utilizes? I'm talking about logos, a device that gives immediate visual recognition. Self-published authors could benefit from incorporating them into their branding strategies.

 

Think about it. Traditional publishing houses use logos. As indie authors, we are publishers, too. Shouldn't we be developing logos to give us that same snapshot brand recognition? In fact, I could make the argument that logos for self-published authors would carry more weight than the logos of traditional publishers. I don't know anyone who buys a book because it was published by a certain publisher, but I know a lot of people who buy books because they were written by a certain author.

 

A logo that represents an indie author could be a powerful tool in brand-building efforts. Where would a company like Nike be without the swoosh, or Mercedes without the three-pointed star? A well-designed logo can attract brand loyalty. Placing your logo on your website, social media accounts, books, etc. can help boost your visibility, and as soon as it's associated with exceptional writing and compelling novels, it can help in your efforts to drive up sales.

 

Developing a logo isn't something you should do on a whim. You should do your homework and do a few mockup designs to test them with your current network of friends, followers, and readers. Make sure your logo reflects you and your writing style, because once you pick one, you'll want to use it over and over again for a long, long time.

 

Are any of you currently using logos? If so, how have you used them?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Uniting Author Brands

Marketing: Begin with Your Strengths

3,060 Views 6 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, promotion, writers, writing, logos
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

What Did You Write When You Were a Kid? - GalleyCat

Kid's writer Jarrett J. Krosoczka gives a touching TED presentation about how he became an author.


Writing vs. Marketing - How Much Time to Spend on Each? - The Future of Ink

Time is a precious commodity. What's the best way to spend it?

 

Film


How Creativity, Art and Film Can Change Your Life - The Skanner

How making a film saved a homeless teen's life.

 

Filmmaking Evolved: Kickstarter Flicks Have Raised $100M to Date - Venture Beat

A closer look at fundraising for films using crowdsourcing.

 

Music

 

Use Promotional Products to Amp Up Your Band's Marketing - musicgoat

If you aren't selling promotional items for your band, you might be selling yourself short.

 

Indie Music Grabs 32.6% of U.S. Album Sales In 2012 - Hypebot.com

Indie music takes the number one spot in overall album sales in 2012.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - January 18, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - January 11, 2013

674 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, book, music, filmmaking, author, movies, musicians
2

Today, I'm going to talk about novel writing by examining character development on a cable television show: AMC's Breaking Bad. Please forgive me for mixing and matching my media, but good writing is good writing. I have the opinion that if you are a regular viewer of this program and you're a writer, you are basically attending a master's class in the art of character development.

 

For those of you who haven't seen the show, the premise is that a high school chemistry teacher is diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer, and he realizes his family will be left destitute when he dies. He decides to use his chemistry background to become a drug dealer and build a quick nest egg for his family before he succumbs to the cancer. So here we have a good man - an ordinary, hard-working school teacher - who turns to a criminal trade for the noble reason of providing for his family. What this man discovers is that he has a natural talent for this seedy and dangerous underworld, and this talent extends past his knowledge of chemistry. Over the course of the series, this good man develops a darker persona that shows he's far less noble than once portrayed.

 

In other words, the creators of the program have done something wholly unique in the world of storytelling; they've installed a reverse character arc that takes a protagonist that you root for because he's doing the wrong things for the right reasons and in essence, they turn him into the main antagonist of the story. And try as you might, you're still rooting for him even though he's now doing the wrong things for the wrong reasons.

 

As far as storytelling goes, that's a bold move. It's rarely done because it so difficult to pull off. In this case, it works for a number of reasons, but primarily it works because the main character, whether he's good or bad, is the underdog in nearly every situation he finds himself facing. It's an approach that I now strictly adhere to in my own writing.

 

I'd love to hear about the writing elements of books, TV shows, and movies that have crept into your own writing style. From where do you draw your writing education and inspiration?

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Inspiration Can Be Everywhere

Embracing Inspiration from Real-Life Moments

1,397 Views 2 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, author, writers, writers, writing, writing, craft, craft
1

A few weeks ago, I asked my buddy Raymond Bean, author of both the School Is a Nightmare and Sweet Farts series, to share his thoughts on what it takes to write a children's book. This week, I asked him for some tips on marketing a children's book. Here's what he had to say:

 

Call me old fashioned, but I believe the best marketing tool for a children's book is the children's book. Sure you can blog and tweet until your fingers fall off, but kids don't read blogs, and they don't care about your tweets because they're reading Justin Bieber's.

 

At the end of the day, your book is going to have to do most of the heavy lifting on its own. However, to increase the chances for success in an increasingly crowded market, here are some things you can do:


  1. Know your genre: Before choosing a title and cover for your book, follow the Amazon rankings daily, if not hourly. Will your book's title and cover pop next to the best-selling titles or blend into the background? If it pops, young readers and parents will discover it and give it a try.
  2. Give away free copies: Get your book out there! Give it away to friends with kids, mail it to bloggers, or gift it to schools and libraries. Giving away a hundred books once or twice a year can go a long way. Each of those copies will go out in the world and promote your work for years to come.
  3. Write multiple books: Don't write one book and expect it to shoot to the top and change your life forever. The best support for your books is more of your books! The more content you create, the more selection you provide your readers. Your ultimate goal is to build a reader base of people that appreciate your writing and want more. Give it to them!

 

I write contemporary fiction, but Raymond's smart advice applies to my genre too. So even if you're not a children's book author, I highly recommend following his practical suggestions to help promote your work. For more information about his books, visit www.raymondbean.com.

 

-Maria

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Maria Murnane is a paid CreateSpace contributor. She is the award-winning author of the romantic comedies Perfect on Paper, It's a Waverly Life and Honey on Your Mind. She also provides consulting services on book publishing and marketing. Learn more at www.mariamurnane.com.

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Four Forms of Creativity Fuel

Can Visualization Help You Finish That Manuscript?

5,932 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, author, writing, promotions, children's_books, branding
1

Write a Travel Novel

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger Jan 21, 2013

We open on a cruise ship. The relaxing, yet festive atmosphere suddenly gives way to the discovery of a dead body slumped over on a stool at one of the slot machines in the casino. An intrepid widow takes it upon herself to solve the mystery before the killer has the opportunity to disembark at the next port of call. Or, here's another storyline: we open on an all-inclusive resort where a struggling couple makes a last-ditch effort to save their marriage. They have seven days and six nights to fall in love again.

 

Novels with travel-centric themes are not only fertile ground for "beat the clock" plot building, they are also packed with built-in marketing prospects. Does your story take place on a cruise ship? Approach a cruise line about arranging a "floating" signing or discuss the possibility of them carrying your book in onboard gift shops. Is your setting in a tropical resort? Contact a resort about doing an appearance. You could even conduct a writing seminar on their property for guests. In addition to the actual locations, there are travel agencies and travel websites that might be open to some cross-marketing arrangement.

 

The beauty of writing a novel that focuses on some aspect of the travel industry is that it reaches a niche audience. Niche audiences are so convenient; they are generally easy to find because they tend to form communities and bond over their common interests, and in most cases, there already exists an industry that caters to their niche needs.

 

Beyond the promising aspects of publishing a novel that incorporates travel, think of the fun you'll have researching it. So what are you waiting for? Book that trip and pack your laptop. You've got some writing and relaxing to do.

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Could You Write a Holiday-themed Novel?

Marketing Based on Content

864 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: author, self-publishing, writers, writing, travel, promotions
0

Welcome to the Weekly News Roundup - a collection of news, advice and opinions from around the virtual globe.

 

Books/Publishing

 

How to Start a Novel Right: 5 Great Tips - Writer's Digest

Some tips that could save you some frustration during rewrites.

                                                    

Author to Swim 2.4 Miles to His Book Signing-GalleyCat

Publicity stunts are alive and well in publishing.                

 

Film

                                                        

Hire Actors - Filmmaking Stuff

The key to attracting investors could be tied to the actors you attach to your film.

                                          

Meet the Hollywood Eccentric Who Invented High Frame Rate Film 30 Years before 'The Hobbit'- The Verge

Peter Jackson is an innovative filmmaker who used a unique filmmaking process to shoot 'The Hobbit.'            

                                    

Music

 

7 Things You Probably Don't Want to Hear as a Musician... - Digital Music News

The list also includes four things musicians do want to hear.          

 

How to Promote a Brand - Music Coaching.com                                          

Music business expert Marty Maidenberg discusses the ins and outs of building a music brand.            

 

-Richard

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Richard Ridley is an award-winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

 

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Weekly News Roundup - January 11, 2013

Weekly News Roundup - January 4, 2013

694 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: self_publishing, book, music, film, author, writers, musicians, filmmakers
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